References of "Jarosz-Chobot, P"
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See detailSeasonal variation in month of diagnosis in children with type 1 diabetes registered in 23 European centers during 1989-2008: little short-term influence of sunshine hours or average temperature
Patterson, C.; Gyürüs, E.; Rosenbauer, J. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2015), 16(8), 573-580

BACKGROUND: The month of diagnosis in childhood type 1 diabetes shows seasonal variation. OBJECTIVE: We describe the pattern and investigate if year-to-year irregularities are associated with ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The month of diagnosis in childhood type 1 diabetes shows seasonal variation. OBJECTIVE: We describe the pattern and investigate if year-to-year irregularities are associated with meteorological factors using data from 50 000 children diagnosed under the age of 15 yr in 23 population-based European registries during 1989-2008. METHODS: Tests for seasonal variation in monthly counts aggregated over the 20 yr period were performed. Time series regression was used to investigate if sunshine hour and average temperature data were predictive of the 240 monthly diagnosis counts after taking account of seasonality and long term trends. RESULTS: Significant sinusoidal pattern was evident in all but two small centers with peaks in November to February and relative amplitudes ranging from ± 11 to ± 38% (median ± 17%). However, most centers showed significant departures from a sinusoidal pattern. Pooling results over centers, there was significant seasonal variation in each age-group at diagnosis, with least seasonal variation in those under 5 yr. Boys showed greater seasonal variation than girls, particularly those aged 10-14 yr. There were no differences in seasonal pattern between four 5-yr sub-periods. Departures from the sinusoidal trend in monthly diagnoses in the period were significantly associated with deviations from the norm in average temperature (0.8% reduction in diagnoses per 1 °C excess) but not with sunshine hours. CONCLUSIONS: Seasonality was consistently apparent throughout the period in all age-groups and both sexes, but girls and the under 5 s showed less marked variation. Neither sunshine hour nor average temperature data contributed in any substantial way to explaining departures from the sinusoidal pattern. [less ▲]

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See detailClassifying insulin regimens--difficulties and proposal for comprehensive new definitions.
Neu, A.; Lange, K.; Barrett, T. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2015), 16(6), 402-406

Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied ... [more ▼]

Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied. Despite clear recommendations for insulin management in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes there is little distinctiveness about concepts and the nomenclature is confusing. Even among experts similar terms are used for different strategies. The aim of our review--based on the experiences of the Hvidoere Study Group (HSG)--is to propose comprehensive definitions for current insulin regimens reflecting current diabetes management in childhood and adolescence. The HSG--founded in 1994--is an international group representing 24 highly experienced pediatric diabetes centers, from Europe, Japan, North America and Australia. Different benchmarking studies of the HSG revealed a broad variety of insulin regimens applied in each center, respectively. Furthermore, the understanding of insulin regimens has been persistently different between the centers since more than 20 yr. Not even the terms 'conventional' and 'intensified therapy' were used consistently among all members. Besides the concepts 'conventional' and 'intensified', several other terms for the characterization of insulin regimens are in use: Basal Bolus Concept (BBC), multiple daily injections (MDI), and flexible insulin therapy (FIT) are most frequently used, although none of these expressions is clearly or consistently defined. The proposed new classification for insulin management will be comprehensive, simple, and catchy. Currently available terms were included. This classification may offer the opportunity to compare therapeutic strategies without the currently existing confusion on the insulin regimen. [less ▲]

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See detailLessons from the Hvidoere International Study Group on childhood diabetes: Be dogmatic about outcome and flexible in approach
Cameron, F. J.; De Beaufort, Carine UL; Aanstoot, H.-J. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2013), 14(7), 473-480

[No abstract available]

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See detailCross-border flow of health information: is 'privacy by design' enough? Privacy performance assessment in EUBIROD
Di Iorio, C.T.; Carinci, F.; Brillante, M. et al

in European Journal of Public Health (2013), 23(2), 247-253

Background: The EUBIROD project aims to perform a cross-border flow of diabetes information across 19 European countries using the BIRO information system, which embeds privacy principles and data ... [more ▼]

Background: The EUBIROD project aims to perform a cross-border flow of diabetes information across 19 European countries using the BIRO information system, which embeds privacy principles and data protection mechanisms in its architecture (privacy by design). A specific task of EUBIROD was to investigate the variability in the implementation of the EU Data Protection Directive (DPD) across participating centres. Methods: Compliance with privacy requirements was assessed by means of a specific questionnaire administered to all participating diabetes registers. Items included relevant issues e.g. patient consent, accountability of data custodian, communication (openness) and complaint procedures (challenging compliance), authority to disclose, accuracy, access and use of personal information, and anonymization. The identification of an ad hoc scoring system and statistical software allowed an overall quali-quantitative analysis and independent evaluation of questionnaire responses, automated through a dedicated IT platform (‘privacy performance assessment’). Results: A total of 18 diabetes registers from different countries completed the survey. Over 50% of the registers recorded a maximum score for accountability, openness, anonymization and challenging compliance. Low average values were found for disclosure and disposition, access, consent, use of personal information and accuracy. A high heterogeneity was found for anonymization, consent, accuracy and access. Conclusions: The novel method of privacy performance assessment realized in EUBIROD may improve the respect of privacy in each data source, reduce overall variability in the implementation of privacy principles and favour a sound and legitimate cross-border exchange of high quality data across Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of continuous glucose monitoring in children and adolescents
Phillip, M.; Danne, T.; Shalitin, S. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2012), 13(3), 215-228

[No abstract available]

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See detailBirth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: A pooled analysis of 31 observational studies
Cardwell, C. R.; Stene, L. C.; Joner, G. et al

in International Journal of Epidemiology (2011), 40(2), 363-374

Background: The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether ... [more ▼]

Background: The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies. Methods: Relevant studies published before January 2010 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. Authors of studies provided individual patient data or conducted pre-specified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios (ORs), before and after adjustment for confounders, and investigate heterogeneity. Results: Data were available for 6 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 11 955 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was no evidence of an association prior to adjustment for confounders. After adjustment for maternal age at birth and other confounders, a reduction in the risk of diabetes in second-or later born children became apparent [fully adjusted OR=0.90 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.98; P=0.02] but this association varied markedly between studies (I2=67%). An a priori subgroup analysis showed that the association was stronger and more consistent in children <5years of age (n=25 studies, maternal age adjusted OR=0.84 95% CI 0.75, 0.93; I2=23%). Conclusion: Although the association varied between studies, there was some evidence of a lower risk of childhood onset type 1 diabetes with increasing birth order, particularly in children aged <5 years. This finding could reflect increased exposure to infections in early life in later born children. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2010; all rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailTransition from pediatric to adult diabetes care: Smooth or slippery?
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Jarosz-Chobot, P.; Frank, M. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2010), 11(1), 24-27

de Beaufort C, Jarosz-Chobot P, Frank M, Frank M, de Bart J, Deja G. Transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care: smooth or slippery?Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the practices ... [more ▼]

de Beaufort C, Jarosz-Chobot P, Frank M, Frank M, de Bart J, Deja G. Transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care: smooth or slippery?Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the practices of diabetes health care providers concerning the transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care. The information presented here may help increase awareness of the organization of transitional care for young people with diabetes and prevent the loss of follow-up during this vulnerable period in their lives.Methods: A questionnaire with an explanatory letter was sent to all members (n = 578) of the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD). A follow-up mailing was sent 4 months later.Results: In total, 92 questionnaires (16%) from members representing 36 countries were included in the analysis. In 76% of the centers, youth are seen until the age of 18 yr; 36% of the pediatric centers see adults > 25 yr; 30% report children under the age of 16 receive follow up from adult diabetologists or internists. About half of the programs already have a structured transition process usually targeting youth 16-25 yr of age. The majority of responders propose that preparation for transition starts at least 1 yr prior to leaving the pediatric center.Conclusion: Youth with type 1 diabetes often struggle to keep diabetes management a priority and find it challenging to maintain optimal metabolic control. When they graduate from pediatric care, some of these young people opt out of care altogether, only to resurface in the medical system when they develop complications which may have been prevented. Our survey of diabetes health care professionals in 36 countries worldwide shows that the actual transition practices in many places are far from optimal and require improvement. Transitional care should start early and strategies should promote uninterrupted, comprehensive, and accessible adult care. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S. [less ▲]

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