References of "Merrell, Christine"
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See detailWord recognition and reading comprehension of preschool children in Serbia
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Merrell, Christine; Tymms, Peter et al

in SAGE Open (2019)

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See detailLinks between socio-emotional skills, behaviour, mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Merrell, Christine; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

in European Journal of Psychology of Education (2018)

Young children’s socio-emotional skills are important for understanding their own and other’s behaviours and interactions. No study in Serbia has investigated this before. In this study we explored the ... [more ▼]

Young children’s socio-emotional skills are important for understanding their own and other’s behaviours and interactions. No study in Serbia has investigated this before. In this study we explored the links between early socio-emotional skills, behaviour, and mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia over time. Children (N = 159; 51% of girls) aged 5-8 were rated by the teachers on their socio-emotional skills and behaviour, and their mathematics and literacy assessed at three-time points over 14 months, twice in preschool and once at entry to school. At Time 3, when children entered school, their socio-emotional skills and behaviour were associated with gender, mathematics at Time 1 and their socio-emotional and behaviour ratings at Time 2, controlling for maternal education and literacy at Time 1. Mathematics at Time 3 was associated with mathematics at Time 2, controlling for gender, maternal education, literacy and behaviour at Time 1. No socio-emotional skills or specific behaviour were significant for mathematics. Literacy at Time 3 was associated with mathematics and social skills at Time 1, and literacy at Time 2, controlling for gender and maternal education. At all three times, girls were rated more positively than boys in socio-emotional skills and behaviour, except for adjustment to school setting where there were no differences. This study offers the first insight into the links between socio-emotional skills, behaviour and mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia which will inform the development and evaluation of interventions. Attrition of the sample limits the findings. [less ▲]

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See detailThe ability to read numbers: A universal measure?
Tymms, Peter; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bartholo, Tiago et al

in AERA (2018)

This study tests the hypothesis that there is a single pathway for the order in which children learn to identify numbers. Although a prime facie case can be made, systematic variation might be expected ... [more ▼]

This study tests the hypothesis that there is a single pathway for the order in which children learn to identify numbers. Although a prime facie case can be made, systematic variation might be expected because of teaching, or language of instruction, or country of origin. This study concludes that such variations are minor and that the pathway that children follow when learning to identify numbers follows the same pattern across different groups. This finding is significant in furthering our knowledge of children’s early mathematics development; it suggests that there is a universal developmental scale from which the diverse aspects of mathematical development can be viewed. This lays the foundation for international comparisons of the mathematical development of young children. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of predictors of emergent literacy
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Merrell, Christine; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

in The 16th European Conference on Developmental Psychology (2013, September)

Two studies examined the predictive value of a range of variables associated with young children on their later literacy. Study 1 involved children age 5 to 7 from Serbia (N = 159); Study 2 engaged ... [more ▼]

Two studies examined the predictive value of a range of variables associated with young children on their later literacy. Study 1 involved children age 5 to 7 from Serbia (N = 159); Study 2 engaged children age 4 to 6 from Luxembourg (N = 174). Children in Study 1 were assessed on entry to school, aged 5, and again at age 7. Children in Study 2 were assessed once, in preschool. In Study 1, multilevel models indicated that a baseline assessment administrated in school language at the age of 5, in particular with respect to their competence in mathematics, were the most significant predictors of children’s emergent literacy at the age of 7 after controlling for age, gender, vocabulary, and phonological awareness. In Study 2, gender, vocabulary, phonological awareness, and competence in mathematics at the age of 5 were significant predictors of emergent literacy at the same age, after controlling for age, test administered in school language, and behavior. The level of parental education in Study 1 and the children’s behavior in both studies proved not to be significant. Both studies have important educational implications, suggesting that practitioners should assess language-minority children at the start of school in their mother tongue and act upon the outcomes of those assessments to avoid later literacy problems. [less ▲]

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