References of "Max, Charles 50002346"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDie technische Mündigkeit von Schüler/-innen zum Ende der Sek. I im internationalen Vergleich – Entwicklung eines Testwerkinstruments und erste Ergebnisse
Fletcher, Stefan; De Vries, Marc; Max, Charles UL

in Journal of Technical Education (2018), 6(4),

An international research team jointly conceived an item development model which was used to develop a new test instrument to measure the technology literacy of secondary school students. This tool was ... [more ▼]

An international research team jointly conceived an item development model which was used to develop a new test instrument to measure the technology literacy of secondary school students. This tool was used to assess the literacy skills of 270 pupils from Germany, Switzerland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and England. The results show that 13 to 16 year old students display a poorly developed technology literacy level only. 25 per cent of the items on average were incorrectly answered with a high certainty sentiment, which suggests, that students do not only lack relevant knowledge in the field of technology but in addition also hold a rela-tively high number of strongly built misconceptions. Interestingly, there are no major differences between countries and gender. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn activity theoretical research lens on inquiry-based learning
Max, Charles UL

in de Vries, Marc J.; Fletcher, Stefan; Kruse, Stefan (Eds.) et al Research in Technology Education: International Approaches. (2018)

Inquiry-based learning and instruction with mobile technologies generate tremendous research interest. To what extent do these tools innovate and transform learning processes, shape individual or ... [more ▼]

Inquiry-based learning and instruction with mobile technologies generate tremendous research interest. To what extent do these tools innovate and transform learning processes, shape individual or collaborative explorations of scientific phenomena, facilitate auto-regulated processes, stimulate creative classroom productions, or support the formation of scientific understanding and critical thinking? That’s exactly where this book chapter gets in. It's purpose is to set up an open, theory-based research framework which allows to empirically study inquiry-based learning and teaching practices in technology education (TE). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Model for Regulating of Ethical Preferences in Machine Ethics
Baniasadi, Zohreh UL; Parent, Xavier UL; Max, Charles UL et al

in Proceedings of International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 125 (36 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElementary science and education within the Luxembourg educational system
Max, Charles UL

in De Vries, Marc J.; Fletcher, Stefan; Kruse, Stefan (Eds.) et al Technology Education Today – International Perspectives (2016)

The article analyses the curricula of elementary technology and science education in fundamental and secondary education, situates its evolution and current implementation in the Luxembourg school context ... [more ▼]

The article analyses the curricula of elementary technology and science education in fundamental and secondary education, situates its evolution and current implementation in the Luxembourg school context and concludes with opportunities for valorising technology and science education across the education system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (13 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInteraction Profiles for an Artificial Conversational Companion
Höhn, Sviatlana UL; Busemann, Stephan; Max, Charles UL et al

Scientific Conference (2015, September)

Using Artificial Companions for tasks requiring long-term interaction like language learning or coaching can be approached by creating local computational models for particular interaction structures, and ... [more ▼]

Using Artificial Companions for tasks requiring long-term interaction like language learning or coaching can be approached by creating local computational models for particular interaction structures, and models reflecting changes in interaction over time. An Artificial Conversational Companion (ACC) that helps to practice conversation in a foreign language is expected to play the role of a language expert in conversation. We apply methods of Conversation Analysis to obtain data- driven models of interaction profiles for language experts and language novices from a corpus of instant messaging based dialogues between native speakers of German and advanced learners of German as a foreign language. We show different ways how the artificial agent can simulate ”doing being expert” in conversation and promote learning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 222 (44 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailICT use at home and at school: A study on 8- to 12-year old students in Luxembourg
Max, Charles UL; Song, Ju-Youn UL; Hack, Nathalie UL

in INTED2015 Proceedings (2015, March)

The proliferation of mobile computing and ubiquitous internet access creates enhanced opportunities for digital activities and interactive engagement in everyday life for adults, youngsters and children ... [more ▼]

The proliferation of mobile computing and ubiquitous internet access creates enhanced opportunities for digital activities and interactive engagement in everyday life for adults, youngsters and children. By introducing mobile devices into formal education contexts, the present study is investigating ICT-enhanced learning opportunities of younger students in their life and school contexts. The focus of this paper is to 1) delineate the ICT environment, that 8- to 12-year old students face in their home context, 2) map the ICT-related practices this age group experiences within the family context, e.g. patterns of usage, frequency, 3) identify the kind of ICT-based activities which kids prefer and in which they are actually engaged, 4) trace differences in ICT-enhanced classroom activities between students with a strong and a weak ICT home background. The analysis combines data from an online survey and interviews with 8- to 12-year old students. All data have been gathered in an ongoing national project on “Creative inquiries with tablet-cloud systems in elementary science”. This project aims at exploring the impact of interactive technologies on inquiry-based learning processes in elementary science education (Max & Hack, 2014; Max & Song, 2014). The results show that the students have large use of ICT equipment at home and extended access to the internet. Children access the web through a wide range of ICT devices (e.g. PC, laptop, tablets or mobile phone). A majority of this age group goes online alone so that their internet activities are not necessarily guided and supervised by parents. Most kids use a range of different ICT devices for specific purposes on a regular basis ranging from simply consuming digital resources such as listening to music or playing games to searching information online up to creating digital content such as taking pictures and/or making videos. Considering their young age (8-12), our results show that sharing digital content through social media activities is somewhat limited. As regards the impact of a strong or weak ICT background on the students’ school-based ICT activities, we can say that both groups show a similar attitude towards ICT practices in school. The tablet-enhanced school activities are complementary to the leisure-driven activities at home and therefor beneficial for both groups of children. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 251 (23 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLernen in Bewegung: iPads im naturwissenschaftlichen Unterricht
Max, Charles UL

in Computer + Unterricht: Lernen und Lehren mit digitalen Medien (2015), 97

Der Artikel beschreibt den Einsatz von iPads im naturwissenschaftlichen Anfangsunterricht. Die Schülerinnen und Schüler nutzen die Geräte zur selbstständigen Aufzeichnung und kreativen Weiterverarbeitung ... [more ▼]

Der Artikel beschreibt den Einsatz von iPads im naturwissenschaftlichen Anfangsunterricht. Die Schülerinnen und Schüler nutzen die Geräte zur selbstständigen Aufzeichnung und kreativen Weiterverarbeitung von Daten wie z.B. Dokumentation von gemeinsamen Untersuchungen mittels Fotos und Videos, Informationsrecherche im Internet, sowie Erstellung multimedialer Präsentationen zum Lerngegenstand. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 239 (11 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detail“And? Did we do nice things?”: Children documenting their emerging inquiries in early science learning
Max, Charles UL; Siry, Christina UL; Kracheel, Martin UL

in Milne, Catherine; Tobin, Kenneth (Eds.) Sociocultural studies and implications for science education: the experiential and the virtual (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPeer Language Learning: Perspectives from Blended, Face-to-Face and Social Media Interactions
Ziegler, Gudrun; Max, Charles UL; Durus, Natalia et al

in Open Education Europa (2014)

This publication gives an overview of peer language learning, from its creation and concepts, to its future in today’s world, implying new technologies such as social media. Part I describes the concepts ... [more ▼]

This publication gives an overview of peer language learning, from its creation and concepts, to its future in today’s world, implying new technologies such as social media. Part I describes the concepts, principles and history of peer language learning (PLL), followed by a discussion around the expansion of PLL through social media, exposing the new dimensions which emerged with the evolution of the Internet and web 2.0. Part II focuses on analysing 14 instances of naturally-occurring PLL adult interactions (corpus PEER). Both the concepts and phenomena discussed in Part I, and the analysis of PLL interactions of Part II feed into the recommendations, which constitute Part III. The current publication is of interest for: PLL pluri-linguals who could use the publication to integrate peer learning into their language learning, drawing from previous PLL experiences; for teachers and coordinators of language learning programs; and also for researchers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (14 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeveloping spaces for technology-mediated inquiry in education
Max, Charles UL

Scientific Conference (2014, August 28)

Interactive communication technologies enter our everyday activities at an impressive pace. The proliferation of mobile computing devices coupled to a ubiquitous connectivity initiates a “historical shift ... [more ▼]

Interactive communication technologies enter our everyday activities at an impressive pace. The proliferation of mobile computing devices coupled to a ubiquitous connectivity initiates a “historical shift to digital” and profoundly changes the ways we organize our daily life, communicate, interact, learn or gather information. Digital media also shape the life contexts of our children, who keep on using interactive tools from game-playing to explicit learning activities. This issue creates a growing need to investigate the potential of mobile computing devices in educational contexts and analyse its impact on pedagogical, organisational and technological challenges, the school communities are dealing with. The present paper is discussing findings from a research project that studies the use of tablet-cloud systems in fundamental schools. Luxembourg’s schools and homes are well equipped with computers and internet access. However, little is known about promising strategies and existing barriers to integrate mobile devices effectively into educational contexts. Our research supplies schools with tablet-cloud systems in order to study the impact on collaborative and student-centred learning activities. The project’s core research foci put attention on processes of a) student-led inquiries and creative productions and b) the empowerment of teachers. Prior research often reveals a reluctance of teachers to use IC technologies in classroom activities. Often, teachers experience a lack of digital literacy skills to support students in using interactive devices in classroom inquiries and hands-on activities. This contribution analyses how ICT-enhanced learning practices challenge existing notions of educational achievement, learning, student engagement and participation among the involved teachers. Our transformative research approach puts specific emphasis on threads and opportunities that members of four fundamental school communities experience concerning technological, organisational and pedagogical innovation. We ground our developmental work on the concept of ‘expansive learning’, where “learners learn something that is not yet there. In other words, the learners construct a new object and concept for their collective activity, and implement this new object and concept in practice“ (Engeström & Sannino 2010, 2). Cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) offers a sound theoretical and methodological framework for implementing and investigating innovation in organisations and institutions, especially in order to interrelate individual and collective actions. CHAT considers both as dialectically interrelated, that is to say, they can be understood only historically and in interaction with each other. The research data are gathered by a multi-method approach, which combines video-ethnographic data of students’ classroom tasks, multimodal analysis of students’ multimodal productions and self-recordings (on the cloud), video-taped stimulated recall sessions with students about their own learning. Excerpts from these data sets are discussed with teachers in developmental work sessions to identify current barriers and successful strategies to integrate technology in learning and teaching practices. The outcomes of our analysis allow to identify potential levers for increasing the use of mobile computing devices in educational contexts and expand the object of socio-digital activity systems in the field of education. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalysing tablet-enhanced inquiries in elementary science education
Max, Charles UL; Song, Ju-Youn UL

Scientific Conference (2014, August 18)

This paper presents primary findings of a study on inquiry-based learning with tablet-cloud systems in elementary science education. The study is investigating the situated ways in which 8 to 12 year old ... [more ▼]

This paper presents primary findings of a study on inquiry-based learning with tablet-cloud systems in elementary science education. The study is investigating the situated ways in which 8 to 12 year old students (n=240) make sense of science phenomena through ICT-enhanced inquiry processes. In science education, inquiry is emphasised both as a means and an outcome. Student-centred inquiry is a promising way of learning that encourages students to explore the world and engage in critical thinking. Scientific inquiry skills are the core outcome of probably any science education. After proliferating in everyday contexts, high performing mobile devices are entering learning environments right now. But up to date, little is known about how to integrate these devices into inquiry-based science learning. Our study analyses how mobile devices re-shape the learning landscape of the inquiry-based science classroom, i.e., to what extent they facilitate the learner-led exploration and understanding of scientific phenomena and the formation of scientific thinking. Evidence is gathered through data collected by researchers (video recordings from science lessons) and students (uploading multimodal classroom productions on the internal school cloud). The preliminary analysis shows that integrating tablets into the science class is increasing the student-initiated gathering of own data and supporting interactive forms of inquiring. Moreover, technology-enhanced inquiry learning is becoming more learner-centred and open when the use of tablets is guided by a series of well-designed hands-on activities together with multiple interaction opportunities (collective or collaborative). Students quickly acknowledge the potential of these devices for gathering information, (re)-evaluating own explanations, fully documenting their science investigations, communicating targeted inquiry results or reflecting on their learning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLearning with tablet-cloud systems in elementary science education
Max, Charles UL; Song, Ju-Youn UL

in IATED (Ed.) EDULEARN14 Proceedings (2014, July 06)

Mobile and interactive technologies offer sophisticated learning opportunities in everyday life so that some authors speak about a new era of mobile learning. Especially tablets fascinate people of all ... [more ▼]

Mobile and interactive technologies offer sophisticated learning opportunities in everyday life so that some authors speak about a new era of mobile learning. Especially tablets fascinate people of all age and induce novel ways to interact, create and communicate. After proliferating in everyday contexts, these high performing mobile devices are currently entering formal learning environments. First experiences in classrooms describe tablets as promising means to improve learning in respect of 21st century challenges. A myriad of educational applications is being offered for all kind of classroom use. But up to date, less is known about opportunities how to integrate this flexible and versatile tool into inquiry-based learning approaches thanks to the device’s potential to a) gather own data, b) facilitate multimodal and multimedia productions c) back interactive forms of collaborative learning. Our study analyses how tablet-cloud systems re-shape the learning landscape of inquiry-oriented science classrooms, i.e. to what extent do tablets facilitate student-led explorations and explanations of scientific phenomena, support the formation of scientific thinking and stimulate creative classroom productions. We are particularly focussed on the situated ways which 8-12 year old students (n=240) create to make sense of science topics in tablet-enhanced inquiry activities. In science education, inquiry is emphasised both as a method and an outcome. Student-centred inquiry activities are advocated as a promising way of learning, encouraging students to actively explore the world and engage in critical thinking. Inquiry activities amplify the development of inquiry skills, which are core outcomes of probably any science education curriculum. That’s why we focus on how a series of learner-centred pedagogical choices of the teacher coupled with the use of tablet-cloud systems facilitates creative inquiry processes. Evidence is gathered through different data sets, collected either by researchers (video recordings from science lessons, stimulated recall interviews) and/or students (uploads of own videos and multimodal documents on the internal school cloud). The various kinds of data are triangulated in order to create a multi-perspective understanding of the processes occurring in the tablet-supported practices. The preliminary analysis shows that integrating tablets into the science class increases the gathering of student-initiated data and supports interactive forms of student inquiries. Students quickly acknowledge the potential of these devices for gathering information, documenting their science investigations or hands-on activities, (re)-evaluating own explanations for science phenomena, communicating targeted inquiry results or reflecting on their learning. Technology-enhanced inquiry activities shift easily to a more learner-centred and open form of inquiry, when the use of tablets is encouraged by a series of well-designed hands-on activities together with rich interaction opportunities (collective or collaborative). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImplementing a culture of creative Inquiry with ipads in elementary science education
Max, Charles UL; Hack, Nathalie UL

in Pixel (Ed.) Conference proceedings. New perspectives in science education (2014, March 20)

This paper is discussing first outcomes of an ongoing research (2012-2015) about creative inquiry-based learning with tablet-cloud systems in elementary science education. The study is investigating the ... [more ▼]

This paper is discussing first outcomes of an ongoing research (2012-2015) about creative inquiry-based learning with tablet-cloud systems in elementary science education. The study is investigating the situated ways in which 8 to 12 year old students make sense of science phenomena through creative inquiry practices enhanced by tablets and cloud systems. Inquiry can be defined as an active creation of knowledge through the pursuit of open-ended questions, data gathering and related explanations from evidence. Inquiry-based school activities constitute a learner-centred context for students to develop understanding of scientific concepts and basic inquiry abilities as for example posing and refining research questions, planning and managing an investigation or analysing and communicating results. From early childhood onwards, children explore their environments and actively build knowledge through interest-driven inquiry. New media devices may support or even extend this inclination as they offer the potential to extend the domain and range of children’s inquiry. Especially, new tablet-computers include an array of features, which allow to capture, collect, treat and visualize a span of multimodal data related to science phenomena under exploration. Applications enable students to merge data from their own investigations with content they retrieve from digital sources. This student-generated content can be easily shared with teachers and other groups through the school-based cloud system or disseminated as final outcomes to a private or public audience. The paper discusses the potential of tablet-computers to facilitate student-centred exploration of science phenomena and the formation of scientific thinking in school-based science activities. Evidence is based on different kind of data collected either by students on the internal school cloud (multimodal classroom productions, self-recordings about their inquiry approaches) or by researchers (video data from science lessons, video-stimulated recall interviews with students). Outcomes of our analysis reveal that mobile devices create extended opportunities for skill development in science classrooms. We evidence an increase of self-directed, inquiry-oriented and interest-driven learning skills. The tablet-cloud systems stimulate student engagement and self-expression, i.e., explanations from self-collected evidence, evidence-based argumentation and justification of own approaches. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe sciPADS project
Max, Charles UL; Hack, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2013, November)

The sciPADS project is conducting empirical research with children age 8-12 of Luxembourgish elementary schools using a tablet-cloud system. The study centres on students’ processes mediated by ipads such ... [more ▼]

The sciPADS project is conducting empirical research with children age 8-12 of Luxembourgish elementary schools using a tablet-cloud system. The study centres on students’ processes mediated by ipads such as inquiry-based learning and multimodal creations. The cloud system enables students, teachers, and researchers to share generated content across multiple platforms and across the school borders. Our data collection, spanning a two-year learning cycle, comprises the students’ multimodal creations and related commentary; recordings of classroom activities performed with Ipads; data from questionnaires, polls and online surveys; audio-visual recordings of recall-interviews with the students and of regular project meetings with teachers. The presentation's driving question concerns the methodological framework for conducting this investigation, i.e., gather a broad spread of data about the project foci, but also gain some profound insights on the learning process of the students. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (13 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe collective construction of a science unit: Framing curricula as emergent from Kindergarteners’ wonderings
Siry, Christina UL; Max, Charles UL

in Science Education (2013), 97(6), 878-902

This ethnographic research examines how children enact developing understandings in science through multiple interactions. Grounded in sociocultural theoretical frameworks, we consider learning to be a ... [more ▼]

This ethnographic research examines how children enact developing understandings in science through multiple interactions. Grounded in sociocultural theoretical frameworks, we consider learning to be a social, cultural practice, with understandings as co-constructed between participants through talk and in interactions. With these underpinning frameworks, we have explored water activities in kindergarten and examined how children and teachers collaboratively constructed science investigations to explore questions as they emerged from open-ended activities. The analysis revealed how children's investigations were mediated by their own speculations and explanations. Our primary claim herein is that children's questions, speculations, and insights were used collaboratively by teachers and children, and as such, became a structure in this classroom that supported children in taking agency. In this process, science curricula and working theories on science phenomena were generated. This was facilitated by teachers’ openness to emergent approaches for their science curriculum. Through a discussion of these claims, an emphasis is placed on the value of students being positioned as co-constructors of science curricula. Furthermore, the integral role of the teacher in emergent curricula is introduced and developed as critical for being responsive to students’ interests and insights. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTalking ideas into being: Reasoning about science phenomena in the elementary classroom.
Max, Charles UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August 30)

The paper emphasises processes of growing understanding and reasoning about water-related phenomena in open inquiry-based science activities. It highlights the interplay of multiple cultural resources ... [more ▼]

The paper emphasises processes of growing understanding and reasoning about water-related phenomena in open inquiry-based science activities. It highlights the interplay of multiple cultural resources, which 4 to 8 year old children from diverse sociocultural backgrounds draw upon, to create shared meaning and attention when ‘doing science’ as cultural enactment in classroom contexts. The rationale is to deepen our understanding about the nature of learning from a dialectical perspective, i.e. how processes of personal inquiry and collective knowledge creation mutually develop. ‘Doing science’ unfolds through a dynamic, non-linear and creative combination of culturally given tools and children’s specific multimodal repertoires. The research draws close attention on the context-sensitive organization of this interactional achievement, i.e. the quality of the interactionally achieved convergence of multiple repertoires, their context-sensitive use and creative transformations The study is supported by a multi-method framework allowing to embrace multiple perspectives on the children’s inquiry processes. Two excerpts are discussed in detail – one from kindergarten, one from 2d grade – which address the children’s inquiry processes in different ways. The data reveal an astonishing depth of discussion and scientific reasoning of children at this age. Children’s critical conversations display awareness of relevant discourse elements and related explanations from other curriculum areas, which are confronted and actively worked into each other as an active accomplishment done by the children in dialogical interchange. The study is of substantial significance for conceiving sustainable science learning environments in multilingual and -cultural school contexts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCreative Inquiry with ipads in elementary science education.
Max, Charles UL; Hack, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August 29)

The present paper emphasizes results of an ongoing research project (2012-2015 about creative inquiry with mobile technologies in elementary science education. The analytical lens is directed towards the ... [more ▼]

The present paper emphasizes results of an ongoing research project (2012-2015 about creative inquiry with mobile technologies in elementary science education. The analytical lens is directed towards the situated ways in which 8 to 12 year old students (n=300) make sense of science phenomena through creative inquiry practices. The project is supplying classes with ipads and a secure internal cloud service. These devices are equipped with a range of sensors, which allow students to capture, collect, treat and visualize a broad range of data. Applications permit to combine these collaborative inquiry data with content from print or digital media sources. The internal cloud facilitates to comfortably share all kind of data between students and teachers and to disseminate final products to a private or public audience. The study explores how mobile devices facilitate the understanding of scientific phenomena and the formation of scientific thinking. A core concern deals with processes of creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration as emphasized by the 21st century skill frameworks. To achieve this goal, classroom activities are recorded through video data once per trimester and for two consecutive school years. The research analyses also how the students’ productions come into being by considering the versions students store on the internal cloud server. Moreover, the ipads allow students to record themselves their learning and comment on their inquiry approaches. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 120 (5 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTowards a Proto-Language of Emotions (?) - Response Cries as an Interactional Achievement
Albanese, Claudia UL; Max, Charles UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August)

"We provide micro-interactional analysis of a series of motion gaming sessions (Gregersen, 2011) with a focus on response cries (Goffman, 1978, 1981). We use Conversation Analysis (CA) to analyze ... [more ▼]

"We provide micro-interactional analysis of a series of motion gaming sessions (Gregersen, 2011) with a focus on response cries (Goffman, 1978, 1981). We use Conversation Analysis (CA) to analyze interactions in their situatedness and moment-by-moment unfolding (Schegloff, Sacks and Jefferson, 1977). We bring evidence that, although speakers sometimes communicate by means of non-lexicalized, subvocalized, interjections and vocalizations, they still manage to understand and coordinate each other. Extracts are taken from two corpora. One is the (2010) SISS-Corpus, consisting of eight hours of video-recordings of groups of teenage students filmed in their school while playing digital games on a Nintendo Wii console. Participants speak their L1 and select different socio-stratic varieties (Tempesta, 1995; 2000; 2005) of Italian. The second corpus (2009-2012) Multi-Wii- consists of eleven hours of video-recordings of groups of multilingual speakers recorded at University of Luxembourg. Participants select English, French and German (L2) as lingua franca. Data show that response cries develop into an ‘intersubjective’ (Schegloff, 1991; Aarsand and Aronsson, 2009) language, and constitute a mutually understandable form of interaction shared by participants. In an evolutionary and developmental perspective, response cries may be thought of as a physiological, vocalized protolanguage of emotions, speakers use socially, for indexical purposes (Heritage and Raymond, 2005); to express stance (Heritage, 2012), and co-construct emotion as an interactional achievement (Schegloff, 1988). The contribution discusses the process by which cognitive –emotional- states are brought to life via embodiment in interaction (Goodwin, 2011) through language and other physiological evolutions like gestures and facial kinetics (Birdwhistell, 1970)." [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 148 (7 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Biosemiotics of Facial Kinetics
Albanese, Claudia UL; Max, Charles UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL

Scientific Conference (2013, June)

We call ‘languaging’ ( Fell and Russell, 1994) the complex-ecological, dynamic core-interaction of multiple semiotic resources to embody (Streeck, Goodwin and LeBaron, 2011) meaning in communication. We ... [more ▼]

We call ‘languaging’ ( Fell and Russell, 1994) the complex-ecological, dynamic core-interaction of multiple semiotic resources to embody (Streeck, Goodwin and LeBaron, 2011) meaning in communication. We discuss the physiological emergence of intentionality and consciousness through bio-semiotic markers of meaning in the form of facial kinetics (Birdwhistell, 1970), with a specific focus on eyebrow movements. We adopt a discursive-interactional approach to a set of ‘semi-interactional’ data, in order to investigate semantic, syntactic and pragmatic aspects of self-organization, bio-communication and anthropogenetics. A series of thirty-six short, -quasi-monologic- interviews (1.30 minutes each on average) was run on a mixed group of multilingual speakers at University of Luxembourg. Four sets can here be distinguished: twenty participants with different L1s spoke either English or French as L2 (ten and ten respectively). Eight English L1 speakers and eight French L1 speakers spoke English as L1 and French as L1 respectively. Data analysis reveals that, regardless of whether speakers use their L1 or an L2, there is consistency and systematics across languages, as for the placement of eyebrow movements on self-repair (Schegloff, 1977), material following hesitation and discourse markers (Schiffrin, 1986). In line with biogenetic structuralism (Laughlin and d'Aquili 1974), these results suggest that, although each living organism develops own ‘cognized’ Umwelt (von Uexkull, 1973), there are universal operational structures characterizing human language (Wierzbicka, 1992), and cognition. Aspects in the sequential organization of talk (Sacks, Schegloff, Jefferson) and linguistic-kinesic interdependence (Birdwhistell, 1970) may result from complex socio-genetic evolution of interactants’ nervous systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (2 UL)
See detailLearning 2.0 in Higher Education. What pathways should academia take now?.
Max, Charles UL

Presentation (2013, February 07)

New media have become an essential part of everyday life and regular users are labeled as ‘(inter)net generation’ (Tapscott, 1998; Buckingham, 2007; Montgomery, 2007; Beetham & Sharpe, 2007) or ‘digital ... [more ▼]

New media have become an essential part of everyday life and regular users are labeled as ‘(inter)net generation’ (Tapscott, 1998; Buckingham, 2007; Montgomery, 2007; Beetham & Sharpe, 2007) or ‘digital natives’ (Prensky, 2001, 2009, 2010; Benett et al., 2008; Helsper et al., 2010). Interactive new media (Manovich, 2003; Crook, 2008; Redecker et al., 2009) and the social web (Bevan, 2010) are blurring the boundaries between learning and social or leisure activities. By transforming conventional media monologues into social media dialogues, they are expanding opportunities of collaborative authoring and peer exchange within communities of prod-users (Bruns, 2008; Rheingold, 2008). They generate a high growth of social interactions and mutual exchanges among members (Ito et al., 2009; Kirschner & Karpinski, 2010; Eynon & Malmberg, 2011). Participants feel some degree of social connection with one another, mutually value contributions and support less competent members through tutoring practices. On the basis of this “participatory culture” (Jenkins et al., 2007) radical new learning opportunities (Ala-Mutka, 2010) take shape. The participatory and active role, which these tools allow users to take, make them interesting for learner-centred approaches in higher education. The regular use of ICT and web technologies (Anderson, 2007) in educational institutions is far from common and rarely goes beyond rudimentary functions or the use of limited resources (Cox et al., 2003a, 2003b; Cuban, 2003). The present contribution discusses results achieved by students using web 2.0 applications within academic programs such as blogs, video sharing tools and social net working sites. They evidence beneficial effects on processes of learning, socialisation and conviviality (Caire 2010) and skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and collaboration as emphasised by 21st century frameworks (Voogt & Pareja Roblin, 2012) . Furthermore, the contribution will raise questions about barriers and strategies for integrating learning 2.0 effectively into higher educational contexts. It emphasises the systemic tensions to overcome, pedagogical practices to promote and conviviality potentials (Caire, 2010) to stimulate by fair digital participations, collaborations and interactions in highly multilingual and multicultural contexts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (11 UL)