References of "Klein, Jacques 50002098"
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See detailYou Cannot Fix What You Cannot Find! An Investigation of Fault Localization Bias in Benchmarking Automated Program Repair Systems
Liu, Kui UL; Koyuncu, Anil UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in The 12th IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST-2019) (2019, April 24)

Properly benchmarking Automated Program Repair (APR) systems should contribute to the development and adoption of the research outputs by practitioners. To that end, the research community must ensure ... [more ▼]

Properly benchmarking Automated Program Repair (APR) systems should contribute to the development and adoption of the research outputs by practitioners. To that end, the research community must ensure that it reaches significant milestones by reliably comparing state-of-the-art tools for a better understanding of their strengths and weaknesses. In this work, we identify and investigate a practical bias caused by the fault localization (FL) step in a repair pipeline. We propose to highlight the different fault localization configurations used in the literature, and their impact on APR systems when applied to the Defects4J benchmark. Then, we explore the performance variations that can be achieved by "tweaking'' the FL step. Eventually, we expect to create a new momentum for (1) full disclosure of APR experimental procedures with respect to FL, (2) realistic expectations of repairing bugs in Defects4J, as well as (3) reliable performance comparison among the state-of-the-art APR systems, and against the baseline performance results of our thoroughly assessed kPAR repair tool. Our main findings include: (a) only a subset of Defects4J bugs can be currently localized by commonly-used FL techniques; (b) current practice of comparing state-of-the-art APR systems (i.e., counting the number of fixed bugs) is potentially misleading due to the bias of FL configurations; and (c) APR authors do not properly qualify their performance achievement with respect to the different tuning parameters implemented in APR systems. [less ▲]

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See detailShould You Consider Adware as Malware in Your Study?
Gao, Jun UL; Li, Li; Kong, Pingfan UL et al

in 26th edition of the IEEE International Conference on Software Analysis, Evolution and Reengineering (2019, February 24)

Empirical validations of research approaches eventually require a curated ground truth. In studies related to Android malware, such a ground truth is built by leveraging Anti-Virus (AV) scanning reports ... [more ▼]

Empirical validations of research approaches eventually require a curated ground truth. In studies related to Android malware, such a ground truth is built by leveraging Anti-Virus (AV) scanning reports which are often provided free through online services such as VirusTotal. Unfortunately, these reports do not offer precise information for appropriately and uniquely assigning classes to samples in app datasets: AV engines indeed do not have a consensus on specifying information in labels. Furthermore, labels often mix information related to families, types, etc. In particular, the notion of “adware” is currently blurry when it comes to maliciousness. There is thus a need to thoroughly investigate cases where adware samples can actually be associated with malware (e.g., because they are tagged as adware but could be considered as malware as well). In this work, we present a large-scale analytical study of Android adware samples to quantify to what extent “adware should be considered as malware”. Our analysis is based on the Androzoo repository of 5 million apps with associated AV labels and leverages a state-of-the-art label harmonization tool to infer the malicious type of apps before confronting it against the ad families that each adware app is associated with. We found that all adware families include samples that are actually known to implement specific malicious behavior types. Up to 50% of samples in an ad family could be flagged as malicious. Overall the study demonstrates that adware is not necessarily benign. [less ▲]

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See detailDésérialisation Java : Une brève introduction au ROP de haut niveau
Bartel, Alexandre UL; Klein, Jacques UL; Le Traon, Yves UL

Article for general public (2019)

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See detailFraudDroid: Automated Ad Fraud Detection for Android Apps
Dong, Feng; Wang, Haoyu; Li, Li et al

in ACM Joint European Software Engineering Conference and Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (ESEC/FSE 2018) (2018, November)

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See detailMoonlightBox: Mining Android API Histories for Uncovering Release-time Inconsistencies
Li, Li; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Klein, Jacques UL

in 29th IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering (ISSRE) (2018, October)

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See detailAutomated Testing of Android Apps: A Systematic Literature Review
Kong, Pingfan UL; Li, Li; Gao, Jun UL et al

in IEEE Transactions on Reliability (2018)

Automated testing of Android apps is essential for app users, app developers and market maintainer communities alike. Given the widespread adoption of Android and the specificities of its development ... [more ▼]

Automated testing of Android apps is essential for app users, app developers and market maintainer communities alike. Given the widespread adoption of Android and the specificities of its development model, the literature has proposed various testing approaches for ensuring that not only functional requirements but also non-functional requirements are satisfied. In this paper, we aim at providing a clear overview of the state-of-the-art works around the topic of Android app testing, in an attempt to highlight the main trends, pinpoint the main methodologies applied and enumerate the challenges faced by the Android testing approaches as well as the directions where the community effort is still needed. To this end, we conduct a Systematic Literature Review (SLR) during which we eventually identified 103 relevant research papers published in leading conferences and journals until 2016. Our thorough examination of the relevant literature has led to several findings and highlighted the challenges that Android testing researchers should strive to address in the future. After that, we further propose a few concrete research directions where testing approaches are needed to solve recurrent issues in app updates, continuous increases of app sizes, as well as the Android ecosystem fragmentation. [less ▲]

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See detailCiD: Automating the Detection of API-related Compatibility Issues in Android Apps
Li, Li; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Wang, Haoyu et al

in International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis (ISSTA) (2018, July)

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See detailFaCoY - A Code-to-Code Search Engine
Kim, Kisub UL; Kim, Dongsun UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2018) (2018, May 27)

Code search is an unavoidable activity in software development. Various approaches and techniques have been explored in the literature to support code search tasks. Most of these approaches focus on ... [more ▼]

Code search is an unavoidable activity in software development. Various approaches and techniques have been explored in the literature to support code search tasks. Most of these approaches focus on serving user queries provided as natural language free-form input. However, there exists a wide range of use-case scenarios where a code-to-code approach would be most beneficial. For example, research directions in code transplantation, code diversity, patch recommendation can leverage a code-to-code search engine to find essential ingredients for their techniques. In this paper, we propose FaCoY, a novel approach for statically finding code fragments which may be semantically similar to user input code. FaCoY implements a query alternation strategy: instead of directly matching code query tokens with code in the search space, FaCoY first attempts to identify other tokens which may also be relevant in implementing the functional behavior of the input code. With various experiments, we show that (1) FaCoY is more effective than online code-to-code search engines; (2) FaCoY can detect more semantic code clones (i.e., Type-4) in BigCloneBench than the state-of-theart; (3) FaCoY, while static, can detect code fragments which are indeed similar with respect to runtime execution behavior; and (4) FaCoY can be useful in code/patch recommendation. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards Estimating and Predicting User Perception on Software Product Variants
Martinez, Jabier; Sottet, Jean-Sebastien; Garcia-Frey, Alfonso et al

in 17th International Conference on Software Reuse (ICSR) (2018, May)

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See detailCharacterising Deprecated Android APIs
Li, Li; Gao, Jun UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in 15th International Conference on Mining Software Repositories (MSR 2018) (2018, May)

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See detailExtracting Statistical Graph Features for Accurate and Efficient Time Series Classification
Li, Daoyuan UL; Lin, Jessica; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in 21st International Conference on Extending Database Technology (2018, March)

This paper presents a multiscale visibility graph representation for time series as well as feature extraction methods for time series classification (TSC). Unlike traditional TSC approaches that seek to ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a multiscale visibility graph representation for time series as well as feature extraction methods for time series classification (TSC). Unlike traditional TSC approaches that seek to find global similarities in time series databases (eg., Nearest Neighbor with Dynamic Time Warping distance) or methods specializing in locating local patterns/subsequences (eg., shapelets), we extract solely statistical features from graphs that are generated from time series. Specifically, we augment time series by means of their multiscale approximations, which are further transformed into a set of visibility graphs. After extracting probability distributions of small motifs, density, assortativity, etc., these features are used for building highly accurate classification models using generic classifiers (eg., Support Vector Machine and eXtreme Gradient Boosting). Thanks to the way how we transform time series into graphs and extract features from them, we are able to capture both global and local features from time series. Based on extensive experiments on a large number of open datasets and comparison with five state-of-the-art TSC algorithms, our approach is shown to be both accurate and efficient: it is more accurate than Learning Shapelets and at the same time faster than Fast Shapelets. [less ▲]

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See detailAugmenting and Structuring User Queries to Support Efficient Free-Form Code Search
Sirres, Raphael; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Kim, Dongsun et al

in Empirical Software Engineering (2018), 90

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See detailFeature location benchmark for extractive software product line adoption research using realistic and synthetic Eclipse variants
Martinez, Jabier; Ziadi, Tewfik; Papadakis, Mike UL et al

in Information and Software Technology (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 UL)
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See detailDésérialisation Java : Une brève introduction
Bartel, Alexandre UL; Klein, Jacques UL; Le Traon, Yves UL

Article for general public (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (2 UL)
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See detailFini le Bac à Sable. Avec le CVE-2017-3272, devenez un grand!
Bartel, Alexandre UL; Klein, Jacques UL; Le Traon, Yves UL

Article for general public (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (3 UL)
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See detailOn Locating Malicious Code in Piggybacked Android Apps
Li, Li UL; Li, Daoyuan UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL et al

in Journal of Computer Science & Technology (2017)

To devise efficient approaches and tools for detecting malicious packages in the Android ecosystem, researchers are increasingly required to have a deep understanding of malware. There is thus a need to ... [more ▼]

To devise efficient approaches and tools for detecting malicious packages in the Android ecosystem, researchers are increasingly required to have a deep understanding of malware. There is thus a need to provide a framework for dissecting malware and locating malicious program fragments within app code in order to build a comprehensive dataset of malicious samples. Towards addressing this need, we propose in this work a tool-based approach called HookRanker, which provides ranked lists of potentially malicious packages based on the way malware behaviour code is triggered. With experiments on a ground truth of piggybacked apps, we are able to automatically locate the malicious packages from piggybacked Android apps with an accuracy@5 of 83.6% for such packages that are triggered through method invocations and an accuracy@5 of 82.2% for such packages that are triggered independently. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a Plug-and-Play and Holistic Data Mining Framework for Understanding and Facilitating Operations in Smart Buildings
Li, Daoyuan UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Klein, Jacques UL et al

Report (2017)

Nowadays, a significant portion of the total energy consumption is attributed to the buildings sector. In order to save energy and protect the environment, energy consumption in buildings must be more ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, a significant portion of the total energy consumption is attributed to the buildings sector. In order to save energy and protect the environment, energy consumption in buildings must be more efficient. At the same time, buildings should offer the same (if not more) comfort to their occupants. Consequently, modern buildings have been equipped with various sensors and actuators and interconnected control systems to meet occupants’ requirements. Unfortunately, so far, Building Automation Systems data have not been well-exploited due to technical and cost limitations. Yet, it can be exceptionally beneficial to take full advantage of the data flowing inside buildings in order to diagnose issues, explore solutions and improve occupant-building interactions. This paper presents a plug-and-play and holistic data mining framework named PHoliData for smart buildings to collect, store, visualize and mine useful information and domain knowledge from data in smart buildings. PHoliData allows non technical experts to easily explore and understand their buildings with minimum IT support. An architecture of this framework has been introduced and a prototype has been implemented and tested against real-world settings. Discussions with industry experts have suggested the system to be extremely helpful for understanding buildings, since it can provide hints about energy efficiency improvements. Finally, extensive experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of such a framework in practice and its advantage and potential for buildings operators. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Tool Support in Patch Construction
Koyuncu, Anil UL; Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Kim, Dongsun UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, July)

In this work, we investigate the practice of patch construction in the Linux kernel development, focusing on the differences between three patching processes: (1) patches crafted entirely manually to fix ... [more ▼]

In this work, we investigate the practice of patch construction in the Linux kernel development, focusing on the differences between three patching processes: (1) patches crafted entirely manually to fix bugs, (2) those that are derived from warnings of bug detection tools, and (3) those that are automatically generated based on fix patterns. With this study, we provide to the research community concrete insights on the practice of patching as well as how the development community is currently embracing research and commercial patching tools to improve productivity in repair. The result of our study shows that tool-supported patches are increasingly adopted by the developer community while manually-written patches are accepted more quickly. Patch application tools enable developers to remain committed to contributing patches to the code base. Our findings also include that, in actual development processes, patches generally implement several change operations spread over the code, even for patches fixing warnings by bug detection tools. Finally, this study has shown that there is an opportunity to directly leverage the output of bug detection tools to readily generate patches that are appropriate for fixing the problem, and that are consistent with manually-written patches. [less ▲]

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See detailEuphony: Harmonious Unification of Cacophonous Anti-Virus Vendor Labels for Android Malware
Hurier, Médéric UL; Suarez-Tangil, Guillermo; Dash, Santanu Kumar et al

in MSR 2017 (2017, May 21)

Android malware is now pervasive and evolving rapidly. Thousands of malware samples are discovered every day with new models of attacks. The growth of these threats has come hand in hand with the ... [more ▼]

Android malware is now pervasive and evolving rapidly. Thousands of malware samples are discovered every day with new models of attacks. The growth of these threats has come hand in hand with the proliferation of collective repositories sharing the latest specimens. Having access to a large number of samples opens new research directions aiming at efficiently vetting apps. However, automatically inferring a reference ground-truth from those repositories is not straightforward and can inadvertently lead to unforeseen misconceptions. On the one hand, samples are often mis-labeled as different parties use distinct naming schemes for the same sample. On the other hand, samples are frequently mis-classified due to conceptual errors made during labeling processes. In this paper, we analyze the associations between all labels given by different vendors and we propose a system called EUPHONY to systematically unify common samples into family groups. The key novelty of our approach is that no a-priori knowledge on malware families is needed. We evaluate our approach using reference datasets and more than 0.4 million additional samples outside of these datasets. Results show that EUPHONY provides competitive performance against the state-of-the-art. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 200 (18 UL)