References of "Hilker, Rudiger"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAdvanced stages of PD: interventional therapies and related patient-centered care
Krüger, Rejko UL; Hilker, Rudiger; Winkler, Christian et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2016)

During the last decades, symptomatic treatment of motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) improved continuously and is reflected by long-range independency of the patient during the disease course ... [more ▼]

During the last decades, symptomatic treatment of motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) improved continuously and is reflected by long-range independency of the patient during the disease course. However, advanced stages of PD still represent an important challenge to patients, caregivers and treating physicians. In patients with advanced PD, interventional therapy strategies are increasingly applied. These device-related treatment strategies using pump-based continuous dopaminergic stimulation (CDS) or deep brain stimulation (DBS) opened new treatment options especially if motor complications predominate. Well-designed clinical studies on these interventional therapeutic approaches provided class 1 evidence for the efficacy of DBS and CDS in advanced PD and opened new perspectives for their use in earlier disease stages also. Therefore, careful selection of patients amenable to the (semi)invasive therapy options becomes more and more important and requires an interdisciplinary setting that accounts for (i) optimal patient information and awareness, (ii) selection of best individual treatment modality, (iii) training of relatives and caregivers, (iv) management of complications, and (v) follow-up care. Here, we address these topics by summarizing current state-of-the-art in patient selection, providing specificities of treatment options and troubleshooting, and defining steps towards an optimized patient-centered care. Interventional therapies pioneer in the area of individualized treatment approaches for PD, and may be complemented in the future by biomarker-based improved stratification and by closed-loop systems for adaptive therapeutic strategies. In the present review, we summarize the proceedings of an Expert Workshop on Parkinson's disease held on November 22, 2014 in Frankfurt, Germany. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 147 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical spectrum of homozygous and heterozygous PINK1 mutations in a large German family with Parkinson disease: role of a single hit?
Hedrich, Katja; Hagenah, Johann; Djarmati, Ana et al

in Archives of neurology (2006), 63(6), 833-8

BACKGROUND: Although homozygous mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene have been unequivocally associated with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), the role of single heterozygous ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although homozygous mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene have been unequivocally associated with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), the role of single heterozygous PINK1 mutations is less clear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of homozygous and heterozygous PINK1 mutations in a large German pedigree (family W). DESIGN: Mutation analysis of PINK1 and results of standardized neurological and motor examination by 3 independent movement disorder specialists, including blinded video rating. SETTINGS: University of Lubeck. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty family members. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The PINK1 genotype and PD status of all family members. RESULTS: The index patient of family W carried a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1366C>T; p.Q456X) and presented with a phenotype closely resembling idiopathic PD but with an onset at 39 years of age. The family included a total of 4 affected homozygous members (age, 60-71 years; age at onset, 39-61 years), 6 members with slight or mild signs of PD (affected) and a heterozygous mutation (age, 31-49 years), and 5 unaffected heterozygous mutation carriers (age, 34-44 years). Although none of the heterozygous affected family members was aware of their signs (asymptomatic), the clinical findings were unequivocal and predominantly or exclusively present on their dominant right-hand side, eg, unilaterally reduced or absent arm swing and unilateral rigidity. The heterozygous members were all considerably younger than the affected homozygous mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Heterozygous PINK1 mutations may predispose to PD, as was previously suggested by the presence of dopamine hypometabolism in asymptomatic mutation carriers. Long-term follow-up of our large family W provides an excellent opportunity to further evaluate the role of single heterozygous PINK1 mutations later in life, which will have major implications on genetic counseling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (4 UL)