References of "Kaysen, Anne 50002078"
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See detailSmall RNA profiling of low biomass samples: identification and removal of contaminants
Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Kaysen, Anne UL et al

in BMC Biology (2018), 16(52),

Background: Sequencing-based analyses of low-biomass samples are known to be prone to misinterpretation due to the potential presence of contaminating molecules derived from laboratory reagents and ... [more ▼]

Background: Sequencing-based analyses of low-biomass samples are known to be prone to misinterpretation due to the potential presence of contaminating molecules derived from laboratory reagents and environments. DNA contamination has been previously reported, however contamination with RNA is usually considered to be unlikely due to its inherent instability. Small RNAs (sRNAs) identified in tissues and bodily fluids such as blood plasma, have implications for physiology and pathology, and therefore the potential to act as disease biomarkers. Thus, the possibility for RNA contaminants demands a careful evaluation. Results: Here we report the presence of small RNA contaminants in widely used microRNA extraction kits and propose an approach for their depletion. We sequenced sRNAs extracted from human plasma samples and detected important levels of non-human (exogenous) sequences whose source could be traced to the microRNA extraction columns through a careful qPCR-based analysis of several laboratory reagents. Furthermore, we also detected the presence of artefactual sequences related to these contaminants in a range of published datasets, arguing for a re-evaluation of reports suggesting the presence of exogenous RNAs of microbial and dietary origins in blood plasma. To avoid artefacts in future experiments, we also devise several protocols of contaminant RNAs, define minimal amounts of starting material for artefact-free analyses, and confirm the reduction of contaminant levels for identification of bona fide sequences using ‘ultra-clean’ extraction kits. Conclusion: This is the first report of the presence of RNA molecules as contaminants in RNA extraction kits. The described protocols should be applied in the future to avoid confounding sRNA studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation of nucleic acids from low biomass samples: detection and removal of sRNA contaminants
Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Kaysen, Anne UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Sequencing-based analyses of low-biomass samples are known to be prone to misinterpretation due to the potential presence of contaminating molecules derived from laboratory reagents and environments. Due ... [more ▼]

Sequencing-based analyses of low-biomass samples are known to be prone to misinterpretation due to the potential presence of contaminating molecules derived from laboratory reagents and environments. Due to its inherent instability, contamination with RNA is usually considered to be unlikely. Here we report the presence of small RNA (sRNA) contaminants in widely used microRNA extraction kits and means for their depletion. Sequencing of sRNAs extracted from human plasma samples was performed and significant levels of non-human (exogenous) sequences were detected. The source of the most abundant of these sequences could be traced to the microRNA extraction columns by qPCR-based analysis of laboratory reagents. The presence of artefactual sequences originating from the confirmed contaminants were furthermore replicated in a range of published datasets. To avoid artefacts in future experiments, several protocols for the removal of the contaminants were elaborated, minimal amounts of starting material for artefact-free analyses were defined, and the reduction of contaminant levels for identification of bona fide sequences using 'ultra-clean' extraction kits was confirmed. In conclusion, this is the first report of the presence of RNA molecules as contaminants in laboratory reagents. The described protocols should be applied in the future to avoid confounding sRNA studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIMP: a pipeline for reproducible referenceindependent integrated metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses
Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Jarosz, Yohan UL; Muller, Emilie UL et al

in Genome Biology (2016), 17

Existing workflows for the analysis of multi-omic microbiome datasets are lab-specific and often result in sub-optimal data usage. Here we present IMP, a reproducible and modular pipeline for the ... [more ▼]

Existing workflows for the analysis of multi-omic microbiome datasets are lab-specific and often result in sub-optimal data usage. Here we present IMP, a reproducible and modular pipeline for the integrated and reference-independent analysis of coupled metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. IMP incorporates robust read preprocessing, iterative co-assembly, analyses of microbial community structure and function, automated binning, as well as genomic signature-based visualizations. The IMP-based data integration strategy enhances data usage, output volume, and output quality as demonstrated using relevant use-cases. Finally, IMP is encapsulated within a user-friendly implementation using Python and Docker. IMP is available at http://r3lab.uni.lu/web/imp/ (MIT license). [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic change of host gastrointestinal microbiome and immune status in relation to mucosal barrier effects during chemotherapy and immune ablative intervention in humans
Kaysen, Anne UL; Heintz-Buschart, Anna UL; Lebrun, Laura UL et al

Poster (2014, April)

The human gastrointestinal tract is colonized by communities of endogenous microbes, commonly referred to as the microbiome. Here, the microbiota are in close contact with the host intestinal mucosa and ... [more ▼]

The human gastrointestinal tract is colonized by communities of endogenous microbes, commonly referred to as the microbiome. Here, the microbiota are in close contact with the host intestinal mucosa and its innate and adaptive immune systems. The fact that certain stimuli induce an inflammatory response whereas others induce tolerance suggests, that the host immune system interacts with the microbiota and vice versa in different ways. However, the exact details of theses interactions remain largely unknown. It is known that cancer treatment can result in severe adverse effects like mucositis and in combination with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (Tx), in graft-versus host disease (GvHD). However, there is at present only sparse information available on the effects of chemotherapy on the intestinal microbiota and resulting changes in microbiome-immune system interactions. Almost no data exists on the effect of allogeneic stem cell Tx on the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota. In this project, we are studying the complex interactions between the host and the intestinal microbiota after chemotherapy with or without allogeneic Tx and the occurrence of severe adverse side effects such as mucositis and GvHD. Using a systems biology approach including metagenomics and RNAseq, fecal samples and blood plasma samples from patients undergoing these treatments for malignancies will be analysed to identify the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome and bacterial small RNAs. The main research hypothesis is that there are quantitative and qualitative changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome following chemotherapy and allogeneic Tx which are linked to the immune status of the patients and possible treatment side-effects, in particular mucositis and GvHD. We aim to provide knowledge on how the host's intestinal mucosa and immune system influence the gastrointestinal microbiome and on the role and involvement of the gastrointestinal microbiota in development in mucositis and GvHD. Importantly, this could help in the formulation of measures to prevent mucositis and GvHD development. [less ▲]

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