References of "Khan, Nida 50026438"
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See detailFeasibility Analysis of Blockchain for Donation-based Crowdfunding of Ethical Projects
Khan, Nida UL; Ouaich, Rachid

in AUEIRC Proceeedings (in press)

Donation is a necessary social tool that is plagued by many inherent shortcomings. A novel model in the form of a decentralized app was designed in the Ethereum blockchain to solve the challenges present ... [more ▼]

Donation is a necessary social tool that is plagued by many inherent shortcomings. A novel model in the form of a decentralized app was designed in the Ethereum blockchain to solve the challenges present and optimize the process of Zakaah donation. Load and stress tests on the prototype of the smart contract in the public testnet of Ethereum were analyzed to gauge the feasibility of mass usage. Similar tests were done in Hyperledger to conclude on the optimum blockchain platform for Zakaah. An anomaly was detected during the testing phase of the decentralized app in the public testnet of Ethereum and it was exploited to propose a novel strategy to enhance the throughput of Ethereum. The testing is a pioneer in evaluating the throughput and feasibility of a blockchain based financial product and provides a benchmark to validate the business and technical hypotheses of other similar financial products and services. [less ▲]

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See detailBlockchain Technology - Arsenal for a Shariah-Compliant Financial Ecosystem
Lacasse, Rcihard-Marc; Lambert, Berthe; Khan, Nida UL

Scientific Conference (2017, December 05)

The authors’ first challenge is to decipher the complexity of Islamic Finance despite the opacity of the sector. A second focal point is the agent’s agenda; in the Islamic Finance industry, contributors ... [more ▼]

The authors’ first challenge is to decipher the complexity of Islamic Finance despite the opacity of the sector. A second focal point is the agent’s agenda; in the Islamic Finance industry, contributors mandate intermediaries (agents) to transfer their contributions to social causes according to the Shariah; in principle, Islamic financial institutions must create value for their stakeholders by offering Shariah-compliant products and services. An underlying assumption of agency theory is that agents attempt to maximize their personal welfare and compensation, but such behaviour may not always be in the best interests of other stakeholders, and an analysis of the agent’s agenda can help explain how agents can fall off the pedestal of altruism. Relationships between Islamic banks and three key stakeholders (contributors, beneficiaries and regulators) are also explored via a complexity-aware monitoring process. Contributors provide funds to an Islamic bank (agent), and in return, the agent should be accountable to the contributors, but the form and degree of accountability can vary depending on the organization’s mission. There are many unanswered questions regarding the monitoring process. One objective of the article is to consider whether agents act in the best interests of the stakeholders. Finally, the authors explore the following question: Can blockchain technology and smart contracts support and enhance the transparency feature, which is the core underlying principle of all transactions in the Islamic Finance industry? A qualitative research framework was adopted because of the constraints of the enigmatic, secretive Islamic Finance culture. [less ▲]

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