References of "Johnston, James A"
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See detailMechanisms of SOCS3 phosphorylation upon interleukin-6 stimulation. Contributions of Src- and receptor-tyrosine kinases.
Sommer, Ulrike; Schmid, Christine; Sobota, Radoslaw M. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2005), 280(36), 31478-88

The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are negative feedback inhibitors of cytokine signal transduction. SOCS3 is a key negative regulator of interleuking-6 (IL-6) signal transduction. Furthermore ... [more ▼]

The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are negative feedback inhibitors of cytokine signal transduction. SOCS3 is a key negative regulator of interleuking-6 (IL-6) signal transduction. Furthermore, SOCS3 was shown to be phosphorylated upon treatment of cells with IL-2, and this has been reported to regulate its function and half-life. We set out to investigate whether SOCS3 phosphorylation may play a role in IL-6 signaling. Tyrosine-phosphorylated SOCS3 was detected upon treatment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with IL-6. Interestingly, the observed SOCS3 phosphorylation does not require SOCS3 recruitment to phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) 759 of gp130, and the kinetics of SOCS3 phosphorylation do not match the activation kinetics of the Janus kinases. This suggests that other kinases may be involved in SOCS3 phosphorylation. Using Src and Janus kinase inhibitors as well as Src kinase-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we provide evidence that Src kinases, which we found to be constitutively active in these cells, are involved in the phosphorylation of IL-6-induced SOCS3. In addition, we found that receptor-tyrosine kinases such as platelet-derived growth factor receptor or epidermal growth factor receptor can very potently phosphorylate IL-6-induced SOCS3. Taken together, these results suggest that SOCS3 phosphorylation is not a JAK-mediated phenomenon but is dependent on the activity of other kinases such as Src kinases or receptor-tyrosine kinases, which can either be constitutively active or activated by an additional stimulus. [less ▲]

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See detailThe chemoattractants, IL-8 and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, regulate granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling by inducing suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 expression.
Stevenson, Nigel J.; Haan, Serge UL; McClurg, Angela E. et al

in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) (2004), 173(5), 3243-9

Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are encoded by immediate early genes known to inhibit cytokine responses in a classical feedback loop. SOCS gene expression has been shown to be induced by many ... [more ▼]

Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are encoded by immediate early genes known to inhibit cytokine responses in a classical feedback loop. SOCS gene expression has been shown to be induced by many cytokines, growth factors, and innate immune stimuli, such as LPS. In this paper, we report that the chemoattractants, IL-8 and fMLP, up-regulate SOCS1 mRNA in human myeloid cells, primary human neutrophils, PBMCs, and dendritic cells. fMLP rapidly up-regulates SOCS1, whereas the induction of SOCS1 upon IL-8 treatment is delayed. IL-8 and fMLP did not signal via Jak/STATs in primary human macrophages, thus implicating the induction of SOCS by other intracellular pathways. As chemoattractant-induced SOCS1 expression in neutrophils may play an important role in regulating the subsequent response to growth promoting cytokines like G-CSF, we investigated the effect of chemoattractant-induced SOCS1 on cytokine signal transduction. We show that pretreatment of primary human neutrophils with fMLP or IL-8 blocks G-CSF-mediated STAT3 activation. This study provides evidence for cross-talk between chemoattractant and cytokine signal transduction pathways involving SOCS proteins, suggesting that these chemotactic factors may desensitize neutrophils to G-CSF via rapid induction of SOCS1 expression. [less ▲]

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See detailTyrosine phosphorylation disrupts elongin interaction and accelerates SOCS3 degradation.
Haan, Serge UL; Ferguson, Paul; Sommer, Ulrike et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(34), 31972-9

The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are negative feedback inhibitors of cytokine and growth factor-induced signal transduction. The C-terminal SOCS box region is thought to regulate SOCS protein ... [more ▼]

The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are negative feedback inhibitors of cytokine and growth factor-induced signal transduction. The C-terminal SOCS box region is thought to regulate SOCS protein stability most likely via an elongin C interaction. In the present study, we have found that phosphorylation of SOCS3 at two tyrosine residues in the conserved SOCS box, Tyr204 and Tyr221, can inhibit the SOCS3-elongin C interaction and activate proteasome-mediated SOCS3 degradation. Jak-mediated phosphorylation of SOCS3 decreased SOCS3 protein half-life, and phosphorylation of both Tyr204 and Tyr221 was required to fully destabilize SOCS3. In contrast, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of SOCS3, Y204F,Y221F, remained stable in the presence of activated Jak2 and receptor tyrosine kinases. SOCS3 stability correlated with the relative amount that bound elongin C, because in vitro phosphorylation of a SOCS3-glutathione S-transferase fusion protein abolished its ability to interact with elongin C. In addition, a SOCS3/SOCS1 chimera that co-precipitates with markedly increased elongin C, was significantly more stable than wild-type SOCS3. The data suggest that interaction with elongin C stabilizes SOCS3 protein expression and that phosphorylation of SOCS box tyrosine residues disrupts the complex and enhances proteasome-mediated degradation of SOCS3. [less ▲]

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See detailSuppressor of cytokine signaling-3 is recruited to the activated granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor and modulates its signal transduction.
Hortner, Michael; Nielsch, Ulrich; Mayr, Lorenz M. et al

in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) (2002), 169(3), 1219-27

G-CSF is a polypeptide growth factor used in treatment following chemotherapy. G-CSF regulates granulopoiesis and acts on its target cells by inducing homodimerization of the G-CSFR, thereby activating ... [more ▼]

G-CSF is a polypeptide growth factor used in treatment following chemotherapy. G-CSF regulates granulopoiesis and acts on its target cells by inducing homodimerization of the G-CSFR, thereby activating intracellular signaling cascades. The G-CSFR encompasses four tyrosine motifs on its cytoplasmic tail that have been shown to recruit a number of regulatory proteins. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3), also referred to as cytokine-inducible Src homolgy 2-containing protein 3, is a member of a recently discovered family of feedback inhibitors that have been shown to inhibit the Janus kinase/STAT pathway. In this study, we demonstrate that human SOCS-3 is rapidly induced by G-CSF in polymorphonuclear neutrophils as well as in the myeloid precursor cell line U937 and that SOCS-3 negatively regulates G-CSFR-mediated STAT activation. Most importantly, we show that SOCS-3 is recruited to the G-CSFR in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and we identify phosphotyrosine (pY)729 as the major recruitment site for SOCS-3. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SOCS-3 directly binds to this pY motif. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals a dissociation constant (K(D)) for this interaction of around 2.8 microM. These findings strongly suggest that the recruitment of SOCS-3 to pY729 is important for the modulation of G-CSFR-mediated signal transduction by SOCS-3. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (2 UL)