References of "Greiff, Samuel 50001890"
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See detailThe English and German versions of the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity Scale: Establishing measurement invariance across nationality and gender groups
Niepel, Christoph UL; Greiff, Samuel UL; Mohr, Jonathan J. et al

in Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity (in press)

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See detailAssessment of problem solving and higher order thinking
Greiff, Samuel UL; Martin, Romain UL

in Spector, J. M. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Educational Technology (in press)

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See detailDispositions for collaborative problem solving.
Scalise, Kathleen; Mustafic, Maida UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Kuger, Susanne; Klieme, Eckhard; Jude, Nina (Eds.) et al Assessing context of learning world-wide (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (12 UL)
See detailAssessment of problem solving
Krkovic, K.; Mustafic, Maida UL; Wüstenberg, S. et al

in Griffin, P.; McGaw, B.; Care, E. (Eds.) Assessment and teaching of 21st century skills (in press)

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See detailEmpirical work on computer-based assessment of domain-general complex problem solving skills
Molnar, G.; Greiff, Samuel UL; Wüstenberg, Sascha UL et al

in Csapo, Beno; Funke, Joachim (Eds.) The nature of problem solving (in press)

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See detailThe role of planning in complex problem solving
Eichmann, Beate; Goldhammer, Frank; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Computers & Education (2019), 128

Complex problem solving (CPS) is a highly transversal competence needed in educational and vocational settings as well as everyday life. The assessment of CPS is often computer-based, and therefore ... [more ▼]

Complex problem solving (CPS) is a highly transversal competence needed in educational and vocational settings as well as everyday life. The assessment of CPS is often computer-based, and therefore provides data regarding not only the outcome but also the process of CPS. However, research addressing this issue is scarce. In this article we investigated planning activities in the process of complex problem solving. We operationalized planning through three behavioral measures indicating the duration of the longest planning interval, the delay of the longest planning interval and the variance of intervals between each two successive interactions. We found a significant negative average effect for our delay indicator, indicating that early planning in CPS is more beneficial. However, we also found effects depending on task and interaction effects for all three indicators, suggesting that the effects of different planning behaviors on CPS are highly intertwined. [less ▲]

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See detailReplicating and extending the GI/E model: Social and dimensional comparison effects of achievement on test anxiety in math, physics, German, and English
Talic, Irma UL; Franzen, Patrick UL; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, November 09)

The internal/external frame of reference model (I/E model; Marsh, 1986) depicts the formation of academic self-concept by assuming an interplay of social and dimensional comparison processes within and ... [more ▼]

The internal/external frame of reference model (I/E model; Marsh, 1986) depicts the formation of academic self-concept by assuming an interplay of social and dimensional comparison processes within and across different domains. Associations between achievement and self-concept are expected to be positive within one given domain due to social comparisons (i.e., external frame of reference) and negative across different domains due to dimensional comparisons (i.e., internal frame of reference). The Generalized I/E model (GI/E model; Möller, Müller-Kalthoff, Helm, Nagy, & Marsh, 2015) allows for the inclusion of other outcome variables besides academic self-concept, for example, interest or motivation. The present research aimed at applying the GI/E model to the construct of test anxiety, thereby replicating and significantly extending some first supportive findings on the validity of the GI/E model with test anxiety (Arens, Becker, & Möller, 2017). To this end, we expanded the scope of the GI/E model with test anxiety for the first time to four domains; namely math, physics, German, and English. For this purpose, we drew on a sample of N = 305 9th and 10th graders attending the highest ability school track (i.e., Gymnasium) from six different secondary schools in four German federal states. Analyses were carried out using structural equation modelling in Mplus 8. We used school grades in the respective domains as achievement indicators. Test anxiety was assessed separately for each domain while simultaneously differentiating between two components of test anxiety; namely, worry and emotionality. Our results suggested negative within-domain relations between achievement and test anxiety in all four domains (i.e., higher grades were associated with less test anxiety). The pattern of results for the relations across domains was not as clear. Positive links between achievement and test anxiety across domains (i.e., higher grades in domain A were associated with higher test anxiety in domain B) were weak and could only be established for the association between German achievement and students’ worry in mathematics. These findings partially supported the assumptions made by the GI/E model. As such, we replicated preexisting findings and added novel insights to the GI/E model. Our results were discussed within the framework of self-concept theory and research as well as dimensional comparison theory. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping and validating a short-form questionnaire for the assessment of seven conscientiousness facets in educational large-scale assessments
Franzen, Patrick UL; van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, November 09)

The influence of personality on academic outcomes has been demonstrated consistently in previous research. In particular, conscientiousness and its lower order facets generally show the strongest ... [more ▼]

The influence of personality on academic outcomes has been demonstrated consistently in previous research. In particular, conscientiousness and its lower order facets generally show the strongest predictive validity for academic success. MacCann et al. (2009) constructed a 68-item questionnaire for the comprehensive assessment of different conscientiousness facets in secondary education. However, such questionnaires are arguably too long for the use in large-scale educational assessments. Investigating the influence of conscientiousness facets within large-scale educational assessments is, nevertheless, crucial for advancing our knowledge of the differential influence of facets on various academic outcomes. Short and psychometrically sound questionnaires are thus required. Currently, no short and yet comprehensive questionnaire assessing the lower order facets of conscientiousness, that is suitable for large-scale educational assessments exists. Therefore, within the present investigation we develop a short-form instrument based upon the seven-factor version (59 items) of the questionnaire presented by MacCann et al. (2009), by using an exhaustive search algorithm and traditional item selection methods. Our sample consists of a large and representative dataset comprising all 9th grade students in Luxembourg from the Luxembourgish national school monitoring system (N = 6325; see epstan.lu), who answered French and German adaptations of the original 59-item questionnaire. We specified the exhaustive search algorithm to select the best possible combination of four items for each lower order facet, by considering goodness of fit criteria, factor saturation statistics, and measurement invariance between the German and French version. In addition, we used Mokken scale analysis and assessed the congruence of item wordings and theoretical definitions of each lower order facet to ensure content validity. We finally selected four to five items per scale based on our analyses. We found good fit statistics for all lower order facet scales (CFI >.95, RMSEA < 0.05), and acceptable to good factor saturation statistics for all but one of these scales (McDonalds ω > 0.7). On top of that, all scales show either scalar invariance, or partial scalar invariance between the German and French language version. The result of our investigation is a short and psychometrically sound instrument for the assessment of the lower order facets of conscientiousness. It is specifically tailored towards the unique context of the multilingual Luxembourgish educational system, and can be used in the upcoming Épstan cohorts. [less ▲]

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See detailDimensional and Social Comparisons Effects on Domain-Specific Self-Concepts and Interests: A Study of Elementary School Children from Luxembourg Across Two Waves
van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Talic, Irma UL; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, November 09)

Already at the beginning of elementary school, students start to develop self-beliefs and attitudes that reflect their motivation, thoughts, and feelings about a specific school domain. The internal ... [more ▼]

Already at the beginning of elementary school, students start to develop self-beliefs and attitudes that reflect their motivation, thoughts, and feelings about a specific school domain. The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model (Marsh, 1986) encapsulates this phenomenon by explicating the formation of academic self-concept through a combination of social (i.e. comparing one’s achievement in one domain with the achievement of one’s peers in the same domain) and dimensional (i.e. comparing one’s achievement in one domain with one’s achievement in another domain) comparison processes. The recently established generalized internal/external frame of reference (GI/E) model (Möller, Müller-Kalthoff, Helm, Nagy, & Marsh, 2015) builds on the I/E model by extending it to the formation of other subject-specific academic self-beliefs and attitudes, such as interest and test anxiety. Despite the salience of the (G)I/E model in educational research, studies investigating the formation of self-beliefs and attitudes according to this model remains scarce among elementary school children. This study aims to contribute to the current literature by examining the associations between verbal and mathematics achievement, on the one hand, and corresponding domain-specific self-concepts and interests, on the other hand. A population of Luxembourgish elementary school students was assessed twice, two years apart (once in Grade 1 and once in Grade 3) as part of the Luxembourgish school monitoring system (EpStan, cohorts 2014 & 2016; epstan.lu). Using a domain-specific approach, students were assessed on math and verbal achievement as well as German- and math self-concept and interest. This culminated in a sample of N = 3606 elementary school children who participated in both waves. German- and math self-concepts and interests were self-reported whereas standardized achievement tests (see epstan.lu) were used as indicators of math and verbal (Luxembourgish for Grade 1 and German for Grade 3) achievement. Cross-lagged structural equation modelling was performed in Mplus 8 using WLSMV estimation for categorical variables. Overall, the results suggest strong support for the (G)I/E model for Grade 3, while only partial support was found for the (G)I/E model for Grade 1. More specifically, for both Grade 1 and Grade 3, achievement was positively related to self-concept and interest within the same domain. Negative relations between achievement and self-concept and interest across domains were found in Grade 3, but not in Grade 1. The findings are discussed within the context of theory and research on self-concept differentiation processes, dimensional comparison theory, and the multilingual Luxembourgish educational system. [less ▲]

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See detailEducational assessment and its prospects in the 21st century
Greiff, Samuel UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

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See detailUsing Log-File Data to Uncover Strategy Use in Complex Problem Solving
Nicolay, Björn Fabrice UL; Krieger, Florian UL; Lagou, Charalampia UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, September 18)

The aim of the current project is to utilize log-file data to enhance the understanding of strategy use in Complex Problem Solving (CPS). CPS can be defined as the ability to manipulate the existing ... [more ▼]

The aim of the current project is to utilize log-file data to enhance the understanding of strategy use in Complex Problem Solving (CPS). CPS can be defined as the ability to manipulate the existing variables of a particular novel, complex, intransparent, and dynamic environment successfully in order to reach a predefined goal. In order to successfully solve a CPS task, the goal-directed application and variation of certain strategies is necessary. To uncover the systematic use of these strategies, log-files have been deemed a fruitful resource as they contain not only the final results of a computer-based CPS item, but also the individual steps undertaken while solving such a task. Recent studies using log-files have highlighted the importance of some strategies for CPS, like the varying one variable at a time (VOTAT) strategy, or of engaging in noninterfering observations (i.e., idle rounds). In addition, other strategies have also been shown to be relevant in neighboring fields of CPS. However, comprehensive studies investigating a broad repertoire of strategies applied in CPS are scarce. Hence, on the basis of existing large-scale assessment data sets, the present project set out to investigate which strategies hidden in log-files are relevant for solving a CPS task in order to gain a more thorough understanding of how CPS tasks are being approached. Preliminary findings indicate that, in addition to VOTAT and idle rounds, particularly the flexibility of switching between strategies should be taken into account. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Vorhersage von Selbstkontrolle durch Need for Cognition. Generalisierbarkeit und Erklärungsansätze
Grass, Julia; Krieger, Florian UL; Paulus, P. et al

Scientific Conference (2018, September)

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See detailProblem solving and its role in large-scale assessments. Transversal skills in educational research
Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September)

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See detailIntroducing MaFIN. A dynamic matrices finite state automata test
Kunze, Thiemo UL; Krieger, Florian UL; Stadler, Matthias UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

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See detailChair “Testing in the workplace”
Greiff, Samuel UL

Diverse speeches and writings (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 UL)