References of "Menichi, B"
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See detailTargeting of zyxin to sites of actin membrane interaction and to the nucleus.
Nix, D. A.; Fradelizi, J.; Bockholt, S. et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2001), 276(37), 34759-67

The localization of proteins to particular intracellular compartments often regulates their functions. Zyxin is a LIM protein found prominently at sites of cell adhesion, faintly in leading lamellipodia ... [more ▼]

The localization of proteins to particular intracellular compartments often regulates their functions. Zyxin is a LIM protein found prominently at sites of cell adhesion, faintly in leading lamellipodia, and transiently in cell nuclei. Here we have performed a domain analysis to identify regions in zyxin that are responsible for targeting it to different subcellular locations. The N-terminal proline-rich region of zyxin, which harbors binding sites for alpha-actinin and members of the Ena/VASP family, concentrates in lamellipodial extensions and weakly in focal adhesions. The LIM region of zyxin displays robust targeting to focal adhesions. When overexpressed in cells, the LIM region of zyxin causes displacement of endogenous zyxin from focal adhesions. Upon mislocalization of full-length zyxin, at least one member of the Ena/VASP family is also displaced, and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton is perturbed. Zyxin also has the capacity to shuttle between the nucleus and focal adhesion sites. When nuclear export is inhibited, zyxin accumulates in cell nuclei. The nuclear accumulation of zyxin occurs asynchronously with approximately half of the cells exhibiting nuclear localization of zyxin within 2.3 h of initiating leptomycin B treatment. Our results provide insight into the functions of different zyxin domains. [less ▲]

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See detailActA and human zyxin harbour Arp2/3-independent actin-polymerization activity.
Fradelizi, J.; Noireaux, V.; Plastino, J. et al

in Nature cell biology (2001), 3(8), 699-707

The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic network that is composed of a variety of F-actin structures. To understand how these structures are produced, we tested the capacity of proteins to direct actin ... [more ▼]

The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic network that is composed of a variety of F-actin structures. To understand how these structures are produced, we tested the capacity of proteins to direct actin polymerization in a bead assay in vitro and in a mitochondrial-targeting assay in cells. We found that human zyxin and the related protein ActA of Listeria monocytogenes can generate new actin structures in a vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein-dependent (VASP) manner, but independently of the Arp2/3 complex. These results are consistent with the concept that there are multiple actin-polymerization machines in cells. With these simple tests it is possible to probe the specific function of proteins or identify novel molecules that act upon cellular actin polymerization. [less ▲]

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See detailLPP, an actin cytoskeleton protein related to zyxin, harbors a nuclear export signal and transcriptional activation capacity.
Petit, M. M.; Fradelizi, J.; Golsteyn, R. M. et al

in Molecular biology of the cell (2000), 11(1), 117-29

The LPP gene is the preferred translocation partner of the HMGIC gene in a subclass of human benign mesenchymal tumors known as lipomas. Here we have characterized the LPP gene product that shares 41% of ... [more ▼]

The LPP gene is the preferred translocation partner of the HMGIC gene in a subclass of human benign mesenchymal tumors known as lipomas. Here we have characterized the LPP gene product that shares 41% of sequence identity with the focal adhesion protein zyxin. LPP localizes in focal adhesions as well as in cell-to-cell contacts, and it binds VASP, a protein implicated in the control of actin organization. In addition, LPP accumulates in the nucleus of cells upon treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the export factor CRM1. The nuclear export of LPP depends on an N-terminally located leucine-rich sequence that shares sequence homology with well-defined nuclear export signals. Moreover, LPP displays transcriptional activation capacity, as measured by GAL4-based assays. Altogether, these results show that the LPP protein has multifunctional domains and may serve as a scaffold upon which distinct protein complexes are assembled in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. [less ▲]

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