References of "Jungmann, Manuela 50002060"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUndesirable Consequences and Social Contexts of Technology Use: A Micro-analysis of Embodied User Interaction
Jungmann, Manuela UL; Cox, Richard

in Interacting with Computers (2017), 29(4), 481493

The focus of this paper is on the unexpected and undesirable consequences of social interaction with technological innovations, which we analyse with the support of two frameworks to better comprehend ... [more ▼]

The focus of this paper is on the unexpected and undesirable consequences of social interaction with technological innovations, which we analyse with the support of two frameworks to better comprehend their social implications. The first, techno-social framework, consists of Allenby and Sarewitz's taxonomy of technological social function. In the second, cognitive, framework, we introduce concepts from dual-systems theory. The frameworks provide a lens through which to view techno-cultural examples. This sets the stage for our case study in which we investigate an interactive game installation. Using data analytics, we uncover hidden effects due to the social interactions between the players and to their physical attributes. We conclude that there is a pressing need for innovators to broaden the scope of their evaluations to not just evaluate innovative technologies at the initial engineering/design phase but also to conduct evaluations at later phases of adoption and appropriation that focus on social contexts-of-use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 UL)
See detailDesigning for Embodied Interaction: Perceptual Motor Effects as Unintended Consequences
Jungmann, Manuela UL

Presentation (2015, December)

When designing for embodied interactions, the convergence of spatial human behaviour with physical space is often not sufficiently considered. This can cause unintended consequences in the user experience ... [more ▼]

When designing for embodied interactions, the convergence of spatial human behaviour with physical space is often not sufficiently considered. This can cause unintended consequences in the user experience, whereby the user may or may not be aware of the effects. In this talk I will discuss a study that was conducted into the spatial player behaviour of a multiplayer game installation. The installation’s interface was designed for embodied interaction and required whole body movements to play the game. The spatial analysis investigated a range of players’ activities in the game-space which revealed synergistic effects combining perceptual-motor factors with game-strategy behaviour. As games are becoming increasingly embodied and social the study’s findings illustrate that the role of space should receive more attention which may also require for designers to incorporate new methodologies into the design process. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpatial play effects in a tangible game with an f-formation of multiple players
Jungmann, Manuela UL; Cox, Richard; Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

in Proceedings of the Fifteenth Australasian User Interface Conference (2014, January), 150

Drawing on Kendon's F-formation framework of social interaction, we analysed the game-space activity of collocated players engaged in a tangible multiplayer game. Game input from groups of 3 players ... [more ▼]

Drawing on Kendon's F-formation framework of social interaction, we analysed the game-space activity of collocated players engaged in a tangible multiplayer game. Game input from groups of 3 players interacting competitively in a natural spatial arrangement via balance-boards requiring whole-body movements was logged and analysed quantitatively. The spatial analysis of a range of players' activities in game-space revealed synergistic effects combining perceptual-motor factors with game-strategy behaviour which were reflected in preferred game-board playing regions. The findings illustrate the importance for HCI designers of considering interactions between human spatial behaviour, physical space and virtual game-space as games become increasingly embodied and social. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (3 UL)