References of "Kieper, Nicole"
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See detailMitochondrial Defects and Neurodegeneration in Mice Overexpressing Wild Type or G399S Mutant HtrA2
Casadei, Nicolas; Sood, Poonan; Ulrich, Thomas et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2016), 25(3), 459-71

The protease HtrA2 has a protective role inside mitochondria, but promotes apoptosis under stress. We previously identified the G399S HtrA2 mutation in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and reported ... [more ▼]

The protease HtrA2 has a protective role inside mitochondria, but promotes apoptosis under stress. We previously identified the G399S HtrA2 mutation in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and reported mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of PD and related to neurodegeneration. Complete loss of HtrA2 has been shown to cause neurodegeneration in mice. However, the full impact of HtrA2 overexpression or the G399S mutation is still to be determined in vivo. Here, we report the first HtrA2 G399S transgenic mouse model. Our data suggest that the mutation has a dominant-negative effect. We also describe a toxic effect of wild-type (WT) HtrA2 overexpression. Only low overexpression of the G399S mutation allowed viable animals and we suggest that the mutant protein is likely unstable. This is accompanied by reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and sensitivity to apoptotic cell death. Mice overexpressing WT HtrA2 were viable, yet these animals have inhibited mitochondrial respiration and significant induction of apoptosis in the brain leading to motor dysfunction, highlighting the opposing roles of HtrA2. Our data further underscore the importance of HtrA2 as a key mediator of mitochondrial function and its fine regulatory role in cell fate. The location and abundance of HtrA2 is tightly controlled and, therefore, human mutations leading to gain- or loss of function could provide significant risk for PD-related neurodegeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced basal autophagy and impaired mitochondrial dynamics due to loss of Parkinson's disease-associated protein DJ-1.
Krebiehl, Guido; Ruckerbauer, Sabine; Burbulla, Lena F. et al

in PloS one (2010), 5(2), 9367

BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and degradation takes a central role in current paradigms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Loss of DJ-1 function is a rare cause of familial PD ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and degradation takes a central role in current paradigms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Loss of DJ-1 function is a rare cause of familial PD. Although a critical role of DJ-1 in oxidative stress response and mitochondrial function has been recognized, the effects on mitochondrial dynamics and downstream consequences remain to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using DJ-1 loss of function cellular models from knockout (KO) mice and human carriers of the E64D mutation in the DJ-1 gene we define a novel role of DJ-1 in the integrity of both cellular organelles, mitochondria and lysosomes. We show that loss of DJ-1 caused impaired mitochondrial respiration, increased intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and characteristic alterations of mitochondrial shape as shown by quantitative morphology. Importantly, ultrastructural imaging and subsequent detailed lysosomal activity analyses revealed reduced basal autophagic degradation and the accumulation of defective mitochondria in DJ-1 KO cells, that was linked with decreased levels of phospho-activated ERK2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that loss of DJ-1 leads to impaired autophagy and accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that under physiological conditions would be compensated via lysosomal clearance. Our study provides evidence for a critical role of DJ-1 in mitochondrial homeostasis by connecting basal autophagy and mitochondrial integrity in Parkinson's disease. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1.
Kieper, Nicole; Holmstrom, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila et al

in Experimental cell research (2010), 316(7), 1213-24

Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro ... [more ▼]

Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailReview: Familial Parkinson's disease--genetics, clinical phenotype and neuropathology in relation to the common sporadic form of the disease.
Schiesling, Carola; Kieper, Nicole; Seidel, Kay et al

in Neuropathology and applied neurobiology (2008), 34(3), 255-71

The identification of the first gene in familial Parkinson's disease (PD) only 10 years ago was a major step in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms in neurodegeneration. Alpha-synuclein ... [more ▼]

The identification of the first gene in familial Parkinson's disease (PD) only 10 years ago was a major step in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms in neurodegeneration. Alpha-synuclein aggregation was not only recognized as a key event in neurodegeneration in patients carrying mutations in this gene, but it turned out to be the most consistent marker to define Lewy body pathology also in non-heritable idiopathic PD (IPD). Subsequent comprehensive pathoanatomical studies of IPD brains led to a novel concept of an ascending pathological process in variable stages that are reflected by alpha-synuclein aggregation at specific predilection sites. To date, more than seven genes are known to cause familial PD. The fact that these genetic forms of Parkinsonism present with clinical features indistinguishable from IPD, but may display neuropathological features that are not consistent with IPD, underscores the need of a more differentiated approach to familial and sporadic forms of Parkinsonism. Indeed, in distinct populations, mutations in one single gene were found to cause the disease in up to 40% of patients formerly described as 'idiopathic' cases. These findings indicate that IPD, as defined by a late-onset disorder with no (apparent) genetic contribution, is part of a clinical syndrome that becomes more and more heterogeneous in terms of aetiology, with overlapping clinical and pathoanatomical features. Thus in the present review, we discuss clues from familial PD to our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegeneration with special consideration of the variable clinical and neuropathological aspects. [less ▲]

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