References of "Heymans, Patrick"
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See detailAutomata Language Equivalence vs. Simulations for Model-based Mutant Equivalence: An Empirical Evaluation
Devroey, Xavier; Perrouin, Gilles UL; Papadakis, Mike UL et al

in 10th IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST 2017) (2017)

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See detailTowards Security-aware Mutation Testing
Loise, Thomas; Devroey, Xavier; Perrouin, Gilles et al

in The 12th International Workshop on Mutation Analysis (Mutation 2017) (2017)

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See detailVisual Notation Design 2.0: Towards User-Comprehensible RE Notations
Caire, Patrice UL; Genon, Nicolas; Heymans, patrick et al

in Proceedings of the 21st IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference (2013)

The success of requirements engineering depends critically on effective communication between business analysts and end users, yet empirical studies show that business stakeholders understand RE notations ... [more ▼]

The success of requirements engineering depends critically on effective communication between business analysts and end users, yet empirical studies show that business stakeholders understand RE notations very poorly. This paper proposes a novel approach to designing RE visual notations that actively involves naïve users in the process. We use i*, one of the most influential RE notations, to demonstrate the approach, but the same approach could be applied to any RE notation. We present the results of 5 related empirical studies that show that novices consistently outperform experts in designing symbols that are comprehensible to novices: the differences are both statistically significant and practically meaningful. Symbols designed by novices increased semantic transparency (their ability to be spontaneously interpreted by other novices) by almost 300% compared to the existing i* notation. The results challenge the conventional wisdom about visual notation design: that it should be conducted by a small group of experts; our research suggests that instead it should be conducted by large numbers of novices. This approach is consistent with principles of Web 2.0, in that it harnesses the collective intelligence of end users and actively involves them in the notation design process as “prosumers” rather than as passive consumers. We believe this approach has the potential to radically change the way visual notations are designed in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailBypassing the Combinatorial Explosion: Using Similarity to Generate and Prioritize T-wise Test Suites for Large Software Product Lines
Henard, Christopher UL; Papadakis, Mike UL; Perrouin, Gilles UL et al

Report (2012)

Software Product Lines (SPLs) are families of products whose commonalities and variability can be captured by Feature Models (FMs). T-wise testing aims at finding errors triggered by all interactions ... [more ▼]

Software Product Lines (SPLs) are families of products whose commonalities and variability can be captured by Feature Models (FMs). T-wise testing aims at finding errors triggered by all interactions amongst t features, thus reducing drastically the number of products to test. T-wise testing approaches for SPLs are limited to small values of t -- which miss faulty interactions -- or limited by the size of the FM. Furthermore, they neither prioritize the products to test nor provide means to finely control the generation process. This paper offers (a) a search-based approach capable of generating products for large SPLs, forming a scalable and flexible alternative to current techniques and (b) prioritization algorithms for any set of products. Experiments conducted on 124 FMs (including large FMs such as the Linux kernel) demonstrate the feasibility and the practicality of our approach. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a More Semantically Transparent i* Visual Syntax
Genon, Nicolas; Caire, Patrice UL; Toussaint, Hubert et al

in Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality - Essen, Germany, March 19-22, 2012 (2012)

i* is one of the most popular modelling languages in Requirements Engineering. i* models are meant to support communication between technical and non-technical stakeholders about the goals of the future ... [more ▼]

i* is one of the most popular modelling languages in Requirements Engineering. i* models are meant to support communication between technical and non-technical stakeholders about the goals of the future system. Recent research has established that the effectiveness of model mediated communication heavily depends on the visual syntax of the modelling language. A number of flaws in the visual syntax of i* have been uncovered and possible improvements have been suggested. Producing effective visual notations is a complex task that requires taking into account various interacting quality criteria. In this paper, we focus on one of those criteria: Semantic Transparency, that is, the ability of notation symbols to suggest their meaning. Complementarily to previous research, we take an empirical approach. We give a preview of a series of experiments designed to identify a new symbol set for i* and to evaluate its semantic transparency. The reported work is an important milestone on the path towards cognitively effective requirements modelling notations. Although it does not solve all the problems in the i* notation, it illustrates the usefulness of an empirical approach to visual syntax definition. This approach can later be transposed to other quality criteria and other notations. [less ▲]

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