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See detailVertical and horizontal surface displacements near Jakobshavn Isbræ driven by melt-induced and dynamic ice loss
Nielsen, Karina; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Spada, Giorgio et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth (2013), 118(4), 1837--1844

We analyze Global Positioning System (GPS) time series of relative vertical and horizontal surface displacements from 2006 to 2012 at four GPS sites located between ∼5 and ∼150 km from the front of ... [more ▼]

We analyze Global Positioning System (GPS) time series of relative vertical and horizontal surface displacements from 2006 to 2012 at four GPS sites located between ∼5 and ∼150 km from the front of Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI) in west Greenland. Horizontal displacements during 2006–2010 at KAGA, ILUL, and QEQE, relative to the site AASI, are directed toward north-west, suggesting that the main mass loss signal is located near the frontal portion of JI. The directions of the observed displacements are supported by modeled displacements, derived from NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) surveys of surface elevations from 2006, 2009, and 2010. However, horizontal displacements during 2010–2012 at KAGA and ILUL are directed more towards the west suggesting a change in the spatial distribution of the ice mass loss. In addition, we observe an increase in the uplift rate during 2010–2012 as compared to 2006–2010. The sudden change in vertical and horizontal displacements is due to enhanced melt-induced ice loss in 2010 and 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailBedrock displacements in Greenland manifest ice mass variations, climate cycles and climate change
Bevis, Michael; Wahr, John; Khan, Shfaqat A. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2012), 109(30), 11944-11948

The Greenland GPS Network (GNET) uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to measure the displacement of bedrock exposed near the margins of the Greenland ice sheet. The entire network is uplifting in ... [more ▼]

The Greenland GPS Network (GNET) uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to measure the displacement of bedrock exposed near the margins of the Greenland ice sheet. The entire network is uplifting in response to past and present-day changes in ice mass. Crustal displacement is largely accounted for by an annual oscillation superimposed on a sustained trend. The oscillation is driven by earth’s elastic response to seasonal variations in ice mass and air mass (i.e., atmospheric pressure). Observed vertical velocities are higher and often much higher than predicted rates of postglacial rebound (PGR), implying that uplift is usually dominated by the solid earth’s instantaneous elastic response to contemporary losses in ice mass rather than PGR. Superimposed on longer-term trends, an anomalous ‘pulse’ of uplift accumulated at many GNET stations during an approximate six-month period in 2010. This anomalous uplift is spatially correlated with the 2010 melting day anomaly. [less ▲]

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See detailElastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass lost
Khan, Shfaqat A.; Wahr, John; Stearns, Leigh A. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2007), 34(L21701), 1-6

The rapid unloading of ice from the southeastern sector of the Greenland ice sheet between 2001 and 2006 caused an elastic uplift of ~35 mm at a GPS site in Kulusuk. Most of the uplift results from ice ... [more ▼]

The rapid unloading of ice from the southeastern sector of the Greenland ice sheet between 2001 and 2006 caused an elastic uplift of ~35 mm at a GPS site in Kulusuk. Most of the uplift results from ice dynamic-induced volume losses on two nearby outlet glaciers. Volume loss from Helheim Glacier, calculated from sequential digital elevation models, contributes about ~16 mm of the observed uplift, with an additional ~5 mm from volume loss of Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier. The remaining uplift signal is attributed to significant melt-induced ice volume loss from the ice sheet margin along the southeast coast between 62°N and 66°N. [less ▲]

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