References of "Herbert, Cornelia"
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See detailAffective evaluation of body images in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2017), 54(S1),

Anorexia nervosa is characterized by fear of weight gain. This is reflected in amygdala activation during confrontation with distorted photographs of oneself simulating weight gain. In contrast ... [more ▼]

Anorexia nervosa is characterized by fear of weight gain. This is reflected in amygdala activation during confrontation with distorted photographs of oneself simulating weight gain. In contrast, photographs of emaciated women induce startle attenuation, suggesting a positive valuation of extreme slimness. To combine these findings, we applied an affective startle modulation paradigm containing photos of the participants simulating weight gain and photos simulating weight loss. We assessed eye-blink startle responses via EMG in 20 women with anorexia nervosa (AN; mean age = 25 years; mean BMI = 23) and 20 healthy control women (HC; mean age = 25 years; mean BMI = 23). We were able to replicate affective startle modulation of standard positive, negative, and neutral pictures, except for an absence of startle attenuation for positive pictures in AN. Body images did not modulate the startle response in either group. This was in contrast to the subjective ratings, in which the AN group indicated negative valence and high arousal for distorted body images. The body photographs used in our study emphasized general body shape and it appears that this was not threatening to AN patients. Photos highlighting body details might produce different results. Considering that body image exposure, a frequently used intervention tool for AN, aims at fear reduction through habituation, it is essential to determine which aspects of the body actually elicit fear responses to maximize therapy outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced early visual processing of own body images in anorexia nervosa: An event-related potentials study
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

Poster (2016)

Introduction. Although body image distortion in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been extensively studied over the past decades, its underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Neuro-imaging studies have ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Although body image distortion in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been extensively studied over the past decades, its underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Neuro-imaging studies have identified functional and structural alterations in brain areas involved in visual body perception, but the time course of visual body processing in AN remains mostly unexplored. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate single processing steps along the time course, particularly the visual processing of physical body image characteristics (featural processing, P1) and the recognition of a body as such (configural processing, N1). Methods. Twenty in-patients with AN, and 20 healthy women viewed photographs of themselves, of another woman’s body and of their own and another woman’s standardized object (cup) with concurrent EEG recording. Results. Body images elicited an accentuation of the P1 component (105-160 ms), which was absent for the comparison between own-body and own-cup images in the AN group. Results regarding the N1 component suggest alterations in object processing in AN. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that individuals with AN show reduced featural processing of their own body image, a process which, due to its position early in the visual processing stream, is unlikely to involve higher cognitive stimulus processing. This suggests a possible role of previously undetected pre-conscious mechanisms in body image disturbance. [less ▲]

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See detailBody or cup? Alterations in featural and configural body image processing in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(supplement 1), 123

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See detailRisk for eating disorders modulates startle-responses to body words
Herbert, Cornelia; Kübler, Andrea; Vögele, Claus UL

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(1), 53667

Body image disturbances are core symptoms of eating disorders (EDs). Recent evidence suggests that changes in body image may occur prior to ED onset and are not restricted to in-vivo exposure (e.g. mirror ... [more ▼]

Body image disturbances are core symptoms of eating disorders (EDs). Recent evidence suggests that changes in body image may occur prior to ED onset and are not restricted to in-vivo exposure (e.g. mirror image), but also evident during presentation of abstract cues such as body shape and weight related words. In the present study startle modulation, heart rate and subjective evaluations were examined during reading of body words and neutral words in 41 student female volunteers screened for risk of EDs. The aim was to determine if responses to body words are attributable to a general negativity bias regardless of ED risk or if activated, ED relevant negative body schemas facilitate priming of defensive responses. Heart rate and word ratings differed between body words and neutral words in the whole female sample, supporting a general processing bias for body weight and shape related concepts in young women regardless of ED risk. Startle modulation was specifically related to eating disorder symptoms as was indicated by significant positive correlations with self-reported body dissatisfaction. These results emphasize the relevance of examining body schema representations as a function of ED risk across different levels of responding. Peripheral-physiological measures such as the startle reflex could possibly be used as predictors of females’ risk for developing EDs in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailDo not respond! Doing the think/no-think and go/no-go task concurrently leads to memory impairment of unpleasant items during later recall
Herbert, Cornelia; Sütterlin, Stefan UL

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2012), 3(269), 1-6

Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories.The present study investigated this hypothesis ... [more ▼]

Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories.The present study investigated this hypothesis behaviorally by combining the think/no-think paradigm (TNT) with a go/no-go motor inhibition task. Participants first learned unpleasant cue-target pairs. Cue words were then presented as go or no-go items in the TNT. Participants’ task was to respond to the cues and think of the target word aloud or to inhibit their response to the cue and the target word from coming to mind. Cued recall assessed immediately after the TNT revealed reduced recall performance for no-go targets compared to go targets or baseline cues not presented in the TNT. The results demonstrate that doing the no-think and no-go task concurrently leads to memory suppression of unpleasant items during later recall. Results are discussed in line with recent empirical research and theoretical positions. [less ▲]

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See detailWho’s that girl? Körperbild, Selbsterkennung und Selbstkonzept bei jungen Frauen mit und ohne Essstörungsrisiko
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Vögele, Claus UL

in Abstract book of 30. Symposium Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie der DGPS Fachgruppe Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie (2012)

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See detailOvercoming selfishness: Reciprocity, inhibition, and cardiac autonomic control in the ultimatum game
Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schmitt, Michael et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2011), 2(173), 1-16

The processes underlying decision-making in response to unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG) have recently been discussed in light of models of reciprocity and fairness-related behavior. It has been ... [more ▼]

The processes underlying decision-making in response to unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG) have recently been discussed in light of models of reciprocity and fairness-related behavior. It has been suggested that behavior following norm-oriented, internalized expectations of reciprocity requires overcoming economic self-interest. In this study we investigated both, behavioral and peripheral-physiological indicators of inhibitory capacity related to neuronal networks that are likely to be involved in the behavioral response to unfair offers. Both heart-rate variability as an index of inhibitory capacity, and performance in a motor response inhibition task predicted rejection of unfair offers in an ultimatum game, suggesting an important role of inhibitory processes in overcoming economic temptations and regulating behavior conforming to social norms of reciprocity and fairness. The role of parasympathetic activity as a physiological trait-marker predicting inter-individual differences in the rejection of unfair offers is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailNegation as a means for emotion regulation? Startle reflex modulation during processing of negated emotional words
Herbert, Cornelia; Deutsch, Roland; Sütterlin, Stefan UL et al

in Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience (2011)

This study investigated startle reflex modulation in 33 healthy student participants during the processing of negated emotional items. To build upon previous research, our particular interest was to find ... [more ▼]

This study investigated startle reflex modulation in 33 healthy student participants during the processing of negated emotional items. To build upon previous research, our particular interest was to find out whether processing of negated emotional items modulates emotional responding in line with the logical meaning of the negated expression, or instead leads to paradox emotional effects that point in the direction opposite the one logically implied by the negation. Startle reflex modulation was assessed during silent reading of pleasant and unpleasant nouns. The nouns were either paired with the possessive pronoun my or with the negation word no. The startle eyeblink amplitude was enhanced during processing of the unpleasant pronoun–noun phrases and attenuated during processing of the pleasant phrases. Negation attenuated the startle eyeblink for negated unpleasant nouns and enhanced it for negated pleasant nouns. In line with this finding, negation decreased arousal ratings for unpleasant nouns and reversed the valence ratings for pleasant nouns. Our results are the first to show an effect of negation on both peripheral physiological and subjective indices of affective responding, which suggests that negation may be an effective strategy for spontaneous down-regulation of emotional responses to unpleasant, but not to pleasant, stimuli. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse Inhibition and Memory Retrieval of Emotional Target Words: Evidence from an Emotional Stop-Signal Task
Herbert, Cornelia; Sütterlin, Stefan UL

in Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science (2011), 1(3), 153-159

Previous research suggests that emotional stimuli capture attention and guide behavior often automatically. The present study investigated the relationship between emotion-driven attention capture and ... [more ▼]

Previous research suggests that emotional stimuli capture attention and guide behavior often automatically. The present study investigated the relationship between emotion-driven attention capture and motor response inhibition to emotional words in the stop-signal task. By experimental variations of the onset of motor response inhibition across the time-course of emotional word processing, we show that processing of emotional information significantly interferes with motor response inhibition in an early time-window, previously related to automatic emotion-driven attention capture. Second, we found that stopping reduced memory recall for unpleasant words during a subsequent surprise free recall task supporting assumptions of a link between mechanisms of motor response inhibition and memory functions. Together, our results provide behavioral evidence for dual competition models of emotion and cognition. This study provides an important link between research focusing on different sub-processes of emotion processing (from perception to action and from action to memory). [less ▲]

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See detailFrames, decisions, and cardiac-autonomic control
Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schmitt, Michael et al

in Social Neuroscience (2011), 6(2), 169-177

The “framing effect” (FE) describes the phenomenon whereby human choices are susceptible to the way they are presented rather than objective information. The present study extends common decision-making ... [more ▼]

The “framing effect” (FE) describes the phenomenon whereby human choices are susceptible to the way they are presented rather than objective information. The present study extends common decision-making paradigms with frame variation by including inhibitory control, operationalized as vagally mediated heart rate variability (HRV) at rest and motor response inhibition during a stop-signal task (SST). We hypothesized that inhibitory control is inversely associated with susceptibility to framing effects. Forty adult volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which identical information about wins and losses was presented using loss or gain frames. As predicted, there was an inverse association between HRV and framing effects, accounting for 23% of the variance in framing effects. Inhibitory control as indexed by performance in the SST was not associated with framing effects. These results are discussed in terms of the role of inhibitory processes (as indicated by vagal activity) for decision-making processes. [less ▲]

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