References of "Kirsch, Claudine 50002094"
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See detailNew Migration of Families from Greece to Europe and Canada – Experiences and Interpretations of Family Members within the Context of Different Migration Societies and Educational Systems
Panagiotopoulou, Argyro; Rosen, Lisa; Kirsch, Claudine UL et al

Book published by Springer - Reihe Inklusion Bildung Migration (in press)

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See detailPromoting multilingualism and multiliteracies through storytelling: a case-study on the use of the app iTEO in preschools in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Breuer, Esther; Lindgren, E; Stavans, A (Eds.) et al Multilingual Literacy (in press)

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See detailSprachliche Voraussetzungen
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Kiel, Ewald; Herzig, Bardo; Maier, Uwe (Eds.) et al Handbuch Unterrichten in allgemeinbildenden Schulen (in press)

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See detailPreschool teachers’ language-supporting strategies in multilingual education in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May 16)

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See detailThe Influence of Professional Development on Early Years Teachers’ and Educators’ Attitudes and Practices in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 09)

The present case-study based in multilingual Luxembourg reports on the influence of professional development on two preschool teachers’ attitudes towards multilingual education and their emerging ... [more ▼]

The present case-study based in multilingual Luxembourg reports on the influence of professional development on two preschool teachers’ attitudes towards multilingual education and their emerging multilingual practices. The need for multilingual pedagogies has been recognized and several countries in Europe have implemented multilingual programs in early childhood (García, Lin, & May, 2017; Panagiotopoulou, 2016). Nevertheless, practices often remain monolingual and focus on the development of the majority language (Kratzmann et al., 2017). In Luxembourg, new laws were voted in 2017 that require preschool teachers to develop the three-to-five -year-olds’ skills in Luxembourgish, familiarize them with French, and value home languages. Before 2017, the language policy focused on Luxembourgish. Nevertheless, some teachers had implemented multilingual practices to address the diverse language needs of the children (Kirsch, 2017). In 2015/16, 63,5 % of the four-year-olds did not speak Luxembourgish as a home language (MENJE, 2017). To develop inclusive multilingual practices, researchers at the University of Luxembourg developed a professional development program (thereafter PD) based on the pedagogy of translanguaging (García et al., 2017). The latter is supportive of social justice, places the learners at the centre and gives them some agency over their language use. The 30-hour program was collaborative and inquiry-based and included coaching. The practitioners were invited to implement activities based on books and rhymes in several languages and video-record these activities. The professionals reflected on their practices in the meetings. The research project drew on both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The data collection drew on a questionnaire completed before, during and after the PD; six interviews; six observations of the course and 15 video-recorded classroom activities; four coaching reports and emails after the coaching. The methods of data analysis include paired samples t-test, correlational analysis and content analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006). The findings show a positive effect of PD on the teachers’ knowledge about language learning and their attitudes towards multilingual education. At the beginning of the course, both teachers were influenced by the monolingual language policy in place, parental expectation, and the belief that children learn less Luxembourgish if they encountered other languages. The initial sceptics changed once the teachers began to implement activities in French and home languages, and realized the children’s motivation,engagement and continued progress in Luxembourgish. Both incorporated rituals and regular activities that drew on multiple languages. Both repeatedly acknowledged the impact of the PD, stating that the instruction, the reflection on their activities and the feedback helped them develop different perspectives on their own teaching. The findings of this study confirm that long-term, collaborative and inquiry-based professional development can be transformative (Gaikhorst et al., 2017; Kennedy, 2005; Prenger et al., 2017). They also contribute to the dearth of literature on PD on multilingual education in early years (Egert, 2015). [less ▲]

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See detailDialog - traduction française du magazine DIALOG
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone UL

Article for general public (2018)

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See detailAuf dem Weg zur mehrsprachigen Bildung in der frühen Kindheit
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Universität Luxembourg (Ed.) Bildungsbericht.Bildungsverläufe und Bildungserfolge (2018)

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See detail• The influence of a professional development on teachers’ and carers’ multilingual practices in early childhood education in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, November 08)

The need for multilingual pedagogies has been recognized and several multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood in Europe. In Luxembourg, where this study is based, laws were voted ... [more ▼]

The need for multilingual pedagogies has been recognized and several multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood in Europe. In Luxembourg, where this study is based, laws were voted in 2017 that require early years practitioners to develop Luxembourgish, familiarize children with French, and value home languages. To develop inclusive multilingual practices, the authors of this presentation developed a 30-hour professional development programme (thereafter PD) which was long-term, collaborative, inquiry-based, performance-oriented, and included coaching. The participants carried out and video-record activities based on books and rhymes in several languages, reflected on these, and received feedback. This case-study examines the influence of the PD on the understanding of language learning and practices of two teachers and five carers working in schools and crèches. The data stem from a questionnaire completed three times; twelve interviews; six observations of the training; 30 video-recorded activities; ten coaching reports, and emails. The methods of data analysis comprise paired samples t-test, correlational analysis, content analysis and triangulation. The findings show a positive effect of the PD on understanding of language learning and practices. The teachers and some carers developed a better understanding of social constructivist learning theories which influenced their practices that began to focus on interactions between adults and children, and amongst children. The other carers understood the relevance of dialogue and carried out activities in several languages but their overall practice did not change. The findings confirm that collaborative, inquiry-based PD can be transformative (Gaikhorst et al., 2017; Prenger et al., 2017) and change perspectives and practices to some extent (Buschmann & Sachse, 2018). In addition, they add to the dearth of literature on PD on multilingual education in early years (Egert, 2015). Buschmann, A., & Sachse, S. (2018). Heidelberg interaction training for language promotion in early childhood settings. European Journal of Education, 53(1), 66-78. Egert, F. (2015). Meta-analysis on the impact of in-service professional development programs for preschool teachers on quality ratings and child outcomes. Gaikhorst, L., Beishuizen, J. J. J., Zijlstra, B. J. H., & Volman, M. L. L. (2017) The sustainability of a teacher professional development programme for beginning urban teachers, Cambridge Journal of Education, 47(1), 135-154. Prenger, R., Poortman, C. L., & Handelzalts, A. (2017). Factors influencing teachers’ professional development in networked professional learning communities. Teaching and Teacher Education, 68(1), 77-90. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of Professional Development on Multilingual Education in Early Childhood in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

in Review of European Studies (2018), 10(4), 148-163

While multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood education in several countries, professionals have shown to be unsure of how to deal with language diversity and promote home ... [more ▼]

While multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood education in several countries, professionals have shown to be unsure of how to deal with language diversity and promote home languages. Therefore, there is a need for professional development. The present article discusses the outcomes of a professional course on multilingual education in early childhood delivered to 46 early-years practitioners in Luxembourg. Using a questionnaire administered prior to and after the course as well as interviews, we examined the influence of the training on attitudes to multilingual education and activities to develop Luxembourgish and home languages. The analysis drew on content analysis, paired samples t-test and correlational analysis. The findings show that the course positively influenced the professionals’ knowledge about multilingualism and language learning, their attitudes towards home languages, their interest in organising activities in the children’s home languages and the implementation of these activities. The results shed light on special interest areas such as the quality of input that future professional development courses could focus on. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic interplay of language policy, beliefs and pedagogy in a nursery class in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Language and Education (2018), 32(5), 444-461

This presentation focuses on the relationship between the language policy, language ideologies and language practices in a nursery class in trilingual Luxembourg. Individual multilingualism is an ... [more ▼]

This presentation focuses on the relationship between the language policy, language ideologies and language practices in a nursery class in trilingual Luxembourg. Individual multilingualism is an educational goal in Luxembourg, a small country in central Europe, and, thus, children learn Luxembourgish from the compulsory nursery school, become literate in German in Year 1 and learn oral and written French from Year 2 and Year 3, respectively. Currently, 62.4% of the children do not speak Luxembourgish on school entry (MENJE 2016). Many speak Portuguese, French or a language of the Balkans. As a result, educational policies focus on the teaching of Luxembourgish from preschool, sometimes at the expense of other languages. Gretsch and Kirsch (2015) developed the app iTEO in order to promote innovative teaching methods that capitalize on the children’s diverse language resources and that promote a dynamic view of bilingualism. This ipad app, which allows for the recording and editing of oral speech, was designed with social-constructivist theories and Bakhtin’s theory of dialogism in mind. This case-study presents the ways in which a preschool teacher’s ideological beliefs influence a child’s language use over a period of two years leading to the child’s understanding of the legitimacy of translanguaging. The focus lies on the interplay between the educational policy focusing on the teaching of Luxembourgish, the teacher’s language ideologies rooted in her multilingual identity and in societal multilingualism, and the child’s experiences of separating languages at home (Kirsch, 2014). The data stem from a qualitative, longitudinal study using a multi-method approach. The study shows that dialogue between teachers, parents, children, policy-makers and researchers can contribute to shifting ideologies and to opening up dynamic languaging spaces. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping speaking and pronunciation skills through storytelling on the app iTEO
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Hood, Philip (Ed.) Teaching Languages Creatively (2018)

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See detailDas Forschungsprojekt MuLiPEC (Developing multilingual pedagogies in early childhood)
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone UL

in University of Luxembourg (Ed.) Bildungsbericht.Bildungsverläufe und Bildungserfolge (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (19 UL)
See detailDas Forschungsprojekt MuLiPEC (Developing multilingual pedagogies in early childhood)
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone UL

in University of Luxembourg (Ed.) Bildungsbericht.Bildungsverläufe und Bildungserfolge (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (19 UL)
See detailDas Forschungsprojekt MuLiPEC (Developing multilingual pedagogies in early childhood)
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone UL

in University of Luxembourg (Ed.) Bildungsbericht.Bildungsverläufe und Bildungserfolge (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (19 UL)
See detailDas Forschungsprojekt MuLiPEC (Developing multilingual pedagogies in early childhood)
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Mortini, Simone UL

in University of Luxembourg (Ed.) Bildungsbericht.Bildungsverläufe und Bildungserfolge (2018)

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See detail(In)flexible Language Use in a Year 4 Class in Luxembourg: Which Languages in Which Subjects?
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Degano, Sarah UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

The project described in this paper is part of the broader research project ‘Capitalizing on Linguistic Diversity in Education’ that investigates how multilingualism can be used as a resource for ... [more ▼]

The project described in this paper is part of the broader research project ‘Capitalizing on Linguistic Diversity in Education’ that investigates how multilingualism can be used as a resource for educational success and social well-being in Luxembourg. Research projects in preschool, Year 1 and Year 2 classes show that teachers have begun to draw on children’s semiotic repertoires (Kirsch 2017, Kirsch and Bes 2017). The present doctoral research project aims to understand the ways in which and the extent to which, first, Year 4 and Year 5 teachers in three schools address linguistic diversity and, second, children draw on their language repertoire to learn. The focus lies on the translanguaging practices of teachers and children. Translanguaging is a pillar of multilingual pedagogies which promote social equity and build on socio-constructivist learning theories (García & Li Wei 2014). The education system in Luxembourg is trilingual in Luxembourgish, German and French. The curriculum is based on monoglossic ideologies and a compartmentalised view of language teaching (De Korne 2012). The system is particularly challenging for the 63.5 percent of primary school children who do not speak Luxembourgish as a first language and underachieve compared to the Luxembourgish-speakers (Menje 2017). This paper draws its data from six days of observations and video-recordings of learning activities in seven French, eight Mathematics and two Arts lessons from September 2017 to January 2018 in one school characterised by the diversity of its intake and the high SES of the families. The data collection is still on-going. The participants are the two teachers of the Year 4 class and three focus children of Slovenian, French and Icelandic background. The thematic analysis focuses on the type of learning activities, the school subjects, the speech acts, the language use, and the pedagogical use of translanguaging. The preliminary findings show that almost all learning activities are teacher-led and that interactions are based on initiation-response-feedback sequences. The teachers systematically translanguage between a target language and the other curricula languages to scaffold learning, build relationships and manage the classroom. Both teachers and children create a specific space for German which is highly unusual in Luxembourg. The children rarely draw on their home languages unless these are the three languages of the country. While translanguaging is frequently used as a scaffold, it is neither transformative nor does it contribute to raising equal opportunities (García & Kleyn 2016). [less ▲]

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