References of "Karavdic, Senad 50002073"
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See detailRehabilitation of People with Psychiatric Disabilities in Sheltered Workshop in Luxembourg: Employment Facilities as a Social Pillar for Vulnerable Groups
Karavdic, Senad UL; Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL

in The 9th International Conference of the Faculty of Education and Rehabilitation Sciences University of Zagreb (2017, May)

People with mental and psychiatric disabilities are globally and historically the most neglected and overlooked group in the matter of experienced social exclusion and discrimination at the labour market ... [more ▼]

People with mental and psychiatric disabilities are globally and historically the most neglected and overlooked group in the matter of experienced social exclusion and discrimination at the labour market. The European Pillar on social rights, recently launched by the European Commission, underlines the importance of equal opportunities and access to the labour market for everyone. In regard to this, fair working conditions and active support to employment should also be provided for people with psychiatric disabilities. Employment for people with psychiatric problems still remains a problematic issue, reaching an unemployment rate of about 90% among the most vulnerable groups with the chronical condition such as psychosis. Insufficient stress resilience, pre-existing scarring effects, socioeconomic vulnerability coupled to constrained mental health literacy among employers are some of the main barriers that people with psychiatric disabilities may face as they move towards and into their work. In addition, the fluctuating mental state of a person linked to specificity and heterogeneous evolutions of mental illness has led to rethinking classical models of support, challenging new concepts used until now for physical or sensory disabilities. Initially created to welcome people out of psychiatry, emerging from the acute phase of the illness towards the resocialisation and professional adjustment, sheltered workshop for persons with psychiatric disabilities nowadays promotes new environment, such as supported & therapeutic, i.e. proximity-orientated and individually adapted to the abilities of the person. In order to enhance inclusion by sustainable employment, services have to be proactive, provide gateways to employment, foster psychosocial recovery of the people during their stay and assist them in managing their mental health problems after their placement. Our presentation stresses the Luxembourgish ATP-Model which offers an individual service for people with psychiatric problems; to cope with labour market related challenges and in-situ job coaching perspectives. However, this requires rethinking the traditional assignment of social work. [less ▲]

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See detailLife satisfaction of non-mobile vs.mobile postgraduates intra EU and outside EU Universities, and its associations with mental health and career attitudes.
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Innovative ideas in Health Psychology (2017)

Specific attention should be devoted to the needs of young adults enrolled in a mobility abroad programme of their universities. Among mobile vs. non-mobile postgraduates, our study analysed their life ... [more ▼]

Specific attention should be devoted to the needs of young adults enrolled in a mobility abroad programme of their universities. Among mobile vs. non-mobile postgraduates, our study analysed their life satisfaction (LS) as well as the associations with mental health-related factors and career attitudes. We determined factors contributing to their LS. Method. In 2012/13, three groups (non-mobile = 66; mobile intra-EU = 382; mobile outside-EU = 44) who had obtained a financial aid from the Luxembourgish government, without family’s socioeconomic criteria. Master students completed an online questionnaire, and analyses included multiple linear regression models in which only relationships (p<0.05) were introduced. Results. Further mobility showed higher levels of LS (outside-EU 8.5/10, intra-EU 7.8 and 7.9 non-mobile). For all groups, health satisfaction (HS) was positively correlated with LS; for mobile outside-EU, it is the only determinant. For mobile intra-EU, the quality of their autonomy and their career adaptability were also associated to LS (regression parameter estimates β: 0.208 and 0.128, respectively), and worry (β:-0.146). For non-mobile, in addition to HS, their career optimism and planning were positively correlated to their LS (β: 0.402 and 0.214, respectively). Conclusion. Promoting programmes proposed by the universities’ services towards counselling and an accompaniment to their career project may enhance postgraduates’ LS which is a major indicator for a successful mobility. The assessment of outside-EU’ LS was higher than the EU-28 LS’ indicator (age group 25-34 years; in 2013: 7.5/10). More cross-cultural research would be warranted to better understand the etiology of their LS. [less ▲]

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See detailDisparities in Career Attitudes among Postgraduate Students
Karavdic, Senad UL; Odero, Angela UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL et al

in Pascana, Clara (Ed.) Psychology Applications & Developments II (2016)

The preparation of students’ future career trajectories is a dynamic process in relation with social and educational determinants. Our objective is to analyse the associations between generic employment ... [more ▼]

The preparation of students’ future career trajectories is a dynamic process in relation with social and educational determinants. Our objective is to analyse the associations between generic employment capabilities, career attitudes and related factors among postgraduate students. All masters’ students registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education (CEDIES) database in Luxembourg were contacted by post to participate in an online questionnaire. The five point scale questionnaire was scored as follows: 1) Dynamic Career Attitudes (DCA); 2) Employability Soft-Skills (ESS); 3) Search for Work Self-Efficacy (SWSES); 4) Quality of Life domain Autonomy (QLA); and 5) Socio-demographic characteristics. The data were analysed using bivariate tests, correlations and multiple linear regression models. 481 of the volunteers (26.4 years; SD=5.5) were predominantly women, Luxembourgish, unemployed and had less than or equal to six months of job experience. The higher the ESS, SWSES and QLA scores, the higher the DCA score was. Nationality, being unemployed, having less than six months job experience and being in the first year of a Master’s degree programme were associated with a lower dynamic career attitude score. The Dynamic Career Attitudes scale seems to be an appropriate instrument to evaluate the efficacy of the university career services programme. [less ▲]

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See detailLife Satisfaction between Non-Luxembourgish and Native Luxembourgish Postgraduate Students
Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Sociology Migration and Integration (2015)

Life satisfaction (LS) is a potential key to social progress and contributes to the functioning of individuals. In Luxembourg, the postgraduates who receive financial aid from the government are ... [more ▼]

Life satisfaction (LS) is a potential key to social progress and contributes to the functioning of individuals. In Luxembourg, the postgraduates who receive financial aid from the government are registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education. In order to obtain the financial aid, one of the criteria dictates that one of the parents of foreign students should have been working in Luxembourg for at least 5 years. In this country, which is built on migration (46% of the resident population consists of foreigners), is the basis on which our scientific questions are raised: (1) between non-Luxembourgish and native Luxembourgish students is the LS different? (2) What respective relationships exist with mental health-related factors, career attributes, socio-economic characteristics, and LS? (3) What are their associations of mental health (health satisfaction, psychological quality of life, worry), perception of financial situation and career attributes (adaptability, optimism, knowledge, planning) on LS? Between 2012 and 2013, 644 postgraduates were contacted by post to complete an online questionnaire in English or French. Foreign postgraduates who are settled in Luxembourg (born in Luxembourg and did not have the Luxembourgish citizenship, N=147) and native students (born in Luxembourg and had the nationality, N=284), were compared. Postgraduates who were born in Luxembourg but did not have the citizenship or were not born in Luxembourg and had the Luxembourgish citizenship were excluded. A single item measured LS (1 = not at all satisfied to 10 = very satisfied) same as in the European quality of life survey. Bivariate tests, correlations and multiple linear models were used, in which only significant relationships (p< 0.05) were integrated. Between the two groups, no differences exist between LS’ indicators (7.8/10 non-Luxembourgish; 8.0/10 natives), both of which is higher than the European indicator 7.2/10 (for 25-34 years). However, non-Luxembourgish students are older than natives are (29.3 years vs. 26.3 years), perceive their financial situation as more difficult, and a higher percentage of their parents have an education level higher than a Bachelor's degree (father 59.2% vs 44.6% for natives; mother 51.4% vs 33.7% for natives). In addition, father’s education is related to postgraduates’ LS and the higher is their level, the greater is their contribution to LS. Whereas for the native students, the better their health satisfaction, and career optimism is, the higher their LS are. For the both group, mental health-related factors, perception of their financial situation, career optimism, adaptability, and planning are linked to LS. The higher their psychological quality of life is, the better is their LS. Good health and favourable attitudes related to the job market enhance their LS. [less ▲]

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See detailWorries and career employment attitudes: the role of social inequalities of master’s degree students.
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Promotion of Mental Health (2015)

University students' mental health is affected by worries about the employment of their future. Our purpose is to analyze the relationships between traits of worry and career attitudes, happiness and ... [more ▼]

University students' mental health is affected by worries about the employment of their future. Our purpose is to analyze the relationships between traits of worry and career attitudes, happiness and autonomy in their quality of life among postgraduates. Method: Independent of their socioeconomic status, all students obtained financial aid from the government of Luxembourg. A link to an online questionnaire was sent to their home address. The instrument assessed: Penn-State-Worry scale, Career dimensions (adaptability, optimism, knowledge and planning), Happiness and Quality of Life Autonomy scores, and sociodemographic characteristics. Bivariate-tests, correlations and multiple linear regression models were used for analysis. Results: A majority of the 481 volunteers (26.4 years; SD=5.5) were women and unemployed. Sociodemographical factors such as European or non-EU nationality (vs. Luxembourgish), possession of an internship employment contract (vs. fixed-term and permanent contract) and being a part of social and humanity sciences domain were related with high worries. Lower adaptability (β= -2.271; p< 0.001) and optimism career attitudes (β= -2.162; p= 0.002), low happiness (β= -1.518; p= 0.039) and autonomy in their quality of life (β= -0.669; p= 0.004), respectively, were affected by higher worry score. Conclusion: Worry indicator could be observed routinely to monitor students’ career adaptability and optimism. University career employment workshops may help to increase the individual capabilities to improve and/or to maintain their well-being. Nationality, employment contract status and chosen academic field had generated mental health inequalities that must be considered in consultations, counseling and implementation of prevention and promotion programs. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents’ Well-being: Impacts of studying out-EU and perceived autonomy on the Psychological Quality of Life
Bucki, Barbara UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL et al

in European Health Psychologist (The) (2015), special

Introduction: With an increasing number of university students in preparation of their entrance in the labor market, the wellbeing of the postgraduates became a priority for many universities. Despite ... [more ▼]

Introduction: With an increasing number of university students in preparation of their entrance in the labor market, the wellbeing of the postgraduates became a priority for many universities. Despite numerous studies on this topic, respective relationships of wellbeing and other psychosocial factors still remain unclear. Aims: (1) to assess Psychological Quality of Life of postgraduates who study in Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (GDL), EU and non – EU countries; (2) to analyze its associations with their socio-economic,health and employability related cofactors. Method: All masters’ students registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education (CEDIES) database in GDL were contacted by mail to participate at an online questionnaire (in English or French) measuring: 1. Psychological Whoqol-bref (6 items) (dependent variable) 2. Wellbeing attributes: Quality of Life Autonomy, Health Satisfaction, and Penn state worry questionnaire (Worries). 3. Employability attributes: Search for Work Self Efficacy scale (SWSES), Career Goals setting. 4. Perceived financial situation and socio-demographic characteristics. Respondents who did not mention the country of their studies were excluded from the analysis. Bivariate tests and correlations were performed for association analyses between the variables. Only significant relationships (p<0.05) were used in the multiple linear model. Results: 490 participants were volunteers from which 13.5% study in Luxembourg, 77.8% in an EU country and 8.7% in a non EU country. Majority were women, with exception for those studying in non-EU countries who were mainly men. Participants studying in GDL were older than those studying abroad. Natives of Luxembourg were prevalent with higher percentages among those who study in a non EU-country. Those studying in non-EU showed significantly (p<0.05) higher Psychological Quality of Life (M=76.8; SD=12.8) than those in GDL (M=74.5;SD=12.6) respectively in EU (M=71.4; SD=15.3). While participants differ in their QoL-Autonomy score there isn’t any significant difference in their career goals setting, Search for work self efficacy, Health satisfaction, Worries and Perceived financial situation across the country of study.Conclusion: Better psychological quality of life mobilized the capability of students to study abroad, which is related to better wellbeing attributes. However this relationship remains true only for students studying in Non-EU countries. Implementing workshops to increase individual self-efficacy towards a future employment may improve and/or maintain wellbeing of academics and limit so, respective social inequalities. [less ▲]

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See detailDes souffrances multiples à la souffrance paroxystique.
Karavdic, Senad UL; Bucki, Barbara UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pensée plurielle (2015), 2015/1(N°38), 9-22

The purpose of our study is to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms playing a role in the deconstruction of mental suffering. With the support of the Luxembourgish RE.SO.NORD (REseau du ... [more ▼]

The purpose of our study is to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms playing a role in the deconstruction of mental suffering. With the support of the Luxembourgish RE.SO.NORD (REseau du centre SOcial de la région du NORD), a diagnosis of the sufferings of people living in rural districts was completed with the first-line health and social professionals who work with their clients on a daily basis. Twenty-six professionals participated in interviews during which they described the sufferings of their clients. They appeared as the effects of a drift and show how the amplification process of psychic sufferings (permanent anxiety, depression, etc.) and the accumulation of social and family factors (job loss, family separation, etc.) can lead to the emergence of critical mental health conditions. In this logic of paroxystic gradation, mental health problems may aggregate a set of harmful behaviors. This gradation illustrates the state achieved by the clients when their intimate and social domains of life are impeded. The paroxystic suffering represents the state during which the individual seems to fail to cope with their sufferings and is no longer able to recover. The professionals recognize a lack of information and incentive during medical consultation in which their clients dread the fear of being stigmatized. They admit the existence of poor coordination and access to primary health care and a lack of support for those who suffer and their family caregivers in order to prepare them to become actors that can mobilize their "health capability". [less ▲]

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See detailUndergraduate students’ life satisfaction, between employability and career capabilities
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pracana, Clara (Ed.) Social Psychology (2015)

Assessment of life satisfaction (LS) is an important issue in the overall preparation of undergraduates towards an employment outcome. The aim of our study is to analyze the associations between LS and ... [more ▼]

Assessment of life satisfaction (LS) is an important issue in the overall preparation of undergraduates towards an employment outcome. The aim of our study is to analyze the associations between LS and socio-demographic factors, career attitudes, employability soft skills, academic work satisfaction and quality of life autonomy. Methods: Undergraduate students were invited to complete a paper pencil questionnaire exploring: Life satisfaction (LS), Dynamic Career Attitudes (DCA), Employability Soft-Skills (ESS-Short), academic Work Satisfaction (WS), Quality Life of Autonomy (QoLA) and socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, educational field, year of study, work experience (less vs. more than 6 months and actual employment). Data were analyzed using correlation and multiple linear regression models. Results: 124 volunteers (22.6 years) had LS of 75.4/100. Majority were women, in the first year of Bachelor, and in applied management. Most of them had six months or less of job experiences and were unemployed. Higher the DCA, ESS-Short, QoLA and WS better was the students LS. Conclusions: LS is an indicator related with employability and career capabilities. Supporting students through wellness and career activities program in autonomy-supportive environment, to cope with their stressful period and to enhance their generic employment and career capabilities may allow to the undergraduates to maintain their LS. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic career attitudes among master students: Social disparities in employment capabilities.
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pracana, Clara (Ed.) Social Psychology (2015)

The preparation of students’ future career trajectories is a dynamic process in relation with social and educational determinants, but their interactions must be further investigated. Our objective is to ... [more ▼]

The preparation of students’ future career trajectories is a dynamic process in relation with social and educational determinants, but their interactions must be further investigated. Our objective is to analyze the associations between generic employment capabilities, career attitudes and other related factors among postgraduate students. Method: All master's students recorded in the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education from Luxembourg database were contacted by letter to participate in an online questionnaire. The online questionnaire (French and English) with five scales was scored: 1) Dynamic Career Attitudes (DCA- 13 items); 2) Employability Soft-Skills (ESS-14); 3) Search for Work Self-Efficacy (SWSES - 12 items); 4) Quality of Life domain Autonomy (QLA- 4 items); and 5) Socio-demographical characteristics. The data were analyzed using bivariate tests, correlations and multiple linear regression models. Results: Of the 481 volunteers (26.4 years; SD=5.5) a majority were women, Luxembourgish, unemployed, and had less than or equal to six months of job experiences. Higher the ESS, SWSES and QLA scores, higher was the DCA score. Nationality, being unemployed, having less than six months of job experiences and being in the first year of master were associated with lower Dynamic Career Attitudes score. Conclusion: Covering the whole period of the master’s degree, internship activities and proactive workshops may be developed to improve generic employment capabilities and quality of autonomy. The Dynamic Career Attitudes scale appears an appropriate instrument to evaluate the efficacy of the university career services programme. [less ▲]

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See detailIndividual Differences in Learning Difficulty
Chau, Kénora; Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in InPACT 2014: International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2014)

Correlates of adolescent learning difficulty may include a number of issues sustained across the life course but this is little documented. This study assessed the associations of learning difficulty with ... [more ▼]

Correlates of adolescent learning difficulty may include a number of issues sustained across the life course but this is little documented. This study assessed the associations of learning difficulty with socioeconomic, behavior and health-related difficulties in early adolescence. This study included 1,559 middle-school adolescents from north-eastern France, who completed a self-administered questionnaire gathering socioeconomic characteristics (gender, age, nationality, family structure, father’s occupation, and family income), measured body mass index, alcohol/tobacco/cannabis/hard drug use, health status, back pain, allergy, depressive symptoms (Kandel scale), sustained physical/verbal violence, sexual abuse, social support, learning difficulty (a 4-item scale: lesson understanding, concentration/lesson learning, follow school pace/constraints, and school interrogations, range 0-4), grade repetition, low school performance (last trimester, <10/20), and school dropout contemplation at 16 years. Data were analyzed using multiple linear and logistic regression models. Learning difficulty score was strongly related to grade repetition (gender-age-adjusted odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.38-1.76), low school performance (2.39, 2.08-2.75) and school dropout contemplation (1.79, 1.50-2.13). Learning difficulty was strongly related to socioeconomic factors (gaRC reaching 0.76). It was also related to alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, and hard drug use (0.22, 0.74, 0.71 and 1.25, respectively), overweight (0.17), obesity (0.43), poor health status (0.45), back pain (0.21), allergy (0.11), depressive symptoms (0.69), sustained violence (0.41), sexual abuse (0.72), and poor social support (0.22). These associations were partly explained by socioeconomic factors (contribution reaching 54% for various factors; it was 109% for alcohol use). These findings suggest that prevention to limit learning difficulty and promote school achievement should focus on socioeconomic, behavior and health-related difficulties in early adolescence. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations between Psycho-Educational Determinants and Dynamic Career Attitudes among undergradutes students
Karavdic, Senad UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

in Pracana, Clara (Ed.) Psychology Applications & Developments - Advances in Psychology and Psychological Trends Series (2014)

Monitoring and assessment of career attitudes are critical for the student’s preparation for an adapted university-to-work transition. This problem remains partially addressed though optimal services ... [more ▼]

Monitoring and assessment of career attitudes are critical for the student’s preparation for an adapted university-to-work transition. This problem remains partially addressed though optimal services proposed by universities which may enhance students’ generic career capabilities. Our study explored the relationships between the psycho-educational and socio-demographic factors, and the perception of their career attitudes. Bachelor students in social sciences, engineering, applied management from University of Luxembourg were invited to complete a paper pencil questionnaire. Data were analyzed using correlation and multiple linear regression models. Of 278 students, 124 participated. The majority studied applied management, were women, unemployed and with six months or less of job experiences. The search for work self-efficacy score is linked to the employability soft-skills and job search techniques scores which are, in parallel, with the quality of life autonomy associated to the dynamic career attitudes. Greater are employability, search for work and quality of life autonomy, the higher are dynamic career attitudes. Students who were in their final academic year also had greater career capabilities. These findings may help to elaborate interventions aiming at improving psycho-educational determinants. It must be stimulated at the entry to university with appropriately collaborative supports, pedagogical workshops and interpersonal trainings. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst-year at university: the effect of academic employability skills and physical quality of life on students’ well-being.
Baumann, Michèle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL

in Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation (2014), 49

With increasing access at European universities, supporting and promoting the high education, students’ mental well-being and generic employability capacities have become priorities, but their respective ... [more ▼]

With increasing access at European universities, supporting and promoting the high education, students’ mental well-being and generic employability capacities have become priorities, but their respective influences, after an adaptation period of seven months, remain unclear. <br />OBJECTIVE: To analyse the relationships between students’ well-being and self-perceived academic employability skills, and other social and environmental factors. METHODS: 321 freshmen students at the end of their first year completed an online questionnaire. Two instruments were used to assess well-being: the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which explores psychological suffering, and the psychological quality of life subdomain of the Whoqol-bref. RESULTS: Psychological Whoqol-bref scores are linked to the academic employability skills (AES) items of drafting, critical spirit, problem-solving, teamwork, and supervision/direction of others, and has positive effects on AES score and on the following Whoqol-bref domains: physical, social relationships and environmental. Although three of six psychological Whoqol-bref items (ability to concentrate, satisfaction with self, negative feelings) are correlated with GHQ-12 items (sleeping, decision-making, feeling under strain, problem-solving, depression, self-confidence, thinking about self, feeling happy). GHQ-12 score is negatively linked with Whoqol-bref physical. CONCLUSIONS: For better quality of life, and improved employability skills, innovative activities should be developed to ascertain the sustainable academic's abilities of students. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat factors can enhance Dynamic Career Attitudes of University students?
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in InPACT International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2014)

In order to develop a University programme to prepare students for the demands of the job market our experimental study analyzes the relationships between the job search capabilities, the employability ... [more ▼]

In order to develop a University programme to prepare students for the demands of the job market our experimental study analyzes the relationships between the job search capabilities, the employability soft-skills, the domain autonomy of the quality of life and the dynamic career attitudes. During a class, 46 undergraduate students were invited to complete a self-administered paper pencil questionnaire that explores the Job search capabilities (JSC=26 items), Employability soft-skills (ESS 32 items), Quality of life autonomy domain (QoLA 4 items), and the Dynamic career attitudes (DCA 16 items). Each instrument was scored from 0 to 100. Correlation and multiple linear regression models were used for the analysis. 43 students have participated. (1) The JSC score is linked to the ESS score (r=0.561; p=0.000). (2) The ESS score, and QoL-autonomy scores are correlated to DCA score (r=0.644, p=0.000; respectively, r=0.595, p=0.000). Enhancing dynamic carrier attitudes could be stimulated with pedagogical workshops and interpersonal trainings developing students’ autonomy and employability abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailIndividual Differences in Learning Difficulty
Chau, Kénora; Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2014)

Correlates of adolescent learning difficulty may include a number of issues sustained across the life course but this is little documented. This study assessed the associations of learning difficulty with ... [more ▼]

Correlates of adolescent learning difficulty may include a number of issues sustained across the life course but this is little documented. This study assessed the associations of learning difficulty with socioeconomic, behavior and health-related difficulties in early adolescence. This study included 1,559 middle-school adolescents from north-eastern France, who completed a self-administered questionnaire gathering socioeconomic characteristics (gender, age, nationality, family structure, father’s occupation, and family income), measured body mass index, alcohol/tobacco/cannabis/hard drug use, health status, back pain, allergy, depressive symptoms (Kandel scale), sustained physical/verbal violence, sexual abuse, social support, learning difficulty (a 4-item scale: lesson understanding, concentration/lesson learning, follow school pace/constraints, and school interrogations, range 0-4), grade repetition, low school performance (last trimester, <10/20), and school dropout contemplation at 16 years. Data were analyzed using multiple linear and logistic regression models. Learning difficulty score was strongly related to grade repetition (gender-age-adjusted odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.38-1.76), low school performance (2.39, 2.08-2.75) and school dropout contemplation (1.79, 1.50-2.13). Learning difficulty was strongly related to socioeconomic factors (gaRC reaching 0.76). It was also related to alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, and hard drug use (0.22, 0.74, 0.71 and 1.25, respectively), overweight (0.17), obesity (0.43), poor health status (0.45), back pain (0.21), allergy (0.11), depressive symptoms (0.69), sustained violence (0.41), sexual abuse (0.72), and poor social support (0.22). These associations were partly explained by socioeconomic factors (contribution reaching 54% for various factors; it was 109% for alcohol use). These findings suggest that prevention to limit learning difficulty and promote school achievement should focus on socioeconomic, behavior and health-related difficulties in early adolescence. [less ▲]

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See detailPositive Career Attitudes Effect on Happiness and Life Satisfaction by Master Students and Graduates
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Open Journal of Social Sciences (2014), 2

Background: Happiness and life satisfaction are well-known indicators. However, there has been little contribution by the scientific community on the positive career attitudes of master students and ... [more ▼]

Background: Happiness and life satisfaction are well-known indicators. However, there has been little contribution by the scientific community on the positive career attitudes of master students and graduates. In an effort to provide deeper empirical understanding, the relationships between positive career attitudes, health satisfaction, financial situation and happiness and life satisfaction among master students and graduates were analyzed. Method: A link of online questionnaire was sent by mail to all students which independently of their social economic status obtained a financial aid from the government of Luxembourg, and to all master graduates (ex-students) who havebeen finished with their courses for one year. The data was analyzed using bivariate tests, correlation and multiple linear regression models. Result: 455 voluntary postgraduate/master students vs. 144 graduates participated. Students were younger than the graduates (mean age 26 vs. 29 years). Majority was female and had Luxembourgish nationality. Most graduates had a job and lived with their parents. Luxembourg natives were happier, and those who were living with their parents showed higher life satisfaction. For both samples, self-rated health satisfaction was positively associated with happiness and life satisfaction. For the students, the higher career adaptability and career optimism are, the better the happiness and life satisfaction will be. The higher the perception of the household financial situation is, the better the happiness will be. For graduates, the higher career optimism contributed to the better happiness. Conclusion: Happiness and life satisfaction of master students and graduates were affected, related to socioeconomic and perceived health difficulties, and career attitudes. Those indicators could be used routinely to monitor the situation of young people over time and their needs in terms of adaptability and optimism capabilities, which should be appropriately treated. These findings may help with the development of university and post university interventions aimed at improving happiness and life satisfaction among postgraduate students and ex-students. [less ▲]

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See detailDéconstruction du processus cumulatif et d’amplification des souffrances :les effets d’une dérive…
Baumann, Michèle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL

in Les Déterminants de la santé (2014)

A partir du discours de professionnels de proximité qui côtoient au quotidien les souffrances psychiques de leurs clients, nos objectifs ont été d’analyser les principaux problèmes de santé mentale et les ... [more ▼]

A partir du discours de professionnels de proximité qui côtoient au quotidien les souffrances psychiques de leurs clients, nos objectifs ont été d’analyser les principaux problèmes de santé mentale et les facteurs psychosociaux qui contribuent à l’émergence des souffrances, et participent à leur maintien ou leur développement, et de déterminer leurs besoins et les actions qui pourraient être entreprises pour y répondre. Notre problématique s’inscrit une compréhension des processus présents dans la construction et la reconstruction des souffrances des clients des services sociaux et de santé. Comme aucune information n’existe sur l’accès aux soins en milieu rural, notre étude a tenté d’aborder les mécanismes de la souffrance décrits par les professionnels de proximité. Notre approche a été guidée par les questions suivantes: si la souffrance résulte d’une vision de l’individu sur sa propre existence, quelles valeurs entrent en jeu ? Si la souffrance est appréhendée comme la résultante d’une conduite particulière, dans quelle mesure est-elle aussi un produit social ? Quelles sont les interventions qui couvriraient les besoins de cette clientèle ? Quelles sont les actions qui les amèneraient à acquérir des capacités personnelles et des capabilités sociales pour s’opposer aux effets des souffrances ? Comment lorsque les souffrances interagissent de concert dans des contextes qui leur sont propices, mènent-elles les personnes aux dérives d’un état psychique qui se détériore ? La liste des professionnels de première ligne travaillant auprès de personnes âgées de 18 à 65 ans issues des communes rurales a été établie avec l’aide du comité de pilotage du RE.SO.NORD (REseau du centre SOcial de la région du NORD). Un entretien semi-structuré d’une durée de plus d’une heure a été mené en face à face. A partir des retranscriptions des discours des professionnels, une analyse de contenu a été menée. Les professionnels de proximité ayant participé à l’enquête (sept médecins généralistes, trois psychiatres, neuf assistants sociaux, trois psychologues et sept travailleurs sociaux ; moyenne d’âge 42 ans, dont les femmes sont légèrement plus nombreuses) décrivent les effets d’une dérive en montrant comment les mécanismes en jeu produisent des processus d’amplification des problèmes neuropsychiatriques et d’accumulation des facteurs psychosociaux, et comment ces souffrances peuvent aboutir à des états de santé mentale critiques. Dans cette logique de gradation, les problèmes de santé mentale viennent s’agréger à un ensemble de comportements délétères. Cette gradation illustre un état que les clients atteignent lorsque les sphères intime et sociale se dégradent de concert. Elle représente cet état au cours duquel les personnes semblent avoir comme perdu face à leurs souffrances et ne parviennent plus à s’en relever. Car la di fficulté majeure rencontrée par leurs clients ne réside pas tant dans l’existence avérée d’une souffrance, mais dans l’incapacité à la surmonter. La souffrance dite « émotionnelle » désigne le caractère privé de l’existence et concerne les aspects tels que les comportements liés à l’addiction, aux troubles neuropsychiatriques et psychologiques, aux anxiétés existentielles profondes, et aux conséquences que ces problèmes engendrent sur le bien-être mental via les maladies mentales, font ici sens au regard d’une souffrance, à tout le moins personnelle. La détresse d’ordre psychique agit alors comme le révélateur de la souffrance vécue lorsque la sphère intime de leur existence se dégrade. Quant à a souffrance dite « sociale » est le résultat de l’angoisse perçue quant à la dégradation de leur qualité de vie. Elle se réfère aux conditions psychologiques de vie ainsi qu’aux conditions matérielles de l’e xistence telles que le travail, le logement, le revenu, autant de facteurs qui, lorsque leur pérennité devient incertaine, et affecte la satisfaction à l’égard de la vie des personnes et de son entourage. La mise en avant d’une interaction résultant du choc des sphères émotionnelle et sociale montre qu’un problème survient rarement seul. La question qui demeure, est celle de comprendre si la présence simultanée de divers problèmes découle d’un effet en cascade, du glissement d’un problème vers un autre ou de la présence de facteurs de risque communs à l’apparition de cette souffrance. Dans la mesure où les souffrances sont multiples et s’interpénètrent, les observations des professionnels ont tenté de mettre au jour l’attention particulière qu’il est nécessaire de porter au développement conjoint des diverses trajectoires problématiques, et de leurs comorbidités. Les pistes d’action vers lesquels aboutissent nos résultats s’inscrivent dans les objectifs [less ▲]

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See detailPositive Career Attitudes Effect on Happiness and Life Satisfaction by Master Students and Graduates
Karavdic, Senad UL

in The international Conference on Positive Psychology and Well-being (2014)

Background: Happiness and life satisfaction are well-known indicators. However, there has been little contribution by the scientific community on the positive career attitudes of master students and ... [more ▼]

Background: Happiness and life satisfaction are well-known indicators. However, there has been little contribution by the scientific community on the positive career attitudes of master students and graduates. In an effort to provide deeper empirical understanding, the relationships between positive career attitudes, health satisfaction, financial situation and happiness and life satisfaction among master students and graduates were analyzed. Method: A link of online questionnaire was sent by mail to all students which independently of their social economic status obtained a financial aid from the government of Luxembourg, and to all master graduates (ex-students) who have been finished with their courses for one year. The data was analyzed using bivariate tests, correlation and multiple linear regression models. Result: 455 voluntary postgraduate/master students vs. 144 graduates participated. Students were younger than the graduates (mean age 26 vs. 29 years). Majority was female and had Luxembourgish nationality. Most graduates had a job and lived with their parents. Luxembourg natives were happier, and those who were living with their parents showed higher life satisfaction. For both samples, self-rated health satisfaction was positively associated with happiness and life satisfaction. For the students, the higher career adaptability and career optimism are, the better the happiness and life satisfaction will be. The higher the perception of the household financial situation is, the better the happiness will be. For graduates, the higher career optimism contributed to the better happiness. Conclusion: Happiness and life satisfaction of master students and graduates were affected, related to socioeconomic and perceived health difficulties, and career attitudes. Those indicators could be used routinely to monitor the situation of young people over time and their needs in terms of adaptability and optimism capabilities, which should be appropriately treated. These findings may help with the development of university and post university interventions aimed at improving happiness and life satisfaction among postgraduate students and ex-students. [less ▲]

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See detailLes souffrances des clients des communes rurales du nord identifiées par les professionnels de proximité du domaine social et de la santé qui les côtoient au quotidien et leurs besoins pour y remédier
Karavdic, Senad UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Les souffrances des clients des communes rurales du nord identifiées par les professionnels de proximité du domaine social et de la santé qui les côtoient au quotidien et leurs besoins pour y remédier

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See detailDynamic Career Attitudes : theoretical model and evaluation protocol
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

Monitoring and assessment of career attitudes are critical for the student’s preparation for an adapted university-to-work transition. Our study explored the relationships between the psycho-educational ... [more ▼]

Monitoring and assessment of career attitudes are critical for the student’s preparation for an adapted university-to-work transition. Our study explored the relationships between the psycho-educational and socio-demographic factors, and the perception of their dynamic career attitudes (DCA). DCA must be stimulated at the entry to university with appropriately collaborative supports, pedagogical workshops and interpersonal trainings. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-perceived academic employability skills and physical quality of life on first-year university students’ well-being
Baumann, Michèle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Amara, Marie-Emmanuelle UL

in Pracana, L.; Silva, L. (Eds.) INPACT - International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2013)

With the Bologna Process, students’ wellbeing and generic skills for employability became priorities for European universities, but their respective influences remain unclear. Our aims were to analyse the ... [more ▼]

With the Bologna Process, students’ wellbeing and generic skills for employability became priorities for European universities, but their respective influences remain unclear. Our aims were to analyse the relationships between Academic Employability Skills (AES), psychological suffering (General Health Questionnaire) and psychological quality of life (psychological Whoqol-bref) and other physical, social and environmental Whoqol-bref domains and socio-demographic characteristics. Design. Nine months after the start of their first-year at University of Luxembourg, 973 students were invited to participate at a cross-sectional study. Methods. An online questionnaire was proposed in French, German, and English to assess : a) two instruments described the student’s well-being : 1) Whoqol-bref's psychological subscale-6 items (Cronbach's alpha 0.77) with higher the score, higher the psychological quality of live; 2) GHQ-12 items scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.75) with lower the score, lower the psychological suffering; and one explored the AES-5 items scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.76) (capacities of drafting, solution problem, team work, supervision / direction of others, and use new technologies). . Data were analysed using logistic models. Findings. 321 first-year students participated in the study Psychological Whoqol-bref’s and AES’s scores are positively correlated. This relation was verified for each item (drafting, critical spirit, solution to problem, team work, and supervision/direction of others) except use new technologies. Between the correlations of the two instruments only 3/6 items of psychological Whoqol-bref (ability to concentrate, satisfaction with self, negative feelings) are correlated with 8/12 items of GHQ-12 (sleep lost, making decisions, feeling under strain, no overcome difficulties, depressed, loosing self-confidence, considering his/her self as a worthless, reasonably happy). A positive effect between the psychological Whoqol-bref and the AES scores was observed, including with physical, social relationships and environmental domains. No connection exists between the AES and the GHQ-12 scores; on the other side the GHQ-12 score has a negative influence on physical Whoqol-bref status. Conclusions. If a wellbeing suffering contributes in less physical quality of life, the better wellbeing, the higher academic employability skills. Campus should care of students ‘wellbeing and implement counselling activities and adapted environmental to improve their sustainable skills for employability. If the university could maintain the well-being indicators at appropriate levels or manage decreases as they occur, it would have implications for health promotion by creation of new student support systems and services developing sustainable conditions for better European Higher Educational Area. [less ▲]

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