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See detailPresent-Day Land and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island: Results from Precise Levelling, GNSS, Tide Gauge and Satellite Altimetry Measurements
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Dalziel, I W D; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 25)

South Georgia Island, the main land outcrop on the South Georgia microcontinent (SGM), is located approximately 1,400 km east of the Falkland Islands and approximately 1,400 km northeast of the ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island, the main land outcrop on the South Georgia microcontinent (SGM), is located approximately 1,400 km east of the Falkland Islands and approximately 1,400 km northeast of the northernmost tip of the Antarctic peninsular. The SGM is believed to lie south of the North Scotia Ridge (NSR), which forms the boundary to the South America Plate, while to the south it is bordered by the Scotia Plate (SP). In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by mountain glaciers which have been reported to be retreating due to climatic change. Furthermore, during past glaciation periods the island and its shelf area, stretching much of the SGM, have been ice covered as was revealed by scarring of the sub-oceanic topography. Together with ongoing tectonics along the NSR and recent seismicity at the SP boundary, these processes have the ability to produce significant uplift on local to regional scales. With its mid-ocean location in the Southern Atlantic Ocean South Georgia Island is in a key position for the oceanic and geodetic global monitoring networks. As these net-works suffer from a Hemisphere imbalance with the number of stations in the Northern Hemisphere outnumbering those in the Southern Hemisphere, operating these stations to the highest standards is of key scientific value. It is of particular interest to monitor the tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) at King Edward Point (KEP) for vertical land movements to establish a continuous record of its datum within the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), which in turn makes it useful for long-term sea level studies and satellite altimetry calibrations. With the establishment of five GNSS stations on the islands by teams from Luxembourg, the UK and the USA during 2013 to 2015, and the scientific analysis of these data within a global network of stations, it has now become possible to study present-day vertical land movements and their impacts. Furthermore, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, i.e. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the still preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding, leading to a lower magnitude of the observed sea level change than expected from satellite altimetry. In order to improve the agreement between these measurements both local and regional vertical land movements need to be monitored. [less ▲]

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See detailRecent Activities on Tristan da Cunha Island: Geodetic Installations, Local Tie Measurements and their Analysis
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Backes, Dietmar UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 11)

During 2017 a team from the University of Luxembourg and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, established a permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station and two new tide gauges on ... [more ▼]

During 2017 a team from the University of Luxembourg and the National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, established a permanent Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station and two new tide gauges on Tristan da Cunha Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. These installations were funded through various projects at both collaborating institutions under the umbrella of the International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group and the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) focus area on Sea Level Change, Variability and Forecasting. While this was the first scientific installation of a GNSS station on the main island within the Tristan da Cunha archipelago, IGS station GOUG, located on Gough Island which lies 412 km to the south, has been in operation since 1998. Unfortunately GOUG was decommissioned in 2018. Sea level observations on Tristan da Cunha have a longer history than GNSS with various tide gauges having been in operation since 1984. Tristan da Cunha also hosts a Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) station which was established in 2012 after a previous installation was upgraded and moved to the current site. The antenna TCTA is located on the concrete monument of the previous DORIS antenna. Furthermore, in order for future International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) computations to fully benefit from the proximity of the sensors, the geodetic ties between the respective antennas (and reference markers in case of the tide gauges) need to be determined at the millimeter level using various terrestrial surveying methods and a local benchmark network. This contribution provides details of the activities on Tristan da Cunha including the installations, the established benchmark network, the terrestrial surveys of the geodetic ties and the analysis of these measurements in order to geometrically link the GNSS and DORIS antennas to each other as well as to the tide gauges. [less ▲]

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See detailVertical Land Movements and Sea Level Changes around South Georgia Island
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Abraha, Kibrom Ebuy UL et al

Poster (2018, April 09)

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean is a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean is a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. In its sub-Antarctic location, the island is largely covered by mountain glaciers which have been reported to be retreating due to climatic change. Furthermore, during past glaciation periods the island and its shelf area have been ice covered as was revealed by scarring of the sub-oceanic topography. Together with ongoing tectonics along the North Scotia Ridge, these processes have the ability to produce significant uplift on local to regional scales, affecting the measurements of the tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) at King Edward Point (KEP). Furthermore, with its mid-ocean location, the tide gauge is of particular interest to satellite altimetry calibrations over the Southern Atlantic and Southern Oceans. With the establishment of five GNSS stations on the islands during 2013 to 2015 and the scientific analysis of these data within the global network of stations of the International GNSS Service Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) working group, it has now become possible to study present-day vertical land movements of the region and their impacts on, for example, regional sea level. Furthermore, together with four precise levelling campaigns of the KEP benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions near KEP, ie. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. In this study, we will present the still preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding, leading to a disagreement in the observed sea level change from the tide gauge and satellite altimetry. In order to improve the agreement between these sea level measurements both local and regional vertical land movements need to be monitored. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Vertical Land Movement Estimates on South Georgia Island: An Impact Study on Sea Level Change from Tide Gauge and Altimetry Measurements
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Abraha, Kibrom Ebuy UL et al

Poster (2017, December 11)

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean has been a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. However, no permanent geodetic monitoring station had been ... [more ▼]

South Georgia Island in the Southern Atlantic Ocean has been a key location for the seismic, geomagnetic and oceanic global monitoring networks. However, no permanent geodetic monitoring station had been established there despite the lack of observations from this region within, for example, the International GNSS Service (IGS) network of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations. Then, in 2013 the King Edward Point (KEP) Geodetic Observatory was established with a focus on sea level studies and in support of general geoscience applications. Currently, this observatory located roughly half-way along the main island and along its northern coastline, consists of two GNSS stations (KEPA and KRSA) with local benchmark networks, allowing the height determinations from the GNSS antennas to be transferred to the KEP tide gauge (GLOSS ID 187) and forming a height reference within the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. In late 2014, three additional GNSS stations (SG01, SG02 and SG03) were established, all on small islands at the perimeter of the main island. Together the stations provide the best possible opportunity to study various geophysical processes in the region. With the GNSS-derived position time series partly reaching over 4.5 years in length, it has become possible to provide first estimates of vertical land movements for the island and KEP with its surrounding area. Together with four precise levelling campaigns of the benchmark network in 2013, 2014 and two in 2017, it has also been possible to investigate the very local character of the vertical motions, ie. the stability of the jetty upon which the tide gauge is mounted. Our measurements show that while South Georgia Island and the area around KEP are rising, the jetty and tide gauge are subsiding. In this study, we will present the preliminary results from the GNSS and levelling measurements and will discuss their impact on the sea level record from the KEP tide gauge which is ideally situated in a mid-ocean location for satellite altimetry calibration over the Southern Atlantic and Southern Oceans. [less ▲]

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See detailCalibration of the Tide Gauge at King Edward Point, South Georgia Island, South Atlantic Ocean
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Woodworth, P. L. et al

Poster (2015, June 27)

In 2008 a new pressure tide gauge with Global Sea Level Observing System Number 187 was installed at King Edward Point (KEP), South Georgia Island, South Atlantic Ocean. This installation was carried out ... [more ▼]

In 2008 a new pressure tide gauge with Global Sea Level Observing System Number 187 was installed at King Edward Point (KEP), South Georgia Island, South Atlantic Ocean. This installation was carried out as part of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current Levels by Altimetry and Island Measurements (ACCLAIM) programme. In 2013 the KEP Geodetic Observatory was established in support of various scientific applications including the monitoring of vertical land movements at KEP. Currently, the observatory consists of two state-of-the-art Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations with local benchmark networks. This ties all benchmarks and the tide gauge into the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2008, and allows the establishment of a local height datum in a global height system through the use of a global gravitational model. In 2014 a tide board was added to the tide gauge, which, together with the GNSS and levelling observations, now enables a calibration of the tide gauge. This will make it possible to include the KEP tide gauge in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database. In this study, we will present the results from the calibration of the tide gauge using the GNSS observations from the KEP Geodetic Observatory for the period from February 2013 to present, the levelling campaigns in 2013 and 2014, and geoid undulations derived from a seamless combination of the latest Gravity Observation Combination (GOCO) 05S and Earth Gravitational Model (EGM) 2008 models. [less ▲]

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See detailA New Datum-Controlled Tide Gauge Record for Sea Level Studies in the South Atlantic Ocean: King Edward Point, South Georgia Island
Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Woodworth, P. L. et al

Poster (2015, June 12)

In 2008 a new pressure tide gauge with Global Sea Level Observing System Number 187 was installed at King Edward Point (KEP), South Georgia Island, South Atlantic Ocean. This installation was carried out ... [more ▼]

In 2008 a new pressure tide gauge with Global Sea Level Observing System Number 187 was installed at King Edward Point (KEP), South Georgia Island, South Atlantic Ocean. This installation was carried out as part of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current Levels by Altimetry and Island Measurements (ACCLAIM) programme. In 2013 the KEP Geodetic Observatory was established in support of various scientific applications including the monitoring of vertical land movements at KEP. Currently, the observatory consists of two state-of-the-art Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations with local benchmark networks. In 2014 a tide board was added to the tide gauge, which, together with the measurements from the KEP Geodetic Observatory, now enables a calibration of the tide gauge. This will make it possible to include the KEP tide gauge in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database and make it available for future sea level studies. In this study, we will present the GNSS and levelling observations from the KEP Geodetic Observatory for the period from February 2013 to May 2015 used for the calibration of the tide gauge. While it is still too early to obtain accurate vertical land movement estimates from the GNSS data, the levelling campaigns in 2013 and 2014 indicated 7-9 mm of subsidence near the tide gauge. For the computation of the new height datum, geoid undulations derived from a seamless combination of the latest Gravity Observation Combination (GOCO) and Earth Gravitational Model (EGM) 2008 models were used. The use of this combined gravity model introduced a datum shift of approximately -24 cm compared to the previous datum. [less ▲]

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