References of "Kessler, Julia 50002085"
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See detailDetection of Differentially Modified Pathogen Proteins by Western Blot after 2D Gel Electrophoresis and Identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF
Fack, F; Kessler, Julia UL; Pirrotte, P et al

in Stulik, J; Toman, R; Butaye, P (Eds.) et al BSL3 and BSL4 agents : proteomics, glycomics, and antigenicity (2011)

The detection of proteomic changes after viral infection, especially those which are due to post-translational modifications of host and pathogen proteins is of particular importance for the understanding ... [more ▼]

The detection of proteomic changes after viral infection, especially those which are due to post-translational modifications of host and pathogen proteins is of particular importance for the understanding of the fast interplay between pathogen and host components in viral infections. The characterization of modified isoforms of such proteins can benefit considerably from the combination of fluorescence labelled monospecific antibodies and 2D-DIGE differential proteomic studies. The potential of this approach is illustrated with a study of essential proteins in a measles virus-host cell system using small 2D gels and low sample amounts. [less ▲]

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See detailRevealing new measles virus transmission routes by use of sequence analysis of phosphoprotein and hemagglutinin genes.
Kessler, Julia UL; Kremer, Jacques R.; Shulga, Sergey V. et al

in Journal of Clinical Microbiology (2011), 49(2), 677-83

With improved measles virus (MV) control, the genetic variability of the MV-nucleoprotein hypervariable region (NP-HVR) decreases. Thus, it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the origin of a ... [more ▼]

With improved measles virus (MV) control, the genetic variability of the MV-nucleoprotein hypervariable region (NP-HVR) decreases. Thus, it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the origin of a virus using only this part of the genome. During outbreaks in Europe and Africa, we found MV strains with identical NP-HVR sequences. However, these strains showed considerable diversity within a larger sequencing window based on concatenated MV phosphoprotein and hemagglutinin genes (P/H pseudogenes). In Belarus, Germany, Russia, and the Democratic Republic of Congo, the P/H pseudogenes provided insights into chains of transmission, whereas identical NP-HVR provided none. In Russia, for instance, the P/H pseudogene identified temporal clusters rather than geographical clusters, demonstrating the circulation and importation of independent variants rather than large local outbreaks lasting for several years, as suggested by NP-HVR. Thus, by extending the sequencing window for molecular epidemiology, a more refined picture of MV circulation was obtained with more clearly defined links between outbreaks and transmission chains. Our results also suggested that in contrast to the P gene, the H gene acquired fixed substitutions that continued to be found in subsequent outbreaks, possibly with consequences for its antigenicity. Thus, a longer sequencing window has true benefits both for the epidemiological surveillance of measles and for the better monitoring of viral evolution. [less ▲]

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See detailImproving global virologic surveillance for measles and rubella.
Rota, Paul A.; Brown, Kevin E.; Hubschen, Judith M. et al

in Journal of Infectious Diseases (2011), 204 Suppl 1

An important aspect of laboratory surveillance for measles and rubella is the genetic characterization of circulating wild-type viruses to support molecular epidemiologic studies and to track transmission ... [more ▼]

An important aspect of laboratory surveillance for measles and rubella is the genetic characterization of circulating wild-type viruses to support molecular epidemiologic studies and to track transmission pathways. Virologic surveillance that is sufficient to document the interruption of transmission of measles and rubella viruses will be an essential criterion for verification of elimination. Laboratories in the World Health Organization (WHO) Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network have worked to improve and expand virologic surveillance as many regions move toward elimination of measles and rubella/congenital rubella syndrome. As countries approach elimination, it will be necessary to obtain genetic information from as many chains of transmission as possible. In addition, baseline virologic surveillance, especially for rubella, needs to be improved in many countries. This report contains a summary of recent improvements to the methods used for virologic surveillance. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay of measles virus with early induced cytokines reveals different wild type phenotypes.
Kessler, Julia UL; Kremer, Jacques R.; Muller, Claude P.

in Virus Research (2011), 155(1), 195-202

Differential effects of measles virus (MV) on the innate immune response may influence virus spread and severity of disease. Using a representative panel of 22 MV strains including 14 different genotypes ... [more ▼]

Differential effects of measles virus (MV) on the innate immune response may influence virus spread and severity of disease. Using a representative panel of 22 MV strains including 14 different genotypes, we found that wild-type (wt) differ considerably in their sensitivity to type I interferon (IFN). The wt virus production was 2-47-fold lower in IFN-alpha treated Vero/hSLAM cells, whereas vaccine virus production was reduced only 2-3-fold. Sequence analysis of the MV-P/C/V gene, revealed no obvious amino acid mutations that correlated with the different phenotypes. Strains also widely differed in their ability to induce type I IFN, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and other cytokines in human A549/hSLAM cells. Some wt strains that were highly sensitive to type I IFN induced only low levels of these and other cytokines. In vitro wt strains that produced the 5' copy-back defective interfering RNAs (5'cb-diRNA) characterized by Shingai et al. (2007), induced high levels of cytokines that otherwise were only reached by vaccine strains. These 5'cb-diRNAs emerged only in virus cultures during multiple passaging and were not detectable in clinical samples of measles patients. These subgenomic RNAs are an important confounding parameter in passaged wt viruses which must be carefully assessed in all in vitro studies. The present data show that MV wt strains differ in their sensitivity and their ability to temper with the innate immune response, which may result in differences in virulence. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic variability and mRNA editing frequencies of the phosphoprotein genes of wild-type measles viruses.
Bankamp, B.; Lopareva, E. N.; Kremer, J. R. et al

in Virus Research (2008), 135(2), 298-306

The sequences of the nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H) genes are routinely used for molecular epidemiologic studies of measles virus (MV). However, the amount of genetic diversity contained in other ... [more ▼]

The sequences of the nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H) genes are routinely used for molecular epidemiologic studies of measles virus (MV). However, the amount of genetic diversity contained in other genes of MV has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this report, the nucleotide sequences of the phosphoprotein (P) genes from 34 wild-type strains representing 15 genotypes of MV were analyzed and found to be almost as variable as the H genes but less variable than the N genes. Deduced amino acid sequences of the three proteins encoded by the P gene, P, V and C, demonstrated considerably higher variability than the H proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed the same tree topography for the P gene sequences as previously seen for the N and H genes. RNA editing of P gene transcripts affects the relative ratios of P and V proteins, which may have consequences for pathogenicity. Wild-type isolates produced more transcripts with more than one G insertion; however, there was no significant difference in the use of P and V open reading frames, suggesting that the relative amounts of P and V proteins in infected cells would be similar for both vaccine and wild-type strains. [less ▲]

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