References of "Goffaux, Valerie"
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See detailInhibition of return and attentional facilitation: Numbers can be counted in, letters tell a different story.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valerie; Schuller, Anne-Marie UL et al

in Acta psychologica (2015), 163

Prior research has provided strong evidence for spatial-numerical associations. Single digits can for instance act as attentional cues, orienting visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield ... [more ▼]

Prior research has provided strong evidence for spatial-numerical associations. Single digits can for instance act as attentional cues, orienting visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield depending on the digit's magnitude, thus facilitating target detection in the cued hemifield (left/right hemifield after small/large digits, respectively). Studies using other types of behaviourally or biologically relevant central cues known to elicit automated symbolic attention orienting effects such as arrows or gaze have shown that the initial facilitation of cued target detection can turn into inhibition at longer stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). However, no studies so far investigated whether inhibition of return (IOR) is also observed using digits as uninformative central cues. To address this issue we designed an attentional cueing paradigm using SOAs ranging from 500ms to 1650ms. As expected, the results showed a facilitation effect at the relatively short 650ms SOA, replicating previous findings. At the long 1650ms SOA, however, participants were faster to detect targets in the uncued hemifield compared to the cued hemifield, showing an IOR effect. A control experiment with letters showed no such congruency effects at any SOA. These findings provide the first evidence that digits not only produce facilitation effects at shorter intervals, but also induce inhibitory effects at longer intervals, confirming that Arabic digits engage automated symbolic orienting of attention. [less ▲]

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See detailHorizontal tuning for faces originates in high-level Fusiform Face Area.
Goffaux, Valerie; Duecker, Felix; Hausfeld, Lars et al

in Neuropsychologia (2015), 81

Recent work indicates that the specialization of face visual perception relies on the privileged processing of horizontal angles of facial information. This suggests that stimulus properties assumed to be ... [more ▼]

Recent work indicates that the specialization of face visual perception relies on the privileged processing of horizontal angles of facial information. This suggests that stimulus properties assumed to be fully resolved in primary visual cortex (V1; e.g., orientation) in fact determine human vision until high-level stages of processing. To address this hypothesis, the present fMRI study explored the orientation sensitivity of V1 and high-level face-specialized ventral regions such as the Occipital Face Area (OFA) and Fusiform Face Area (FFA) to different angles of face information. Participants viewed face images filtered to retain information at horizontal, vertical or oblique angles. Filtered images were viewed upright, inverted and (phase-)scrambled. FFA responded most strongly to the horizontal range of upright face information; its activation pattern reliably separated horizontal from oblique ranges, but only when faces were upright. Moreover, activation patterns induced in the right FFA and the OFA by upright and inverted faces could only be separated based on horizontal information. This indicates that the specialized processing of upright face information in the OFA and FFA essentially relies on the encoding of horizontal facial cues. This pattern was not passively inherited from V1, which was found to respond less strongly to horizontal than other orientations likely due to adaptive whitening. Moreover, we found that orientation decoding accuracy in V1 was impaired for stimuli containing no meaningful shape. By showing that primary coding in V1 is influenced by high-order stimulus structure and that high-level processing is tuned to selective ranges of primary information, the present work suggests that primary and high-level levels of the visual system interact in order to modulate the processing of certain ranges of primary information depending on their relevance with respect to the stimulus and task at hand. [less ▲]

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See detailHorizontal tuning of face-specific processing from childhood to elderly adulthood.
Goffaux, Valerie; Poncin, Aude; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2015)

Face recognition in adults recruits specialised mechanisms that are selectively driven by horizontal information. This range indeed conveys the most optimal and stable cues to identity. Whether the ... [more ▼]

Face recognition in adults recruits specialised mechanisms that are selectively driven by horizontal information. This range indeed conveys the most optimal and stable cues to identity. Whether the horizontal tuning of adult face recognition reflects horizontal bias already active at infancy and/or whether it also results from the extensive experience acquired with faces over the lifespan is elusive. Answering these questions is crucial to determine the information constraining the developmental specialisation of core visual functions such as face perception. Participants aged between 6 and 74 years matched unfamiliar faces that were filtered to retain information in narrow ranges centred on horizontal (H), vertical (V), or both orientation ranges (HV). H and V ranges respectively maximize and minimize the recruitment of face-specific mechanisms (Goffaux and Dakin, 2010). Stimuli were presented at upright and inverted planar orientations and the face inversion effect (FIE; i.e., better performance for upright than inverted faces) was taken as a marker of face-specific processing. In H and HV conditions, FIE size increased linearly from childhood to adulthood, manifesting the progressive specialization of face perception. FIE emerged earlier when processing HV than H faces (FIE onset: 6 and 12 years, respectively) indicating that until 12 years horizontal information is necessary but not sufficient to trigger face-specialised processing. Partial correlations further showed that FIE development in HV condition was not fully explained by FIE development in H condition. Besides a progressive maturation of horizontal processing, the specialization of the face processing system thus also depends on the improved integration of horizontal range with other orientations. In contrast, FIE size was small and stable when processing V information. These results show that the face processing system matures over the life span based on the refined encoding of horizontally-oriented (upright) face cues. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. [less ▲]

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See detailSelectivity of Face Perception to Horizontal Information over Lifespan (from 6 to 74 Year Old).
Goffaux, Valerie; Poncin, Aude; Schiltz, Christine UL

in PloS one (2015), 10(9), 0138812

Face recognition in young human adults preferentially relies on the processing of horizontally-oriented visual information. We addressed whether the horizontal tuning of face perception is modulated by ... [more ▼]

Face recognition in young human adults preferentially relies on the processing of horizontally-oriented visual information. We addressed whether the horizontal tuning of face perception is modulated by the extensive experience humans acquire with faces over the lifespan, or whether it reflects an invariable processing bias for this visual category. We tested 296 subjects aged from 6 to 74 years in a face matching task. Stimuli were upright and inverted faces filtered to preserve information in the horizontal or vertical orientation, or both (HV) ranges. The reliance on face-specific processing was inferred based on the face inversion effect (FIE). FIE size increased linearly until young adulthood in the horizontal but not the vertical orientation range of face information. These findings indicate that the protracted specialization of the face processing system relies on the extensive experience humans acquire at encoding the horizontal information conveyed by upright faces. [less ▲]

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See detailShifts of spatial attention cued by irrelevant numbers: Electrophysiological evidence from a target discrimination task
Schuller, Anne-Marie UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie et al

in Journal of cognitive pychology (2014)

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects ... [more ▼]

Fischer et al. demonstrated that a centrally presented number can shift attention to the left/right when its magnitude is small/large. Two electrophysiological studies described these attentional effects as eventrelated potentials (ERPs) at centro-parietal sites. Since both studies used target detection tasks, it remains currently unknown whether similar results would be obtained with a discrimination task. We used ERPs to test whether digit cues also induce attention shifts when participants perform a feature discrimination task on targets. ERPs were recorded whereas subjects discriminated the colour of lateral targets that were preceded by a central non-predictive digit. Analysis of cue-locked controlateral vs. ipsilateral ERP activity showed the emergence of early preparatory attention-directing components in parietal and frontal regions. Moreover, target-locked P1 components at occipito-parietal sites were significantly modulated by digit magnitude-target side congruency. These results demonstrate that irrelevant digit cues also bias sensory processing when embedded in a feature-discrimination task. [less ▲]

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See detailFace perception is tuned to horizontal orientation in the N170 time window
Jacques, Corentin; Schiltz, Christine UL; Goffaux, Valerie

in Journal of Vision (2014), 14(2), 1-18

The specificity of face perception is thought to reside both in its dramatic vulnerability to picture-plane inversion and its strong reliance on horizontally oriented image content. Here we asked when in ... [more ▼]

The specificity of face perception is thought to reside both in its dramatic vulnerability to picture-plane inversion and its strong reliance on horizontally oriented image content. Here we asked when in the visual processing stream face-specific perception is tuned to horizontal information. We measured the behavioral performance and scalp event-related potentials (ERP) when participants viewed upright and inverted images of faces and cars (and natural scenes) that were phase- randomized in a narrow orientation band centered either on vertical or horizontal orientation. For faces, the magnitude of the inversion effect (IE) on behavioral discrimination performance was significantly reduced for horizontally randomized compared to vertically or nonrandomized images, confirming the importance of horizontal information for the recruitment of face- specific processing. Inversion affected the processing of nonrandomized and vertically randomized faces early, in the N170 time window. In contrast, the magnitude of the N170 IE was much smaller for horizontally randomized faces. The present research indicates that the early face- specific neural representations are preferentially tuned to horizontal information and offers new perspectives for a description of the visual information feeding face- specific perception. [less ▲]

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See detailSelectivity of face perception to horizontal information over lifespan (from 6 to 74 year old)
Goffaux, Valerie; Poncin, Aude; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2014)

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See detailLocal discriminability determines the strength of holistic processing for faces in the fusiform face area
Goffaux, Valerie; Schiltz, Christine UL; Mur, Marieke et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2013), 3

Recent evidence suggests that the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) is not exclusively dedicated to the interactive processing of face features, but also contains neurons sensitive to local features.This suggests ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) is not exclusively dedicated to the interactive processing of face features, but also contains neurons sensitive to local features.This suggests the existence of both interactive and local processing modes, consistent with recent behavioral findings that the strength of interactive feature processing (IFP) engages most strongly when similar features need to be disambiguated. Here we address whether the engagement of the FFA into interactive versus featural representational modes is governed by local feature discriminability.We scanned human participants while they matched target features within face pairs, independently of the context of distracter features. IFP was operationalized as the failure to match the target without being distracted by distracter features. Picture-plane inversion was used to disrupt IFP while preserving input properties.We found that FFA activationwas comparably strong, irrespective of whether similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts(i.e., inducing robust IFP) or dissimilar target featureswere embedded in the same context (i.e., engaging local processing). Second, inversion decreased FFA activation to faces most robustly when similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts, indicating that FFA engages into IFP mainly when features cannot be disambiguated at a local level.Third, by means of Spearman rank correlation tests, we show that the local processing of feature differences in the FFA is supported to a large extent by the Occipital Face Area, the Lateral Occipital Complex, and early visual cortex, suggesting that these regions encode the local aspects of face information. The present findings confirm the co-existence of holistic and featural representations in the FFA. Furthermore, they establish FFA as the main contributor to the featural/holistic representational mode switches determined by local discriminability. [less ▲]

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See detailAttentional shifts induced by uninformative number symbols modulate neural activity in human occipital cortex
Goffaux, Valerie; Martin, Romain UL; Dormal, Giulia et al

in Neuropsychologia (2012), 50

Number processing interacts with space encoding in a wide variety of experimental paradigms. Most intriguingly, the passive viewing of uninformative number symbols can shift visuo-spatial attention to ... [more ▼]

Number processing interacts with space encoding in a wide variety of experimental paradigms. Most intriguingly, the passive viewing of uninformative number symbols can shift visuo-spatial attention to different target locations according to the number magnitude, i.e., small/large numbers facilitate processing of left/right targets, respectively. The brain architecture dedicated to these attention shifts associated with numbers currently remains unknown. Evoked potential recordings indicate that both early and late stages are involved in this spatio-numerical interaction, but the neuro-functional anatomy needs to be specified. Here we use, for the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate attentional orienting following uninformative Arabic digits. We show that BOLD response in occipital visual regions was modulated by the congruency between digit magnitude (small/large) and target side (left/right). Additionally, we report higher BOLD responses following large (8, 9) compared to small (1, 2) digits in two bilateral parietal regions, yielding a significant effect of digit magnitude. We propose and discuss the view that encoding of semantic representations related to number symbols in parietal cortex led to shifts in visuo-spatial attention and enhanced visual processing in the occipital cortex according to number-space congruency rules. [less ▲]

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See detailAttentional shifts induced by uninformative number symbols modulate neural activity in human occipital cortex
Goffaux, Valérie; Martin, Romain UL; Dormal, Giulia et al

in Neuropsychologia (2012), 50

Number processing interacts with space encoding in a wide variety of experimental paradigms. Most intriguingly, the passive viewing of uninformative number symbols can shift visuo-spatial attention to ... [more ▼]

Number processing interacts with space encoding in a wide variety of experimental paradigms. Most intriguingly, the passive viewing of uninformative number symbols can shift visuo-spatial attention to different target locations according to the number magnitude, i.e., small/large numbers facilitate processing of left/right targets, respectively. The brain architecture dedicated to these attention shifts associated with numbers remains unknown. Evoked potential recordings indicate that both early and late stages are involved in this spatio-numerical interaction, but the neuro-functional anatomy needs to be specified. Here we use, for the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate attentional orienting following uninformative Arabic digits. We show that BOLD response in occipital visual regions is modulated by the congruency between digit magnitude (small/large) and target side (left/right). Additionally, we report higher BOLD responses following large (8, 9) compared to small (1, 2) digits in two bilateral parietal regions, yielding a significant effect of digit magnitude. We propose and discuss the view that encoding of semantic representations related to number symbols in parietal cortex leads to shifts in visuo-spatial attention and enhances visual processing in the occipital cortex according to number-space congruency rules. [less ▲]

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See detailOrientation tuning for faces in the Fusiform Face Area and Primary Visual Cortex
Goffaux, Valerie; Duecker, Felix; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2012, September)

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See detailAttentional shifts induced by uninformative number symbols modulate neural activity in human occipital cortex
Schiltz, Christine UL; Goffaux, Valérie; Martin, Romain UL et al

Presentation (2012, July 17)

Number processing interacts with space encoding in a wide variety of experimental paradigms. Most intriguingly, the passive viewing of uninformative number symbols can shift visuo-spatial attention to ... [more ▼]

Number processing interacts with space encoding in a wide variety of experimental paradigms. Most intriguingly, the passive viewing of uninformative number symbols can shift visuo-spatial attention to different target locations according to the number magnitude, i.e. small/large numbers facilitate processing of left/right targets, respectively. The brain architecture dedicated to these attention shifts associated with numbers currently remains unknown. Evoked potential recordings indicate that both early and late stages are involved in this spatio-numerical interaction, but the neuro-functional anatomy needs to be specified. Here we use, for the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate attentional orienting following uninformative Arabic digits. We show that BOLD response in occipital visual regions was modulated by the congruency between digit magnitude (small/large) and target side (left/right). Additionally, we report higher BOLD responses following large (8, 9) compared to small (1, 2) digits in two bilateral parietal regions, yielding a significant effect of digit magnitude. We propose and discuss the view that automatic encoding of semantic representations related to number symbols in parietal cortex lead to shifts in visuo-spatial attention and enhanced visual processing in the occipital cortex according to number-space congruency rules. [less ▲]

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See detailLocal discriminability determines the strength of holistic processing for faces in the fusiform face area.
Goffaux, Valerie; Schiltz, Christine UL; Mur, Marieke et al

in Frontiers in psychology (2012), 3

Recent evidence suggests that the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) is not exclusively dedicated to the interactive processing of face features, but also contains neurons sensitive to local features. This suggests ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that the Fusiform Face Area (FFA) is not exclusively dedicated to the interactive processing of face features, but also contains neurons sensitive to local features. This suggests the existence of both interactive and local processing modes, consistent with recent behavioral findings that the strength of interactive feature processing (IFP) engages most strongly when similar features need to be disambiguated. Here we address whether the engagement of the FFA into interactive versus featural representational modes is governed by local feature discriminability. We scanned human participants while they matched target features within face pairs, independently of the context of distracter features. IFP was operationalized as the failure to match the target without being distracted by distracter features. Picture-plane inversion was used to disrupt IFP while preserving input properties. We found that FFA activation was comparably strong, irrespective of whether similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts(i.e., inducing robust IFP) or dissimilar target features were embedded in the same context (i.e., engaging local processing). Second, inversion decreased FFA activation to faces most robustly when similar target features were embedded in dissimilar contexts, indicating that FFA engages into IFP mainly when features cannot be disambiguated at a local level. Third, by means of Spearman rank correlation tests, we show that the local processing of feature differences in the FFA is supported to a large extent by the Occipital Face Area, the Lateral Occipital Complex, and early visual cortex, suggesting that these regions encode the local aspects of face information. The present findings confirm the co-existence of holistic and featural representations in the FFA. Furthermore, they establish FFA as the main contributor to the featural/holistic representational mode switches determined by local discriminability. [less ▲]

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See detailThe horizontal tuning of face perception relies on the processing of intermediate and high spatial frequencies
Goffaux, Valerie; van Zon, Jaap; Schiltz, Christine UL

in Journal of Vision (2011), 11(10), 1-9

It was recently shown that expert face perception relies on the extraction of horizontally oriented visual cues. Pictureplane inversion was found to eliminate horizontal, suggesting that this tuning ... [more ▼]

It was recently shown that expert face perception relies on the extraction of horizontally oriented visual cues. Pictureplane inversion was found to eliminate horizontal, suggesting that this tuning contributes to the specificity of face processing. The present experiments sought to determine the spatial frequency (SF) scales supporting the horizontal tuning of face perception. Participants were instructed to match upright and inverted faces that were filtered both in the frequency and orientation domains. Faces in a pair contained horizontal or vertical ranges of information in low, middle, or high SF (LSF, MSF, or HSF). Our findings confirm that upright (but not inverted) face perception is tuned to horizontal orientation. Horizontal tuning was the most robust in the MSF range, next in the HSF range, and absent in the LSF range. Moreover, face inversion selectively disrupted the ability to process horizontal information in MSF and HSF ranges. This finding was replicated even when task difficulty was equated across orientation and SF at upright orientation. Our findings suggest that upright face perception is tuned to horizontally oriented face information carried by intermediate and high SF bands. They further indicate that inversion alters the sampling of face information both in the orientation and SF domains. [less ▲]

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See detailScrambling horizontal face structure: behavioral and electrophysiogical evidence for a tuning of visual face processing to horizontal information
Goffaux, Valerie; Schiltz, Christine UL; Jacques, Corentin

Poster (2011, August)

Filtering faces to remove all but the horizontal information largely preserves behavioral signatures of face-specific processing, including the face inversion effect (FIE). Conversely, preserving only ... [more ▼]

Filtering faces to remove all but the horizontal information largely preserves behavioral signatures of face-specific processing, including the face inversion effect (FIE). Conversely, preserving only vertical information abolishes this effect. In contrast to previous studies which used filtering, the present studies manipulated orientation content of face images by randomizing Fourier phase spectrum in a narrow horizontal orientation band (H-randomization) or vertical orientation band (V-randomization). Phase-randomization was performed on face images in which spatial frequency amplitude spectrum (SF-AS) was either left unaltered or equalized across all SF orientations. We further investigated the time course of horizontal tuning using event-related potentials (ERP). We observed that (i) upright faces were best discriminated when the horizontal structure was preserved (ie V-randomization) compared to H-randomization; (ii) this phase-randomization effect was eliminated by inversion, resulting in (iii) a smaller FIE for H-randomized than V-randomized faces. This pattern was still present but was less consistent when SF-AS was equalized across SF orientations, suggesting that SF-AS in horizontal orientation contributes to the horizontal tuning of face perception. ERP evidence of horizontal tuning for upright face processing was observed in the N170 time-window, a well-known face-sensitive electrophysiological component. The N170 was delayed for H-randomized compared to V-randomized faces. Additionally, and in line with behavioural data, face inversion increased N170 latency to a smaller extent for H-randomized compared to V-randomized. Altogether, our findings indicate that horizontal tuning is a robust property of face perception that arises early in high-level visual cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailScrambling horizontal face structure: behavioral and electrophysiogical evidence for a tuning of visual face processing to horizontal information
Jacques, Corentin; Schiltz, Christine UL; Collet, Kevin et al

Poster (2011, May)

Recent psychophysical evidence indicates that a central feature of human face processing is its tuning to horizontally-oriented information. Specifically, filtering faces to remove all but the horizontal ... [more ▼]

Recent psychophysical evidence indicates that a central feature of human face processing is its tuning to horizontally-oriented information. Specifically, filtering faces to remove all but the horizontal information largely preserves behavioral signatures of face-specific processing, including the face inversion effect (FIE). Conversely, preserving only vertical information abolishes these effects. The purpose of the present experiments was twofold. First, in contrast to previous studies which used filtering, we manipulated orientation content of face images by randomizing Fourier phase spectrum in a narrow horizontal orientation band (H-randomization) or vertical orientation band (V-randomization). Phase-randomization was performed on face images in which spatial frequency amplitude spectrum (SF-AS) was either left unaltered or equalized across all SF orientations. Second, we investigated the time course of tuning to horizontal information using event-related potentials (ERP). Picture-plane inversion was used to evaluate whether the effects of orientation of phase-randomization arise due to inherent stimulus properties or to face-specific perceptual biases. In two psychophysics experiments, we observed that (1) upright faces were best discriminated when the horizontal structure was preserved (i.e. V-randomization) compared to H-randomization. (2) This phase-randomization effect was eliminated by inversion, resulting in (3) a smaller FIE for H-randomized than V-randomized faces. Although this pattern was still present when SF-AS was equalized across SF orientations, it was less consistent, suggesting that SF-AS in horizontal orientation contributes to the horizontal tuning of face perception. Consistent ERP evidence of horizontal tuning for upright face processing was observed in the N170 time-window, a well-known face-sensitive electrophysiological component. The N170 was delayed for H-randomized compared to V-randomized faces. Additionally, and in line with behavioural data, face inversion increased N170 latency to a smaller extent for H-randomized compared to V-randomized faces. Altogether, our findings indicate that horizontal tuning is a robust property of face perception that arises early in high-level visual cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of Spatial Frequency and Orientation to upright and inverted face perception
Goffaux, Valerie; Van Zon, Jaap; Hestermann, Dietmar et al

Poster (2011, May)

It was recently shown that expert face perception relies on the extraction of horizontally oriented visual cues. Picture-plane inversion was found to eliminate horizontal, suggesting that this tuning ... [more ▼]

It was recently shown that expert face perception relies on the extraction of horizontally oriented visual cues. Picture-plane inversion was found to eliminate horizontal, suggesting that this tuning contributes to the specificity of face processing. The present experiments sought to determine the spatial frequency (SF) scales supporting the horizontal tuning of face perception. Participants were instructed to match upright and inverted faces that were filtered both in the frequency and orientation domains. Faces in a pair contained horizontal or vertical ranges of information in low, middle, or high SF (LSF, MSF, or HSF). Our findings confirm that upright (but not inverted) face perception is tuned to horizontal orientation. Horizontal tuning was the most robust in the MSF range, next in the HSF range, and absent in the LSF range. Moreover, face inversion selectively disrupted the ability to process horizontal information in MSF and HSF ranges. This finding was replicated even when task difficulty was equated across orientation and SF at upright orientation. Our findings suggest that upright face perception is tuned to horizontally oriented face information carried by intermediate and high SF bands. They further indicate that inversion alters the sampling of face information both in the orientation and SF domains. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen numbers act as attentional cues: behavioral and fMRI investigations
Goffaux, Valerie; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Poster (2011, February 11)

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See detailFrom coarse to fine? Spatial and temporal dynamics of cortical face processing
Goffaux, Valerie; Peters, Judith; Haubrechts, Julie et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2011), 21(2), 467-476

Primary vision segregates information along 2 main dimensions: orientation and spatial frequency (SF). An important question is how this primary visual information is integrated to support high level ... [more ▼]

Primary vision segregates information along 2 main dimensions: orientation and spatial frequency (SF). An important question is how this primary visual information is integrated to support high level representations. It is generally assumed that the information carried by different SF is combined following a coarse-to-fine sequence. We directly addressed this assumption by investigating how the network of face-preferring cortical regions processes distinct SF over time. Face stimuli were flashed during 75, 150, or 300 ms and masked. They were filtered to preserve low SF (LSF), middle SF (MSF), or high SF (HSF). Most face-preferring regions robustly responded to coarse LSF, face information in early stages of visual processing (i.e., until 75 ms of exposure duration). LSF processing decayed as a function of exposure duration (mostly until 150 ms). In contrast, the processing of fine HSF, face information became more robust over time in the bilateral fusiform face regions and in the right occipital face area. The present evidence suggests the coarse-to-fine strategy as a plausible modus operandi in high level visual cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailFacilitation and inhibition of return using numbers as attentional cues
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2011)

Behavioural studies have shown a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). Fischer and colleagues (2003) showed that digits can act as central spatial cues in a target detection task ... [more ▼]

Behavioural studies have shown a relation between numbers and space (DeHevia et al., 2008). Fischer and colleagues (2003) showed that digits can act as central spatial cues in a target detection task, resulting in shorter reaction times (RT) for left-sided targets when preceded by small numbers and for right-sided targets when preceded by large numbers. This facilitation effect indicates that numbers orient visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield, depending on their magnitude. To date no studies investigated whether this facilitation is followed by inhibition of return at longer intervals, as could be expected with visuo-spatial attention shifts. To this aim, we designed an analogous paradigm to Fischer et al.’s, introducing additional longer intervals. Participants (n=25) were presented a task irrelevant digit (1,2 vs. 8,9) for 400ms and had to detect a brief (100ms) lateral target appearing after a variable interval (100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250ms). A 2x6 repeated measures ANOVA of mean RT, with congruency and interval as within-subject variables yielded a significant interaction (F(5,24)=2.3, p<0.05). As expected, targets were detected faster when appearing in the congruent (small-left, large-right) hemifield after 250ms. Using the regression method proposed by Lorch and Myers (1990), the slope at this interval was significantly negative (t(24)=1.70, p=0.05); indicating a facilitation for the detection of targets in the congruent hemifield) (cf. Fischer et al., 2003). At the 1250ms interval, targets were detected significantly slower when they appeared in the congruent compared to the incongruent hemifield (yielding significantly positive slopes at 1250ms: t(24)=2.68, p=0.007). These findings provide the first evidence that digits not only produce facilitation effects at shorter intervals, but also induce inhibitory effects at longer intervals, confirming the visuo-spatial nature of the attention shifts associated with Arabic digits. [less ▲]

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