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See detailEffect of endogenous mutant and wild-type PINK1 on Parkin in fibroblasts from Parkinson disease patients.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Grünewald, Anne UL; Seibler, Philip et al

in Human molecular genetics (2010), 19(16), 3124-37

Mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine-threonine kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal-recessive forms of Parkinson disease (PD ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine-threonine kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal-recessive forms of Parkinson disease (PD). Both are involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and protection from multiple stressors. Recently, Parkin was demonstrated to be recruited to impaired mitochondria in a PINK1-dependent manner, where it triggers mitophagy. Using primary human dermal fibroblasts originating from PD patients with various PINK1 mutations, we showed at the endogenous level that (i) PINK1 regulates the stress-induced decrease of endogenous Parkin; (ii) mitochondrially localized PINK1 mediates the stress-induced mitochondrial translocation of Parkin; (iii) endogenous PINK1 is stabilized on depolarized mitochondria; and (iv) mitochondrial accumulation of full-length PINK1 is sufficient but not necessary for the stress-induced loss of Parkin signal and its mitochondrial translocation. Furthermore, we showed that different stressors, depolarizing or non-depolarizing, led to the same effect on detectable Parkin levels and its mitochondrial targeting. Although this effect on Parkin was independent of the mitochondrial membrane potential, we demonstrate a differential effect of depolarizing versus non-depolarizing stressors on endogenous levels of PINK1. Our study shows the necessity to introduce an environmental factor, i.e. stress, to visualize the differences in the interaction of PINK1 and Parkin in mutants versus controls. Establishing human fibroblasts as a suitable model for studying this interaction, we extend data from animal and other cellular models and provide experimental evidence for the generally held notion of PD as a condition with a combined genetic and environmental etiology. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical spectrum of homozygous and heterozygous PINK1 mutations in a large German family with Parkinson disease: role of a single hit?
Hedrich, Katja; Hagenah, Johann; Djarmati, Ana et al

in Archives of neurology (2006), 63(6), 833-8

BACKGROUND: Although homozygous mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene have been unequivocally associated with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), the role of single heterozygous ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although homozygous mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene have been unequivocally associated with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), the role of single heterozygous PINK1 mutations is less clear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of homozygous and heterozygous PINK1 mutations in a large German pedigree (family W). DESIGN: Mutation analysis of PINK1 and results of standardized neurological and motor examination by 3 independent movement disorder specialists, including blinded video rating. SETTINGS: University of Lubeck. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty family members. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The PINK1 genotype and PD status of all family members. RESULTS: The index patient of family W carried a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1366C>T; p.Q456X) and presented with a phenotype closely resembling idiopathic PD but with an onset at 39 years of age. The family included a total of 4 affected homozygous members (age, 60-71 years; age at onset, 39-61 years), 6 members with slight or mild signs of PD (affected) and a heterozygous mutation (age, 31-49 years), and 5 unaffected heterozygous mutation carriers (age, 34-44 years). Although none of the heterozygous affected family members was aware of their signs (asymptomatic), the clinical findings were unequivocal and predominantly or exclusively present on their dominant right-hand side, eg, unilaterally reduced or absent arm swing and unilateral rigidity. The heterozygous members were all considerably younger than the affected homozygous mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Heterozygous PINK1 mutations may predispose to PD, as was previously suggested by the presence of dopamine hypometabolism in asymptomatic mutation carriers. Long-term follow-up of our large family W provides an excellent opportunity to further evaluate the role of single heterozygous PINK1 mutations later in life, which will have major implications on genetic counseling. [less ▲]

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