References of "Leist, Anja 50002195"
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See detailHumor is associated with happiness, but which type of humor is most beneficial?
Leist, Anja UL

in Bormans, Leo (Ed.) World Book of Happiness 2.0 (in press)

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See detailPopulation aging, demographic trends and consequences for long-term care
Leist, Anja UL

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (in press)

This chapter reviews recent projections related to the aging of populations, developments in health expectancy and disability, and associated trends in need for and provision of long-term care, focusing ... [more ▼]

This chapter reviews recent projections related to the aging of populations, developments in health expectancy and disability, and associated trends in need for and provision of long-term care, focusing on the developments in Europe but mentioning worldwide trends where possible. First, I present demographic trends in changing age structure of populations, expected costs of those changes, and discuss how innovative measures such as the ‘real elderly dependency ratio’ could offer a more balanced view on those trends. Second, projections of healthy life expectancy and time spent with morbidity and disability are presented. Then possible limitations of those projections are discussed, especially regarding recent evidence on changing incidence of dementia, and the possible further reductions in incidence if unfavorable lifestyle and health behaviours were reduced. After that, I will delineate demographic trends in need for assistance with care, and their implications for both formal and informal long-term care provision and costs. Specifically, a ‘care gap’ both in the provision of formal and informal care has been foreseen for several countries. Lastly, I discuss some trends and phenomena in long-term care provision which may influence the trends in long-term care needs and provision. In particular, estimated care gaps could become less threatening if the trend of migration of trained and untrained caregivers to provide live-in and institutional care in understaffed countries will continue, and if technological innovations will reduce care needs by enabling persons with disabilities to carry out activities of daily living autonomously. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic Downturns, Retirement and Long-Term Cognitive Function Among Older Americans
Hessel, Philipp; Riumallo-Herl, Carlos; Leist, Anja UL et al

in Journals of Gerontology Series B : Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences (2017)

Objective: Workers approaching retirement may be particularly vulnerable to economic downturns. This study assesses whether exposure to economic downturns around retirement age leads to poorer cognitive ... [more ▼]

Objective: Workers approaching retirement may be particularly vulnerable to economic downturns. This study assesses whether exposure to economic downturns around retirement age leads to poorer cognitive function in later life. Method: Longitudinal data for 13,577 individuals in the Health and Retirement Study were linked to unemployment rates in state of residence. Random- and fixed-effect models were used to examine whether downturns at 55–64 years of age were associated with cognitive functioning levels and decline at ≥65 years, measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised. Results: Longer exposure to downturns at 55–64 years of age was associated with lower levels of cognitive function at ≥65 years. Compared to individuals experiencing only up to 1 year in a downturn at 55–64 years of age, individuals experiencing two downturns at these ages had 0.09 point (95% Confidence Interval [CI, −0.17, −0.02]) lower cognitive functioning scores at ≥65 years (3 years: b = −0.17, 95%CI [−0.29, −0.06]; 4 years: b = −0.14, 95%CI [−0.25, −0.02]; ≥5 years: b = −0.22, 95%CI [−0.38, −0.06]). Downturns at 55–64 years of age were not associated with rates of cognitive decline. Discussion: Exposure to downturns around retirement is associated with a long-lasting decline in cognitive function in later life. Policies mitigating the impact of downturns on older workers may help to maintain cognitive function in later life. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial inequalities in dementia care, cure, and research
Leist, Anja UL

in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2017)

Social inequalities in dementia can be found in diagnosis, cure, care, and research. Less advantaged groups are women, persons with ethnic minority status, lower income, lower education, and living in ... [more ▼]

Social inequalities in dementia can be found in diagnosis, cure, care, and research. Less advantaged groups are women, persons with ethnic minority status, lower income, lower education, and living in more deprived or rural areas. These social inequalities suggest that funding of research and medical and care expenses related to dementia may not be equitably allocated to those in need, even in the most advanced countries. Experience from the field of heart disease gives an estimate on the timescale and efforts it takes to successfully address social inequalities related to gender. Strong concerted efforts will be needed to mitigate social inequalities in dementia. [less ▲]

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See detailDigitaler Anschluss: Warum soziale Medien auch im höheren Alter helfen können
Leist, Anja UL

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailTesting persistence of cohort effects in the epidemiology of suicide: an age-period-cohort hysteresis model
Chauvel, Louis UL; Leist, Anja UL; Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Birth cohort effects in suicide rates are well established, but to date there is no methodological approach or framework to test the temporal stability of these effects. We use the APC-Detrended (APCD ... [more ▼]

Birth cohort effects in suicide rates are well established, but to date there is no methodological approach or framework to test the temporal stability of these effects. We use the APC-Detrended (APCD) model to robustly estimate intensity of cohort effects identifying non-linear trends (or ‘detrended’ fluctuations) in suicide rates. The new APC-Hysteresis (APCH) model tests temporal stability of cohort effects. Analysing suicide rates in 25 WHO countries (periods 1970–74 to 2005–09; ages 20–24 to 70–79) with the APCD method, we find that country-specific birth cohort membership plays an important role in suicide rates. Among 25 countries, we detect 12 nations that show deep contrasts among cohort-specific suicide rates including Italy, Australia and the United States. The APCH method shows that cohort fluctuations are not stable across the life course but decline in Spain, France and Australia, whereas they remain stable in Italy, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. We discuss the Spanish case with elevated suicide mortality of cohorts born 1965-1975 which declines with age, and the opposite case of the United States, where the identified cohort effects of those born around 1960 increase smoothly, but statistically significant across the life course. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction to the Special Issue on Ageing and Well-being
Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka; Leist, Anja UL

in Social Inquiry into Well-Being (2016), 2(1), 1-3

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 UL)
See detailMaintaining cognitive function starts early in life
Leist, Anja UL

Speeches/Talks (2016)

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See detailThe World Young Leaders in Dementia Network - Goals and Activities
Leist, Anja UL

Speeches/Talks (2016)

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See detailTackling the global challenge of dementia
Leist, Anja UL

Speeches/Talks (2016)

The talk gives an overview of the current activities of the World Young Leaders in Dementia and the newly formed World Dementia Council, along with recent findings in research on dementia (1) from a ... [more ▼]

The talk gives an overview of the current activities of the World Young Leaders in Dementia and the newly formed World Dementia Council, along with recent findings in research on dementia (1) from a social epidemiological and life course perspective, (2) with regard to societal and economic costs of dementia, and (3) with regard to delaying onset and progression of dementia. [less ▲]

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See detailInequality in old age cognition across the world
Olivera, Javier; Leist, Anja UL; Chauvel, Louis UL

in PAA website (2016)

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See detailIs income equality also better for your cognitive health? A multilevel analysis on trajectories of cognitive function at older ages
Leist, Anja UL; Chauvel, Louis UL

in PAA website (2016)

This paper contributes to research on contextual associations with older-age cognitive function by investigating to which extent country-level income inequality is associated with older-age cognitive ... [more ▼]

This paper contributes to research on contextual associations with older-age cognitive function by investigating to which extent country-level income inequality is associated with older-age cognitive function and decline. Data came from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), providing information on cognitive function (fluency, immediate and delayed recall) of respondents aged 50-80 years coming from a total of 16 European countries that participated in at least two waves of SHARE. A total of 44,303 observations were available at first and second measurement, 13,509 observations at third measurement, and 9,736 observations at fourth measurement. Three-level hierarchical models (measurements nested within individuals nested within countries) were run, showing that income inequality was negatively associated with cognitive level but not with decline. The findings suggest that income inequality is not associated with cognitive trajectories. Mechanisms of maintaining cognitive function at older ages may not be susceptible to country-level income inequalities. [less ▲]

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See detailCohort factors impinging on suicide rates in the United States, 1990-2010
Chauvel, Louis UL; Leist, Anja UL; Smith, Herbert

in PAA server (2016)

We use CDC microdata on cause of death and CPS data on populations by age to create suicide rates for five-year age groups at five-year intervals, further cross-classified by race/ethnicity, education ... [more ▼]

We use CDC microdata on cause of death and CPS data on populations by age to create suicide rates for five-year age groups at five-year intervals, further cross-classified by race/ethnicity, education, and marital status. We examine the suicide history 1990-2010 of U.S. birth cohorts, net of age and cohort linear trends. These de-trended cohort deviations follow familiar patterns: most pronounced in the Baby Boom, least pronounced during the Baby Bust, they illustrate the so-called Easterlin effect. Suicide rates for women show similar patterns as suicide patterns for men. We show persistence of those effects net of micro factors (especially education and marriage) implicated in suicide behavior and correlated at the macro level with relative cohort size. Analysis of suicide patterns over time for high- and low-educated men and women shows that white men with low education face a sharp increase, significantly above the linear time trends, in suicide rates among cohorts born between 1955 and 1970. This bump is mostly unrelated to secular trends of increasing average educational attainment rates, at least if no interaction between age and cohort is involved in the explanation. No obvious pattern related to cohort size is found for African-American high- and low-educated men, which makes sense given the very different historical dynamics for this minority sub-population. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive inequalities in later life: Cross-country differences in the education-cognition gradient
Leist, Anja UL

in Gerontologist (2016), 56(S3), 428-429

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 UL)
See detailEconomic recessions and cognitive function in older age. Evidence from SHARE and HRS
Leist, Anja UL

Presentation (2015, December)

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See detailDementia and cognitive function in old age
Leist, Anja UL

Speeches/Talks (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 UL)
See detailEconomic recessions and later-life cognitive function. Evidence from SHARE and HRS
Leist, Anja UL

Presentation (2015, June 03)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 UL)