References of "Le Nevez, Adam 40000415"
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See detailPlurilinguisme et Formation des Enseignants: Une approche critique
Ehrhart, Sabine UL; Hélot, Christine; Le Nevez, Adam UL

Book published by Peter Lang (2010)

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See detailNegotiating Plurilingualism in the Classroom
Le Nevez, Adam UL; Hélot, Christine; Ehrhart, Sabine UL

in Ehrhart, Sabine; Hélot, Christine; Le Nevez, Adam (Eds.) Plurilinguisme et Formation des Enseignants: une approche critique Plurilingualism and Teacher Education : A Critical Approach (2010)

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See detailReview of J. Cenoz, Towards Multilingual Education: Basque Educational Research from an International Perspective
Le Nevez, Adam UL

in Australian Review of Applied Linguistics (2010), 33(2), 201-204

In Australia debates about language policy and language education are frequently contextualised in a monolingual language ideology. While Australia is a richly multicultural nation where many people are ... [more ▼]

In Australia debates about language policy and language education are frequently contextualised in a monolingual language ideology. While Australia is a richly multicultural nation where many people are bi- or multilingual, in educational contexts, as well as in broader society, what ultimately matters is how well one has acquired standard Australian English. The languages of migrant and indigenous communities remain peripheral to a fundamentally monolingual sense of Australian identity. You don’t need to be bilingual to be Australian; it’s fine to be monolingual, as long as that language is English. [less ▲]

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See detailRethinking diversity and difference in French language practices
Le Nevez, Adam UL

in Language Policy (2008), 7(4), 309-322

This paper contributes to a debate on linguistic identity and social participation in France by providing a critical reading of language policy and practice. It challenges the notion that France is a ... [more ▼]

This paper contributes to a debate on linguistic identity and social participation in France by providing a critical reading of language policy and practice. It challenges the notion that France is a linguistically homogenous nation where a standardised French language is universally practiced and, rather, seeks to reframe linguistic diversity and heterogeneity as fundamental and legitimate constitutive features of French society. In exploring diversity from this critical perspective, the paper looks to the ways in which a number of artists and language activists are deliberately and consciously transgressing normative notions of French to affirm the legitimacy of their alterity and difference. The paper does not make an argument against the legitimacy or social value of standard French, but rather argues in favour of a more critical and inclusive approach to cultural and linguistic difference in France. [less ▲]

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