References of "Guillemin, F"
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See detailSocial disparities and correlates of domestic accidents.
Baumann, Michèle UL; Spitz, E.; Ravaud, J. et al

in Psychology & Health (2009)

Domestic accidents are a public health problem. This study assessed the disparities between socioeconomic positions and the confounding role of gender, age, education, living alone, income, poor health ... [more ▼]

Domestic accidents are a public health problem. This study assessed the disparities between socioeconomic positions and the confounding role of gender, age, education, living alone, income, poor health, obesity, current tobacco use, alcohol abuse, fatigue/sleep disorders, and physical, sensorial and cognitive disabilities. Methods: 6,198 people aged ≥15, randomly selected in north-eastern France completed a post-mailed questionnaire including domestic accident(s) during the last two years. The data were analyzed via logistic models. Findings: Domestic accidents affected 3.1% of subjects. Manual workers and clerks had higher risks (age-gender adjusted OR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1-2.6 and 1.5, 1.0-2.4) compared with the other socioeconomic groups. These differences became non significant when controlling for all covariates of which those significant were: sex, current tobacco use, alcohol abuse, and fatigue/sleep disorders (adjusted odds ratios 1.48-1.88). Discussion: There are social disparities in domestic accidents, and they are confounded by sex, substance use, and fatigue/sleep disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the expectations osteoarthritis patients have concerning healthcare, and their implications for practitioners
Baumann, Michèle UL; Euller-Ziegler, L.; Guillemin, F.

in Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology (2007), 25

The expectations of patients with osteoarthritis are essential for health care provision and may be used to improve the patient-doctor relationship. Methods: A total of 96 osteoarthritis patients aged 42 ... [more ▼]

The expectations of patients with osteoarthritis are essential for health care provision and may be used to improve the patient-doctor relationship. Methods: A total of 96 osteoarthritis patients aged 42-89 years (mean = 65; 81% female) were recruited among customers of 10 pharmacies in 10 towns in 10 regions (selected at random from the 22 French regions). Ten focus groups were organized looking at three categories of expectation: 1) Information about and understanding of osteoarthritis; its impact on lifestyle, and its treatment, consequences, and outlook; 2) Communication skills, attitudes of practitioners and communication between health professionals; 3) Support available from doctors, family circle and society. Results: The patient-practitioner relationship begins with a dialogue. Participants suggested that its quality can be improved by: Developing greater trust: patients expect communication skills and expressions of sympathy that practitioners seem ill-prepared to provide. Strengthening involvement: general practitioners in particular should act as mediators and facilitators to improve recognition and understanding of osteoarthritis by employers and public decision-makers. Conclusions: The present study enabled patients to express their expectations. Meeting those expectations could markedly improve the therapeutic process, but the question arises of whether practitioners are ready to agree that there is a need to reconsider and modify the care they provide for their patients. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations of social and material deprivation with tobacco, alcohol, and psychotropic drug use, and gender differentials: a population-based study
Baumann, Michèle UL; Spitz, Elisabeth; Guillemin, F. et al

in International Journal of Health Geographics (2007), 2

The aim was to assess the relationships between social and material deprivation and the use of tobacco, excessive alcohol and psychotropic drugs by both sexes and in various age groups. Greater knowledge ... [more ▼]

The aim was to assess the relationships between social and material deprivation and the use of tobacco, excessive alcohol and psychotropic drugs by both sexes and in various age groups. Greater knowledge concerning these issues may help public health policy-makers design more effective means of preventing substance abuse. Methods: The sample comprised 6,216 people aged ≥ 15 years randomly selected from the population in northeastern France. Subjects completed a post-mailed questionnaire covering socio-demographic characteristics, occupation, employment, income, smoking habit, alcohol abuse and "psychotropic" drug intake (for headache, tiredness, nervousness, anxiety, insomnia). A deprivation score (D) was defined by the cumulative number of: low educational level, manual worker, unemployed, living alone, nationality other than western European, low income, and non-home-ownership. Data were analysed using adjusted odds ratios (ORa) computed with logistic models. Results: Deprivation was common: 37.4% of respondents fell into category D = 1, 21.2% into D = 2, and 10.0% into D ≥ 3. More men than women reported tobacco use (30.2% vs. 21.9%) and alcohol abuse (12.5% vs. 3.3%), whereas psychotropic drug use was more common among women (23.8% vs. 41.0%). Increasing levels of deprivation were associated with a greater likelihood of tobacco use (ORa vs. D = 0: 1.16 in D = 1, 1.49 in D = 2, and 1.93 in D ≥ 3), alcohol abuse (1.19 in D = 1, 1.32 in D = 2, and 1.80 in D ≥ 3) and frequent psychotropic drug intake (1.26 in D = 1, 1.51 in D = 2, and 1.91 in D ≥ 3). These patterns were observed in working/other non-retired men and women (except for alcohol abuse in women). Among retired people, deprivation was associated with tobacco and psychotropic drug use only in men. Conclusion: Preventive measures should be designed to improve work conditions, reduce deprivation, and help deprived populations to be more aware of risk and to find remedial measures. [less ▲]

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See detailContent of quality-of-life instruments is affected by item-generation methods
Rat, A. C.; Pouchot, J.; Guillemin, F. et al

in International Journal for Quality in Health Care (2007), 19(6), 390-398

Methods used to generate items for complex measurement scales are heterogeneous and probably produce heterogeneous data, yet nothing is known about the advantages of one method over another. Objective. We ... [more ▼]

Methods used to generate items for complex measurement scales are heterogeneous and probably produce heterogeneous data, yet nothing is known about the advantages of one method over another. Objective. We aimed to compare methods of generating items for tools designed to measure quality-of-life for patients. Methods. We used five methods to develop a quality-of-life instrument for patients with lower-limb osteoarthritis: individual interviews with patients involving two different techniques (semi-structured and cognitive), individual interviews with health professionals, and focus groups of patients and health professionals. The process generated 80 items, of which 37 were excluded after content and psychometric analysis. With the final 43-item scale used as a ‘reference standard’, we estimated the contribution of each method. Results. For health professionals, the focus group and individual interviews produced 35 and 81% of the items, respectively. For patients, the focus groups produced 74% of the items and both interview techniques 100% of the items. Health professionals provided a narrower picture of the effects of the disease on quality-of-life. Focus groups contributed less to social domains than did individual interviews. The two patient interview techniques highlighted different themes. Conclusion. In developing a complex measurement scale for patients, we found individual interviews with patients the best method for formulating items; other methods such as physician interviews and focus groups contributed no additional information. Reports of instrument generation should include details of the item-generation step, the methods used to develop items and the number of people involved. [less ▲]

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See detailAre there more than cross-selectional relationships of social support and social network with functional limitations and psychological distress in early rheumatoid arthritis ? The URIDISS longitudinal study
Demange, L.; Guillemin, F.; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Arthritis Care and Research (2004), 51(5), 782-791

Objective. To investigate whether greater social support and support network are cross-sectionally associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress in patients with early rheumatoid ... [more ▼]

Objective. To investigate whether greater social support and support network are cross-sectionally associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA); whether this association is constant over time; and whether increases in social support or support network are associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress. Methods. Subjects were from the European Research on Incapacitating Diseases and Social Support cohort and had early RA. Social support, support network, functional limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire), and psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire) were assessed annually. Variance and covariance analyses with repeated measures were performed. Results. A total of 542 subjects were assessed for 3 years. On average, patients with a greater amount of specific social support or a stronger specific support network experienced less functional limitation and less psychological distress. Changes in a given subject’s functional limitations and psychological distress did not depend on his or her baseline social support or support network. Neither social support nor support network change over time. Conclusion. There may be a cross-sectional link between specific social support or support network and functional limitations and psychological distress, but no longitudinal association could be evidenced. [less ▲]

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