References of "Klein, Christine 50002100"
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See detailDoes uncoupling protein 2 expression qualify as marker of disease status in LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease?
Grünewald, Anne UL; Arns, Bjorn; Meier, Britta et al

in Antioxidants & redox signaling (2014), 20(13), 1955-60

Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common known genetic cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the penetrance of the disease is below 50% at 60 years of age ... [more ▼]

Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common known genetic cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the penetrance of the disease is below 50% at 60 years of age. LRRK2 is associated with the mitochondrial membrane, and mutant forms impair the function of the organelle and autophagosome clearance in human cells, including induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons. Elevated expression of uncoupling proteins has been identified as the cause of mitochondrial depolarization in human fibroblasts with G2019S LRRK2. To identify factors that contribute to the penetrance of LRRK2 mutations, we studied respiratory chain function, markers of mitochondrial uncoupling, oxidative stress, and autophagy in fibroblasts from affected and unaffected carriers of the G2019S mutation. Independent of disease status, all mutation carriers showed reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased proton leakage, and more fragmented mitochondria. However, a significant increase in the expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was only detected in affected individuals with the G2019S mutation in LRRK2. Since oxidative stress and autophagic markers were selectively increased in some of the PD patients, we hypothesize that UCP2 expression is upregulated in response to elevated reactive oxygen species generation in affected mutation carriers and that UCP2 mRNA levels might, therefore, serve as markers of disease status in LRRK2-associated PD. [less ▲]

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See detailPINK1 loss-of-function mutations affect mitochondrial complex I activity via NdufA10 ubiquinone uncoupling.
Morais, Vanessa A.; Haddad, Dominik; Craessaerts, Katleen et al

in Science (New York, N.Y.) (2014), 344(6180), 203-7

Under resting conditions, Pink1 knockout cells and cells derived from patients with PINK1 mutations display a loss of mitochondrial complex I reductive activity, causing a decrease in the mitochondrial ... [more ▼]

Under resting conditions, Pink1 knockout cells and cells derived from patients with PINK1 mutations display a loss of mitochondrial complex I reductive activity, causing a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Analyzing the phosphoproteome of complex I in liver and brain from Pink1(-/-) mice, we found specific loss of phosphorylation of serine-250 in complex I subunit NdufA10. Phosphorylation of serine-250 was needed for ubiquinone reduction by complex I. Phosphomimetic NdufA10 reversed Pink1 deficits in mouse knockout cells and rescued mitochondrial depolarization and synaptic transmission defects in pink(B9)-null mutant Drosophila. Complex I deficits and adenosine triphosphate synthesis were also rescued in cells derived from PINK1 patients. Thus, this evolutionary conserved pathway may contribute to the pathogenic cascade that eventually leads to Parkinson's disease in patients with PINK1 mutations. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide association study in musician's dystonia: a risk variant at the arylsulfatase G locus?
Lohmann, Katja; Schmidt, Alexander; Schillert, Arne et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2014), 29(7), 921-7

Musician's dystonia (MD) affects 1% to 2% of professional musicians and frequently terminates performance careers. It is characterized by loss of voluntary motor control when playing the instrument ... [more ▼]

Musician's dystonia (MD) affects 1% to 2% of professional musicians and frequently terminates performance careers. It is characterized by loss of voluntary motor control when playing the instrument. Little is known about genetic risk factors, although MD or writer's dystonia (WD) occurs in relatives of 20% of MD patients. We conducted a 2-stage genome-wide association study in whites. Genotypes at 557,620 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed stringent quality control for 127 patients and 984 controls. Ten SNPs revealed P < 10(-5) and entered the replication phase including 116 MD patients and 125 healthy musicians. A genome-wide significant SNP (P < 5 x 10(-8) ) was also genotyped in 208 German or Dutch WD patients, 1,969 Caucasian, Spanish, and Japanese patients with other forms of focal or segmental dystonia as well as in 2,233 ethnically matched controls. Genome-wide significance with MD was observed for an intronic variant in the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene (rs11655081; P = 3.95 x 10(-9) ; odds ratio [OR], 4.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66-7.05). rs11655081 was also associated with WD (P = 2.78 x 10(-2) ) but not with any other focal or segmental dystonia. The allele frequency of rs11655081 varies substantially between different populations. The population stratification in our sample was modest (lambda = 1.07), but the effect size may be overestimated. Using a small but homogenous patient sample, we provide data for a possible association of ARSG with MD. The variant may also contribute to the risk of WD, a form of dystonia that is often found in relatives of MD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailTargeted next generation sequencing in SPAST-negative hereditary spastic paraplegia.
Kumar, Kishore R.; Blair, Nicholas F.; Vandebona, Himesha et al

in Journal of neurology (2013), 260(10), 2516-22

Molecular characterization is important for an accurate diagnosis in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Mutations in the gene SPAST (SPG4) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant forms. We ... [more ▼]

Molecular characterization is important for an accurate diagnosis in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Mutations in the gene SPAST (SPG4) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant forms. We performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) in a SPAST-negative HSP sample. Forty-four consecutive HSP patients were recruited from an adult neurogenetics clinic in Sydney, Australia. SPAST mutations were confirmed in 17 subjects, and therefore 27 SPAST-negative patients were entered into this study. Patients were screened according to mode of inheritance using a PCR-based library and NGS (Roche Junior 454 sequencing platform). The screening panel included ten autosomal dominant (AD) and nine autosomal recessive (AR) HSP-causing genes. A genetic cause for HSP was identified in 25.9 % (7/27) of patients, including 1/12 classified as AD and 6/15 as AR or sporadic inheritance. Several forms of HSP were identified, including one patient with SPG31, four with SPG7 (with one novel SPG7 mutation) and two with SPG5 (including two novel CYP7B1 frameshift mutations). Additional clinical features were noted, including optic atrophy and ataxia for patients with SPG5 and ataxia and a chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia-like phenotype for SPG7. This protocol enabled the identification of a genetic cause in approximately 25 % of patients in whom one of the most common genetic forms of HSP (SPG4) was excluded. Targeted NGS may be a useful method to screen for mutations in multiple genes associated with HSP. More studies are warranted to determine the optimal approach to achieve a genetic diagnosis in this condition. [less ▲]

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See detailNext-generation phenotyping using the parkin example: time to catch up with genetics.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Kasten, Meike; Ziegler, Andreas et al

in JAMA neurology (2013), 70(9), 1186-91

IMPORTANCE: Two decades of intense research have led to important insights into the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, with limited direct clinical impact. While next-generation sequencing has ... [more ▼]

IMPORTANCE: Two decades of intense research have led to important insights into the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, with limited direct clinical impact. While next-generation sequencing has emerged as a powerful research tool, we hypothesized that systematic exploitation of phenotypic data are lagging behind genetic advances. OBJECTIVES: To use the 15-year experience with parkin-associated Parkinson disease (PD) to evaluate type, quality, and quantity of genetic and phenotypic data and to elucidate clinical or genetic features impacting genetic testing and counseling. EVIDENCE REVIEW: We searched MEDLINE: (1998-2012) using the term parkin AND mutation for English publications about proved parkin-associated PD and at least minimal, individual clinical information excluding digenic cases, and redundant articles. This approach identified 877 articles, of which 196 described patients with PD with confirmed parkin mutations and 127 articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Information was extracted using predefined criteria and a consensus approach for questionable details. To evaluate study method differences, we devised a quality score representing the completeness of clinical, demographic, and genetic information. FINDINGS: In the data about 1184 patients, the quality score increased steadily and was driven exclusively by improvements in genetic analyses. By contrast, demographic and clinical content stagnated. The mean age at onset was 9 years lower in index patients with 2 mutant parkin alleles than in heterozygotes. Genotype-phenotype correlation was observed for the number of mutated alleles and dystonia. By contrast, dementia was rare in all parkin-mutation carriers (<3%), despite long disease duration. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Notwithstanding large gaps in phenotypic information content, we identified dystonia and the absence of dementia as "red flags" to be incorporated in counseling guidelines. We propose mandatory minimal criteria for genotype-phenotype studies to facilitate the next breakthrough-following genetics-toward more personalized medicine for genetic conditions, extending well beyond the parkin example. [less ▲]

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See detailMortalin mutations are not a frequent cause of early-onset Parkinson disease.
Freimann, Karen; Zschiedrich, Katja; Bruggemann, Norbert et al

in Neurobiology of aging (2013), 34(11), 269419-20

Dysfunctional mitochondria and the mitochondrial chaperone mortalin (HSPA9, GRP75) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). We screened 139 early-onset PD (EOPD) patients for ... [more ▼]

Dysfunctional mitochondria and the mitochondrial chaperone mortalin (HSPA9, GRP75) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). We screened 139 early-onset PD (EOPD) patients for mutations in mortalin revealing one missense change (p.L358P) that was absent in 279 control individuals. We also found one additional missense variant among the controls (p.T333K). Although both missense changes were predicted to be disease causing, we detected no differences in subcellular localization, mitochondrial morphology, or respiratory function between wild-type and mutant mortalin. These findings suggest that variants in mortalin (1) are not a major cause of EOPD; (2) occur in patients and controls; and (3) do not lead to functional impairment of mitochondria. [less ▲]

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See detailProminent psychiatric comorbidity in the dominantly inherited movement disorder myoclonus-dystonia.
Weissbach, Anne; Kasten, Meike; Grünewald, Anne UL et al

in Parkinsonism & related disorders (2013), 19(4), 422-5

BACKGROUND: Neurological and psychiatric disorders show clinical overlap suggesting a shared pathophysiological background. We evaluated myoclonus-dystonia, a monogenic movement disorder as a disease ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Neurological and psychiatric disorders show clinical overlap suggesting a shared pathophysiological background. We evaluated myoclonus-dystonia, a monogenic movement disorder as a disease model for inherited psychopathology. METHOD: We investigated 12 SGCE mutation carriers using standardized neurological and psychiatric examinations to assign DSM-IV diagnoses. Furthermore, we analyzed all studies in the Medline database which included psychiatric information on SGCE mutation-positive patients. RESULTS: Of our twelve SGCE mutation carriers, 10 were older than 16 years. Two of them (20%) reported psychiatric diagnoses before our examination, which resulted in at least one psychiatric diagnosis in seven (70%) patients, most frequently anxiety (60%), depression (30%) or both. Substance abuse was observed in 20%, whereas obsessive-compulsive disorders were absent. One mutation carrier showed Axis 2 features. In the literature analysis, the ten studies using standardized tools covering DSM-IV criteria reported prevalences similar to those in our sample. This was three times the frequency of psychiatric disorders detected in 13 studies using clinical history or patient report only. CONCLUSION: About two thirds of SGCE mutation carriers develop psychiatric comorbidity and >80% are previously undiagnosed. [less ▲]

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See detailPhosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)-dependent ubiquitination of endogenous Parkin attenuates mitophagy: study in human primary fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Shurkewitsch, Katharina; Seibler, Philip et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2013), 288(4), 2223-37

Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin and the mitochondrial PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive forms of familial Parkinson disease, with PINK1 ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin and the mitochondrial PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive forms of familial Parkinson disease, with PINK1 functioning upstream of Parkin in a pathway important for the maintenance of mitochondrial function and morphology. Upon the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, Parkin translocates to mitochondria in a PINK1-dependent manner to ubiquitinate mitochondrial proteins. Parkin-mediated polyubiquitination of outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) proteins recruits the ubiquitin- and LC3-binding adaptor protein p62 to mitochondria and induces mitophagy. Although previous studies examined mitophagy in established cell lines through overexpression approaches, there is an imperative to study the role of endogenous Parkin and PINK1 in human-derived and biologically relevant cell models. Here, we demonstrate in human primary fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem-derived neurons from controls and PINK1 mutation carriers that endogenous levels of Parkin are not sufficient to initiate mitophagy upon loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, caused by its (self-)ubiquitination, followed by degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. Next, we showed differential PINK1-dependent, Parkin-mediated ubiquitination of OMM proteins, which is Parkin dose-dependent and affects primarily OMM proteins of higher molecular mass. In contrast to the situation fibroblasts, we did not detect mitophagy in induced pluripotent stem-derived neurons even upon overexpression of Parkin. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mitophagy differs between human non-neuronal and neuronal cells and between "endogenous" and "Parkin-overexpressing" cellular models. [less ▲]

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See detailBee venom and its component apamin as neuroprotective agents in a Parkinson disease mouse model.
Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Noelker, Carmen; Vulinovic, Franca et al

in PloS one (2013), 8(4), 61700

Bee venom has recently been suggested to possess beneficial effects in the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD). For instance, it has been observed that bilateral acupoint stimulation of lower hind limbs ... [more ▼]

Bee venom has recently been suggested to possess beneficial effects in the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD). For instance, it has been observed that bilateral acupoint stimulation of lower hind limbs with bee venom was protective in the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. In particular, a specific component of bee venom, apamin, has previously been shown to have protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in vitro. However, no information regarding a potential protective action of apamin in animal models of PD is available to date. The specific goals of the present study were to (i) establish that the protective effect of bee venom for dopaminergic neurons is not restricted to acupoint stimulation, but can also be observed using a more conventional mode of administration and to (ii) demonstrate that apamin can mimic the protective effects of a bee venom treatment on dopaminergic neurons. Using the chronic mouse model of MPTP/probenecid, we show that bee venom provides sustained protection in an animal model that mimics the chronic degenerative process of PD. Apamin, however, reproduced these protective effects only partially, suggesting that other components of bee venom enhance the protective action of the peptide. [less ▲]

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See detailNext-generation phenotyping and genomic incidental findings--reply.
Kasten, Meike; Grünewald, Anne UL; Klein, Christine UL

in JAMA neurology (2013), 70(12), 1590-1

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See detailGlucocerebrosidase mutations in a Serbian Parkinson's disease population.
Kumar, K. R.; Ramirez, A.; Gobel, A. et al

in European journal of neurology (2013), 20(2), 402-5

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To screen for glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations in a Serbian Parkinson's disease (PD) population. METHODS: Glucocerebrosidase exons 8-11 harbouring the most common mutations were ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To screen for glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations in a Serbian Parkinson's disease (PD) population. METHODS: Glucocerebrosidase exons 8-11 harbouring the most common mutations were sequenced in 360 patients with PD and 348 controls from Serbia. Haplotype analysis was performed for the N370S mutation and compared with German and Ashkenazi Jewish carriers. RESULTS: Glucocerebrosidase mutations were significantly more frequent in patients with PD (21/360; 5.8%) vs. controls (5/348; 1.4%; OR = 4.25; CI, 1.58-11.40; P = 0.0041). Two patients with PD carried homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in GBA. The N370S mutation accounted for about half of the mutated alleles in patients (10/23) but was absent amongst controls. Three novel variants were detected including two non-synonymous variants (D380V, N392S) in the patient group and one synonymous change (V459V) in a control. Carriers of the D409H mutation were also sequenced for H255Q, and all were found to carry the [D409H; H255Q] double-mutant allele. Genotyping suggested a common haplotype for all N370S carriers. CONCLUSION: Glucocerebrosidase mutations represent a PD risk factor in the Serbian population. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo faces of the same coin: benign familial infantile seizures and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia caused by PRRT2 mutations.
Schmidt, Alexander; Kumar, Kishore R.; Redyk, Katharina et al

in Archives of neurology (2012), 69(5), 668-70

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See detailATP13A2 mutations impair mitochondrial function in fibroblasts from patients with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Arns, Bjorn; Seibler, Philip et al

in Neurobiology of aging (2012), 33(8), 18431-7

Mutations in ATP13A2 cause autosomal-recessive parkinsonism (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome; KRS). Because several other parkinsonism-associated proteins have been connected to mitochondrial function and mitophagy ... [more ▼]

Mutations in ATP13A2 cause autosomal-recessive parkinsonism (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome; KRS). Because several other parkinsonism-associated proteins have been connected to mitochondrial function and mitophagy, we studied the impact of endogenous mutations in ATPase type 13A2 (ATP13A2) on mitochondria in fibroblasts from KRS patients compared with controls. In patients, we detected decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rates, increased mitochondrial DNA levels, a higher frequency of mitochondrial DNA lesions, increased oxygen consumption rates, and increased fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. Importantly, overexpression of wild-type ATP13A2 rescued the respiration phenotype. These findings collectively suggest that ATP13A2 contributes to the maintenance of a healthy mitochondrial pool, supporting the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial clearance represents an important pathogenic mechanism underlying KRS. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in the phospholipid remodeling gene SERAC1 impair mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking and cause dystonia and deafness.
Wortmann, Saskia B.; Vaz, Frederic M.; Gardeitchik, Thatjana et al

in Nature genetics (2012), 44(7), 797-802

Using exome sequencing, we identify SERAC1 mutations as the cause of MEGDEL syndrome, a recessive disorder of dystonia and deafness with Leigh-like syndrome, impaired oxidative phosphorylation and 3 ... [more ▼]

Using exome sequencing, we identify SERAC1 mutations as the cause of MEGDEL syndrome, a recessive disorder of dystonia and deafness with Leigh-like syndrome, impaired oxidative phosphorylation and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. We localized SERAC1 at the interface between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum in the mitochondria-associated membrane fraction that is essential for phospholipid exchange. A phospholipid analysis in patient fibroblasts showed elevated concentrations of phosphatidylglycerol-34:1 (where the species nomenclature denotes the number of carbon atoms in the two acyl chains:number of double bonds in the two acyl groups) and decreased concentrations of phosphatidylglycerol-36:1 species, resulting in an altered cardiolipin subspecies composition. We also detected low concentrations of bis(monoacyl-glycerol)-phosphate, leading to the accumulation of free cholesterol, as shown by abnormal filipin staining. Complementation of patient fibroblasts with wild-type human SERAC1 by lentiviral infection led to a decrease and partial normalization of the mean ratio of phosphatidylglycerol-34:1 to phosphatidylglycerol-36:1. Our data identify SERAC1 as a key player in the phosphatidylglycerol remodeling that is essential for both mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking. [less ▲]

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See detailAn unusual neurological syndrome of crawling gait, dystonia, pyramidal signs, and limited speech.
Arif, Beenish; Grünewald, Anne UL; Fatima, Amara et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2011), 26(12), 2279-83

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to identify and molecularly characterize a neurological syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: Five patients, their 2 siblings, and their parents ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to identify and molecularly characterize a neurological syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: Five patients, their 2 siblings, and their parents were clinically examined. DNA from all 7 siblings was genotyped with Affymetrix SNP arrays and sequencing of selected candidate genes. RESULTS: An unusual neurological syndrome of crawling gait, predominant leg dystonia, pyramidal signs, microcephaly, and suspected deafness segregated in the family. Three patients ambulated on hands and knees, either by hopping and crossing their legs, or by dragging the legs behind them. Two patients have acquired the ability to walk bipedally with a dystonic gait. Unexpectedly, no chromosomal region was homozygous in patients only. Under different disease models, we localized 7 chromosomal regions in the genome common to all patients. No pathogenic mutations were identified in selected candidate genes or the mitochondrial genome. CONCLUSION: We describe an unusual movement disorder syndrome reminiscent of but distinct from Uner Tan syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in PINK1 and Parkin impair ubiquitination of Mitofusins in human fibroblasts.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Grünewald, Anne UL; Kottwitz, Jan et al

in PloS one (2011), 6(3), 16746

PINK1 and Parkin mutations cause recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). In Drosophila and SH-SY5Y cells, Parkin is recruited by PINK1 to damaged mitochondria, where it ubiquitinates Mitofusins and ... [more ▼]

PINK1 and Parkin mutations cause recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). In Drosophila and SH-SY5Y cells, Parkin is recruited by PINK1 to damaged mitochondria, where it ubiquitinates Mitofusins and consequently promotes mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.Here, we investigated the impact of mutations in endogenous PINK1 and Parkin on the ubiquitination of mitochondrial fusion and fission factors and the mitochondrial network structure. Treating control fibroblasts with mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi) inhibitors or H(2)O(2) resulted in ubiquitination of Mfn1/2 but not of OPA1 or Fis1. Ubiquitination of Mitofusins through the PINK1/Parkin pathway was observed within 1 h of treatment. Upon combined inhibition of Deltapsi and the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), no ubiquitination of Mitofusins was detected. Regarding morphological changes, we observed a trend towards increased mitochondrial branching in PD patient cells upon mitochondrial stress.For the first time in PD patient-derived cells, we demonstrate that mutations in PINK1 and Parkin impair ubiquitination of Mitofusins. In the presence of UPS inhibitors, ubiquitinated Mitofusin is deubiquitinated by the UPS but not degraded, suggesting that the UPS is involved in Mitofusin degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailBioenergetic consequences of PINK1 mutations in Parkinson disease.
Abramov, Andrey Yurevich; Gegg, Matthew; Grünewald, Anne UL et al

in PloS one (2011), 6(10), 25622

BACKGROUND: Mutations of the gene for PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are a cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). PINK1 protein has been localised to mitochondria and PINK1 gene knockout models ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mutations of the gene for PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are a cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD). PINK1 protein has been localised to mitochondria and PINK1 gene knockout models exhibit abnormal mitochondrial function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cells derived from PD patients with a range of PINK1 mutations demonstrate similar defects of mitochondrial function, whether the nature and severity of the abnormalities vary between mutations and correlate with clinical features. METHODOLOGY: We investigated mitochondrial bioenergetics in live fibroblasts from PINK1 mutation patients using single cell techniques. We found that fibroblasts from PINK1 mutation patients had significant defects of bioenergetics including reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, altered redox state, a respiratory deficiency that was determined by substrate availability, and enhanced sensitivity to calcium stimulation and associated mitochondrial permeability pore opening. There was an increase in the basal rate of free radical production in the mutant cells. The pattern and severity of abnormality varied between different mutations, and the less severe defects in these cells were associated with later age of onset of PD. CONCLUSIONS: The results provide insight into the molecular pathology of PINK1 mutations in PD and also confirm the critical role of substrate availability in determining the biochemical phenotype--thereby offering the potential for novel therapeutic strategies to circumvent these abnormalities. [less ▲]

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See detailMutant Parkin impairs mitochondrial function and morphology in human fibroblasts.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Voges, Lisa; Rakovic, Aleksandar et al

in PloS one (2010), 5(9), 12962

BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved in respiratory chain function and mitochondrial dynamics. More recent publications also described a link between Parkin and mitophagy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the impact of Parkin mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology in a human cellular model. Fibroblasts were obtained from three members of an Italian PD family with two mutations in Parkin (homozygous c.1072delT, homozygous delEx7, compound-heterozygous c.1072delT/delEx7), as well as from two relatives without mutations. Furthermore, three unrelated compound-heterozygous patients (delEx3-4/duplEx7-12, delEx4/c.924C>T and delEx1/c.924C>T) and three unrelated age-matched controls were included. Fibroblasts were cultured under basal or paraquat-induced oxidative stress conditions. ATP synthesis rates and cellular levels were detected luminometrically. Activities of complexes I-IV and citrate synthase were measured spectrophotometrically in mitochondrial preparations or cell lysates. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide. Oxidative stress levels were investigated with the OxyBlot technique. The mitochondrial network was investigated immunocytochemically and the degree of branching was determined with image processing methods. We observed a decrease in the production and overall concentration of ATP coinciding with increased mitochondrial mass in Parkin-mutant fibroblasts. After an oxidative insult, the membrane potential decreased in patient cells but not in controls. We further determined higher levels of oxidized proteins in the mutants both under basal and stress conditions. The degree of mitochondrial network branching was comparable in mutants and controls under basal conditions and decreased to a similar extent under paraquat-induced stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Parkin mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial function and morphology in non-neuronal human cells. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of endogenous mutant and wild-type PINK1 on Parkin in fibroblasts from Parkinson disease patients.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Grünewald, Anne UL; Seibler, Philip et al

in Human molecular genetics (2010), 19(16), 3124-37

Mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine-threonine kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal-recessive forms of Parkinson disease (PD ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine-threonine kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal-recessive forms of Parkinson disease (PD). Both are involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and protection from multiple stressors. Recently, Parkin was demonstrated to be recruited to impaired mitochondria in a PINK1-dependent manner, where it triggers mitophagy. Using primary human dermal fibroblasts originating from PD patients with various PINK1 mutations, we showed at the endogenous level that (i) PINK1 regulates the stress-induced decrease of endogenous Parkin; (ii) mitochondrially localized PINK1 mediates the stress-induced mitochondrial translocation of Parkin; (iii) endogenous PINK1 is stabilized on depolarized mitochondria; and (iv) mitochondrial accumulation of full-length PINK1 is sufficient but not necessary for the stress-induced loss of Parkin signal and its mitochondrial translocation. Furthermore, we showed that different stressors, depolarizing or non-depolarizing, led to the same effect on detectable Parkin levels and its mitochondrial targeting. Although this effect on Parkin was independent of the mitochondrial membrane potential, we demonstrate a differential effect of depolarizing versus non-depolarizing stressors on endogenous levels of PINK1. Our study shows the necessity to introduce an environmental factor, i.e. stress, to visualize the differences in the interaction of PINK1 and Parkin in mutants versus controls. Establishing human fibroblasts as a suitable model for studying this interaction, we extend data from animal and other cellular models and provide experimental evidence for the generally held notion of PD as a condition with a combined genetic and environmental etiology. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential effects of PINK1 nonsense and missense mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Gegg, M. E.; Taanman, J.-W. et al

in Experimental neurology (2009), 219(1), 266-73

Mutations of the PINK1 gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). PINK1 encodes a mitochondrial kinase of unknown function which is widely expressed in both neuronal and non ... [more ▼]

Mutations of the PINK1 gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). PINK1 encodes a mitochondrial kinase of unknown function which is widely expressed in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. We have studied fibroblast cultures from four family members harbouring the homozygous p.Q456X mutation in PINK1, three of their wild-type relatives, one individual with the homozygous p.V170G mutation and five independent controls. Results showed bioenergetic abnormalities involving decreased activities of complexes I and IV along with increased activities of complexes II and III in the missense p.V170G mutant. There were increased basal levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase in these cells and an exaggerated increase of reduced glutathione in response to paraquat-induced free radical formation. Furthermore, swollen and enlarged mitochondria were observed in this sample. In the p.Q456X nonsense mutants, the respiratory chain enzymes were unaffected, but ATP levels were significantly decreased. These results confirm that mutations of PINK1 cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology, bioenergetic function and oxidative metabolism in human tissues but suggest that the biochemical consequences may vary between mutations. [less ▲]

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