References of "Grötzinger, J"
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See detailThe matrix metalloproteinase 9 (mmp-9) hemopexin domain is a novel gelatin binding domain and acts as an antagonist
Roeb, E.; Schleinkofer, K.; Kernebeck, T. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 277(52), 50326-32

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the remodeling processes of the extracellular matrix and the basement membrane. Most MMPs are composed of a regulatory, a catalytic, and a hemopexin ... [more ▼]

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the remodeling processes of the extracellular matrix and the basement membrane. Most MMPs are composed of a regulatory, a catalytic, and a hemopexin subunit. In many tumors the expression of MMP-9 correlates with local tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. To analyze the role of the hemopexin domain in these processes, the MMP-9 hemopexin domain (MMP-9-PEX) was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. After proteolytic cleavage, the isolated PEX domain was purified by size exclusion chromatography. In a zymography assay, MMP-9-PEX was able to inhibit MMP-9 activity. The association and dissociation rates for the interaction of MMP-9-PEX with gelatin were determined by plasmon resonance. From the measured rate constants, the dissociation constant was calculated to be K(d) = 2,4 x 10(-8) m, demonstrating a high affinity between MMP-9-PEX and gelatin. In Boyden chamber experiments the recombinant MMP-9-PEX was able to inhibit the invasion of melanoma cells secreting high amounts of MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate for the first time that the hemopexin domain of MMP-9 has a high affinity binding site for gelatin, and the particular recombinant domain is able to block MMP-9 activity and tumor cell invasion. Because MMP-9 plays an important role in metastasis, this antagonistic effect may be utilized to design MMP inhibition-based cancer therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (0 UL)
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See detailMapping of a region within the N terminus of Jak1 involved in cytokine receptor interaction
Haan, Claude UL; Isharc, H.; Hermanns, H. M. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2001), 276(40), 37451-8

Janus kinase 1 (Jak1) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that noncovalently associates with a variety of cytokine receptors. Here we show that the in vitro translated N-terminal domains of Jak1 are ... [more ▼]

Janus kinase 1 (Jak1) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that noncovalently associates with a variety of cytokine receptors. Here we show that the in vitro translated N-terminal domains of Jak1 are sufficient for binding to a biotinylated peptide comprising the membrane-proximal 73 amino acids of gp130, the signal-transducing receptor chain of interleukin-6-type cytokines. By the fold recognition approach amino acid residues 36-112 of Jak1 were predicted to adopt a beta-grasp fold, and a structural model was built using ubiquitin as a template. Substitution of Tyr(107) to alanine, a residue conserved among Jaks and involved in hydrophobic core interactions of the proposed beta-grasp domain, abrogated binding of full-length Jak1 to gp130 in COS-7 transfectants. By further mutagenesis we identified the loop 4 region of the Jak1 beta-grasp domain as essential for gp130 association and gp130-mediated signal transduction. In Jak1-deficient U4C cells reconstituted with the loop 4 Jak1 mutants L80A/Y81A and Delta(Tyr(81)-Ser(84)), the interferon-gamma, interferon-alpha, and interleukin-6 responses were similarly impaired. Thus, loop 4 of the beta-grasp domain plays a role in the association of Jak1 with both class I and II cytokine receptors. Taken together the structural model and the mutagenesis data provide further insight into the interaction of Janus kinases with cytokine receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailAn MMP-9 mutant without gelatinolytic activity as a novel TIMP-1-antagonist
Roeb, E.; Behrmann, Iris UL; Grötzinger, J. et al

in FASEB Journal (2000), 14(12), 1671-3

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 UL)
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See detailCharacterization and binding specificity of the monomeric STAT3-SH2 domain.
Haan, Serge UL; Hemmann, U.; Hassiepen, U. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1999), 274(3), 1342-8

Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are important mediators of cytokine signal transduction. STAT factors are recruited to phosphotyrosine-containing motifs of activated receptor ... [more ▼]

Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are important mediators of cytokine signal transduction. STAT factors are recruited to phosphotyrosine-containing motifs of activated receptor chains via their SH2 domains. The subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the STATs leads to their dissociation from the receptor, dimerization, and translocation to the nucleus. Here we describe the expression, purification, and refolding of the STAT3-SH2 domain. Proper folding of the isolated protein was proven by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The STAT3-SH2 domain undergoes a conformational change upon dimerization. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we demonstrate that the monomeric domain binds to specific phosphotyrosine peptides. The specificity of binding to phosphotyrosine peptides was assayed with the tyrosine motif encompassing Tyr705 of STAT3 and with all tyrosine motifs present in the cytoplasmic tail of the signal transducer gp130. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (5 UL)