References of "Karathanasi, Chrysoula 50002072"
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See detailFactors that contribute to work satisfaction of master students and graduates
Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Odero, Angela UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pracana, Clara; Wang, Michael (Eds.) International psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2016)

From employers to university managers, they all want their employees or students to be the most satisfied in their work or studies respectively. Our study aim was to analyze the associations between work ... [more ▼]

From employers to university managers, they all want their employees or students to be the most satisfied in their work or studies respectively. Our study aim was to analyze the associations between work satisfaction (WS) with psychosocial job-related factors, general and psychological quality of life, and socioeconomic characteristics. An online questionnaire was completed by Master students (N=66) and graduates (N=71). WS was assessed with a single item (1 to 10=very satisfied). Determinants of Postgraduates’ WS were: physical working conditions, recognition you get for good work, opportunity to use ones abilities as well as general and psychological quality of life. These results show that their entrance into the job market is recent and hasn’t yet allowed them to feel the reinforcement they are entitled to expect. Indeed, for Masters Students, the higher their WS was, the better the financial situation they declared was, and the higher the freedom to choose their own work methods and relationships with colleagues and fellow workers were. Whereas for graduates, it is the amount of responsibility they are given, which was higher. The perceptions of graduates’ WS in relation to their career attitudes and at different stages of their careers must be further explored with a longitudinal study. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat enhances the Life Satisfaction of postgraduates who studied in Luxembourg, in the EU or out-EU universities?
Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Odero, Angela UL; Karavdic, Senad et al

in Papanikos, Gregori. T. (Ed.) Education (2016)

Postgraduate students’ Life Satisfaction (LS) has been few explored, in a context where mobility towards universities abroad is increasing. In Luxembourg, more than half of students pursue their studies ... [more ▼]

Postgraduate students’ Life Satisfaction (LS) has been few explored, in a context where mobility towards universities abroad is increasing. In Luxembourg, more than half of students pursue their studies in a different country, and must be able to cope with this transition. Our research questions were (1) which factors are associated with students’ LS, according to their country of studies, and in relation to their mental health, career attitude and socioeconomic characteristics? and (2) which determinants contribute to a better LS for each group? For the years 2012 and 2013, all postgraduates who had obtained a financial aid from the Luxembourgish government were contacted by post to complete an online questionnaire. For the 492 respondents, the regression analysis showed that a higher health satisfaction leads to higher LS. Career optimism and planning were positively associated with LS for students in Luxembourg. Higher were autonomy and career adaptability, and lower was worry, better was the LS for those studying in EU. To enhance students’ LS, it is suggested a preparation for a successful mobility organized by the corresponding CEDIES of every country. Moreover, an accompaniment realized by the hosting university should be also proposed to students in mobility. [less ▲]

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See detailThe welcome and integration contract of Luxembourg: satisfaction with the quality of services according to non-EU immigrants
Odero, Angela UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pracana, Clara; Wang, Michael (Eds.) International psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2016)

Evaluating satisfaction with the quality of services is a central concern of social and educational programs, whose mission is to adhere as closely as possible to the needs of the population. Based on ... [more ▼]

Evaluating satisfaction with the quality of services is a central concern of social and educational programs, whose mission is to adhere as closely as possible to the needs of the population. Based on methodological and investigator triangulation methods, our aims were to analyze the level of satisfaction with the Welcome and Integration Contract of Luxembourg (Contract d’accueil et d’integation CAI) and its respective activities (citizenship courses, language courses and an orientation day). First, 233 out of 1084 Non-EU immigrant beneficiaries responded to a self-administrated questionnaire. Second, 11 semi-structured focus groups with 50 volunteers were conducted around four themes: Quality of activities, organization, availability of support personnel and utility of the information received. More than 72% of the participants were very satisfied with the quality, organisation and availability of personnel, in regard to the information session and the civic courses. Divergences exist because various needs were recognized. Potential activities to reduce the quality gap were proposed, for instance the creation of an interactive online platform where the beneficiaries could regularly get information and, exchange experiences and/or help each other whenever possible. The dynamism and interactivity in the focus groups revealed that the users would like to actively contribute to improving the process. Indeed, the needs and requirements of each immigrant group cannot be totally covered by these activities as they stand. Involving users in the strategy and action plans would help create more accurate solutions. [less ▲]

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See detailDisparities in Career Attitudes among Postgraduate Students
Karavdic, Senad UL; Odero, Angela UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL et al

in Pascana, Clara (Ed.) Psychology Applications & Developments II (2016)

The preparation of students’ future career trajectories is a dynamic process in relation with social and educational determinants. Our objective is to analyse the associations between generic employment ... [more ▼]

The preparation of students’ future career trajectories is a dynamic process in relation with social and educational determinants. Our objective is to analyse the associations between generic employment capabilities, career attitudes and related factors among postgraduate students. All masters’ students registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education (CEDIES) database in Luxembourg were contacted by post to participate in an online questionnaire. The five point scale questionnaire was scored as follows: 1) Dynamic Career Attitudes (DCA); 2) Employability Soft-Skills (ESS); 3) Search for Work Self-Efficacy (SWSES); 4) Quality of Life domain Autonomy (QLA); and 5) Socio-demographic characteristics. The data were analysed using bivariate tests, correlations and multiple linear regression models. 481 of the volunteers (26.4 years; SD=5.5) were predominantly women, Luxembourgish, unemployed and had less than or equal to six months of job experience. The higher the ESS, SWSES and QLA scores, the higher the DCA score was. Nationality, being unemployed, having less than six months job experience and being in the first year of a Master’s degree programme were associated with a lower dynamic career attitude score. The Dynamic Career Attitudes scale seems to be an appropriate instrument to evaluate the efficacy of the university career services programme. [less ▲]

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See detailLife Satisfaction between Non-Luxembourgish and Native Luxembourgish Postgraduate Students
Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Sociology Migration and Integration (2015)

Life satisfaction (LS) is a potential key to social progress and contributes to the functioning of individuals. In Luxembourg, the postgraduates who receive financial aid from the government are ... [more ▼]

Life satisfaction (LS) is a potential key to social progress and contributes to the functioning of individuals. In Luxembourg, the postgraduates who receive financial aid from the government are registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education. In order to obtain the financial aid, one of the criteria dictates that one of the parents of foreign students should have been working in Luxembourg for at least 5 years. In this country, which is built on migration (46% of the resident population consists of foreigners), is the basis on which our scientific questions are raised: (1) between non-Luxembourgish and native Luxembourgish students is the LS different? (2) What respective relationships exist with mental health-related factors, career attributes, socio-economic characteristics, and LS? (3) What are their associations of mental health (health satisfaction, psychological quality of life, worry), perception of financial situation and career attributes (adaptability, optimism, knowledge, planning) on LS? Between 2012 and 2013, 644 postgraduates were contacted by post to complete an online questionnaire in English or French. Foreign postgraduates who are settled in Luxembourg (born in Luxembourg and did not have the Luxembourgish citizenship, N=147) and native students (born in Luxembourg and had the nationality, N=284), were compared. Postgraduates who were born in Luxembourg but did not have the citizenship or were not born in Luxembourg and had the Luxembourgish citizenship were excluded. A single item measured LS (1 = not at all satisfied to 10 = very satisfied) same as in the European quality of life survey. Bivariate tests, correlations and multiple linear models were used, in which only significant relationships (p< 0.05) were integrated. Between the two groups, no differences exist between LS’ indicators (7.8/10 non-Luxembourgish; 8.0/10 natives), both of which is higher than the European indicator 7.2/10 (for 25-34 years). However, non-Luxembourgish students are older than natives are (29.3 years vs. 26.3 years), perceive their financial situation as more difficult, and a higher percentage of their parents have an education level higher than a Bachelor's degree (father 59.2% vs 44.6% for natives; mother 51.4% vs 33.7% for natives). In addition, father’s education is related to postgraduates’ LS and the higher is their level, the greater is their contribution to LS. Whereas for the native students, the better their health satisfaction, and career optimism is, the higher their LS are. For the both group, mental health-related factors, perception of their financial situation, career optimism, adaptability, and planning are linked to LS. The higher their psychological quality of life is, the better is their LS. Good health and favourable attitudes related to the job market enhance their LS. [less ▲]

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See detailThe integration process of Non-EU citizens in Luxembourg From an empirical approach towards a theoretical model
Odero, Angela UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in International Journal of Social Welfare (2015), 9(11), 3868-3875

Integration of foreign communities has been a forefront issue in Luxembourg for some time now. The country’s continued progress depends largely on the successful integration of immigrants. The aim of our ... [more ▼]

Integration of foreign communities has been a forefront issue in Luxembourg for some time now. The country’s continued progress depends largely on the successful integration of immigrants. The aim of our study was to analyze factors which intervene in the course of integration of Non-EU citizens through the discourse of Non-EU citizens residing in Luxembourg, who have signed the Welcome and Integration Contract (CAI). The two year contract, offers integration services to assist foreigners in getting settled in the country. Semi-structured focus group discussions with 50 volunteers were held in English, French, Spanish, Serbo-Croatian or Chinese. Participants were asked to talk about their integration experiences. Recorded then transcribed, the transcriptions were analyzed with the help of NVivo 10, a qualitative analysis software. A systematic and reiterative analysis of decomposing and reconstituting was realized through (1). The identification of predetermined categories (difficulties, challenges and integration needs) (2). Initial coding – the grouping together of similar ideas (3). Axial coding – the regrouping of items from the initial coding in new ways in order to create sub-categories and identify other core dimensions. Our results show that intervening factors include language acquisition, professional career and socio-cultural activities or events. Each of these factors constitutes different components, whose weight shifts from person to person and from situation to situation. Connecting these three emergent factors are two elements essential to the success of the immigrant’s integration – the role of time and deliberate effort from the immigrants, the community and the formal institutions charged with helping immigrants integrate. We propose a theoretical model where the factors described may be classified in terms of how they predispose, facilitate and / or reinforce the process towards a successful integration. Measures currently in place propose one size fits all programs, yet integrative measures which target to the family unit and those customized to target groups based on their needs would work best. [less ▲]

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See detailLife Satisfaction of Non-Luxembourgish and Native Luxembourgish Postgraduate Students
Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Senad, Karavdic; Odero, Angela UL et al

in International Journal of Social Welfare (2015), 9(11), 3852-3857

It is not only the economic determinants that impact on life conditions, but maintaining a good level of life satisfaction (LS) may also be an important challenge currently. In Luxembourg, university ... [more ▼]

It is not only the economic determinants that impact on life conditions, but maintaining a good level of life satisfaction (LS) may also be an important challenge currently. In Luxembourg, university students receive financial aid from the government. They are then registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education (CEDIES). Luxembourg is built on migration with almost half its population consisting of foreigners. It is upon this basis that our research aims to analyze the associations with mental health factors (health satisfaction, psychological quality of life, worry), perceived financial situation, career attitudes (adaptability, optimism, knowledge, planning) and LS, for non-Luxembourgish and native postgraduate students. Between 2012 and 2013, postgraduates registered at CEDIES were contacted by post and asked to participate in an online survey with either the option of English or French. The study population comprised of 644 respondents. Our statistical analysis excluded: those born abroad who had Luxembourgish citizenship, or those born in Luxembourg who did not have citizenship. Two groups were formed one consisting 147 non-Luxembourgish and the other 284 natives. A single item measured LS (1=not at all satisfied to 10=very satisfied). Bivariate tests, correlations and multiple linear regression models were used in which only significant relationships (p<0.05) were integrated. Among the two groups no differences were found between LS indicators (7.8/10 non-Luxembourgish; 8.0/10 natives) as both were higher than the European indicator of 7.2/10 (for 25-34 years). In the case of non-Luxembourgish students, they were older than natives (29.3 years vs. 26.3 years) perceived their financial situation as more difficult, and a higher percentage of their parents had an education level higher than a Bachelor's degree (father 59.2% vs 44.6% for natives; mother 51.4% vs 33.7% for natives). In addition, the father’s education was related to the LS of postgraduates and the higher was the score, the greater was the contribution to LS. Whereas for native students, when their scores of health satisfaction and career optimism were higher, their LS’ score was higher. For both groups their LS was linked to mental health-related factors, perception of their financial situation, career optimism, adaptability and planning. The higher the psychological quality of life score was, the greater the LS of postgraduates’ was. Good health and positive attitudes related to the job market enhanced their LS indicator. [less ▲]

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See detailNeeds the Integration Contract Services of Luxembourg Should Cover, for the Successful Integration of Non-EU Citizens
Odero, Angela UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Migration and Integration (2015)

Integration of the foreign communities has been a forefront issue in Luxembourg for some time now. With a population of approximately 563,000, Luxembourg is a kaleidoscopic of cultures, comprising over ... [more ▼]

Integration of the foreign communities has been a forefront issue in Luxembourg for some time now. With a population of approximately 563,000, Luxembourg is a kaleidoscopic of cultures, comprising over 170 nationalities. The country’s continued progress depends largely on the successful assimilation of immigrants. To better understand what constitutes the best integration, the European Investment Fund for Non-EU nationals, together with the Welcome and Integration office of Luxembourg, funded this project. The aim of our study was to explore the definition of the integration according to Non-EU citizens residing in Luxembourg, and to evaluate the services of the integration contract of Luxembourg (CAI) which should cover their needs. Eleven focus group discussions with 50 volunteers (32 women, 18 men) recruited from among 233 Non-EU beneficiaries of the CAI were held. Semi-structured discussions (4 to 8 people) were facilitated in English, French, Spanish, Serbo-Croatian or Chinese and lasted between 1.5 to 2.5 hours. Encouraged, they delved into detailed explanations of the difficulties and challenges they face, their expectations upon arrival; considering the multicultural nature of Luxembourg, the differences between these expectations and the reality, their needs, both met and unmet, and their perceptions. To grasp the requirements covered or not covered by the CAI, and the problems faced by Non-EU citizens, eight questions exploring the contract were posed. To direct these discussions were four main guidelines: (1) The quality of services and activities proposed, (2) the organization (3) the availability of the personnel and (4) the utility of the information received. Transcriptions were analysed with the help of NVivo 10. A systematic and reiterative analysis of decomposing and reconstituting the data was conducted following three main steps. (1). Identification in the transcriptions were read in order to identify potential answers to the aims of the research and main categories (difficulties, challenges and integration needs). These informed subsequent analyses (2). Similar verbatim regrouped in category and an item was formular. (3). Categories were regrouped together in dimension. Three dimensions were identified professional career, linguistic acquisitionand socio-cultural activities or events which are two core elements essential to the success of the immigrant’s integration – recognition of the role of time in the process, and deliberate effort on the part of the immigrants, the society around and the formal institutions charged with the responsibility of helping with integration. Further, there was a majority consensus on good quality of services in at least one of the components of CAI, and on the availability of the personnel. The organisation and content utility was suitable for some, but maladapted to the needs of others, since they did not address their current concerns. The one fits all structure of the CAI, would need revision through considering smaller groups with specific needs separately. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents’ Well-being: Impacts of studying out-EU and perceived autonomy on the Psychological Quality of Life
Bucki, Barbara UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL et al

in European Health Psychologist (The) (2015), special

Introduction: With an increasing number of university students in preparation of their entrance in the labor market, the wellbeing of the postgraduates became a priority for many universities. Despite ... [more ▼]

Introduction: With an increasing number of university students in preparation of their entrance in the labor market, the wellbeing of the postgraduates became a priority for many universities. Despite numerous studies on this topic, respective relationships of wellbeing and other psychosocial factors still remain unclear. Aims: (1) to assess Psychological Quality of Life of postgraduates who study in Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (GDL), EU and non – EU countries; (2) to analyze its associations with their socio-economic,health and employability related cofactors. Method: All masters’ students registered at the Centre for Documentation and Information on Higher Education (CEDIES) database in GDL were contacted by mail to participate at an online questionnaire (in English or French) measuring: 1. Psychological Whoqol-bref (6 items) (dependent variable) 2. Wellbeing attributes: Quality of Life Autonomy, Health Satisfaction, and Penn state worry questionnaire (Worries). 3. Employability attributes: Search for Work Self Efficacy scale (SWSES), Career Goals setting. 4. Perceived financial situation and socio-demographic characteristics. Respondents who did not mention the country of their studies were excluded from the analysis. Bivariate tests and correlations were performed for association analyses between the variables. Only significant relationships (p<0.05) were used in the multiple linear model. Results: 490 participants were volunteers from which 13.5% study in Luxembourg, 77.8% in an EU country and 8.7% in a non EU country. Majority were women, with exception for those studying in non-EU countries who were mainly men. Participants studying in GDL were older than those studying abroad. Natives of Luxembourg were prevalent with higher percentages among those who study in a non EU-country. Those studying in non-EU showed significantly (p<0.05) higher Psychological Quality of Life (M=76.8; SD=12.8) than those in GDL (M=74.5;SD=12.6) respectively in EU (M=71.4; SD=15.3). While participants differ in their QoL-Autonomy score there isn’t any significant difference in their career goals setting, Search for work self efficacy, Health satisfaction, Worries and Perceived financial situation across the country of study.Conclusion: Better psychological quality of life mobilized the capability of students to study abroad, which is related to better wellbeing attributes. However this relationship remains true only for students studying in Non-EU countries. Implementing workshops to increase individual self-efficacy towards a future employment may improve and/or maintain wellbeing of academics and limit so, respective social inequalities. [less ▲]

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