References of "Glodt, Christian 50001865"
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See detailDesigning Languages using Lightning
Gammaitoni, Loïc UL; Kelsen, Pierre UL; Glodt, Christian UL

in Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGPLAN International Conference on Software Language Engineering (2015)

Modelling languages are defined by specifying their abstract syntax, concrete syntax and semantics. In the Lightning tool the definition of all these language components is based on the lightweight formal ... [more ▼]

Modelling languages are defined by specifying their abstract syntax, concrete syntax and semantics. In the Lightning tool the definition of all these language components is based on the lightweight formal language Alloy. Lightning makes use of the powerful automatic analysis features of Alloy to allow language designers to develop and validate the definition of a modelling language in an incremental fashion. By providing immediate visual feedback, it allows errors in the language definition to be quickly identified and corrected. Furthermore Lightning introduces a novel interpretation mechanism that allows efficient execution of transformations used in the language definition. We illustrate the use of the tool on the language of structured business processes. [less ▲]

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See detailA generic model decomposition technique and its application to the Eclipse modeling framework
Ma, Qin UL; Kelsen, Pierre UL; Glodt, Christian UL

in Software & Systems Modeling (2015), 14(2), 921-952

Model-driven software development aims at easing the process of software development by using models as primary artifacts. Although less complex than the real systems they are based on, models tend to be ... [more ▼]

Model-driven software development aims at easing the process of software development by using models as primary artifacts. Although less complex than the real systems they are based on, models tend to be complex nevertheless, thus making the task of handling them non-trivial in many cases. In this paper we propose a generic model decomposition technique to facilitate model management by decomposing complex models into smaller sub-models that conform to the same metamodel as the original model. The technique is based upon a formal foundation that consists of a formal capturing of the concepts of models, metamodels, and model conformance; a formal constraint language based on EssentialOCL; and a set of formally proved properties of the technique. We organize the decomposed sub-models in a mathematical structure as a lattice, and design a linear-time algorithm for constructing this decomposition. The generic model decomposition technique is applied to the Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF) and the result is used to build a solution to a specific model comprehension problem of Ecore models based upon model pruning. We report two case studies of the model comprehension method: one in BPMN and the other in fUML. [less ▲]

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See detailCombining Models with Code: a Tale of Two Languages
Qin, Ma; Schmit, Sam; Glodt, Christian UL et al

in IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineeering Workshops (2014)

In the pure model-driven view of software engineering, models are the sole artifacts to be created and maintained and executable source code is entirely generated from the models. However, due to the ... [more ▼]

In the pure model-driven view of software engineering, models are the sole artifacts to be created and maintained and executable source code is entirely generated from the models. However, due to the variety of modern platforms and the complexity of capturing them correctly in models, this vision has not yet been fully realized. In this paper, we propose an approach that allows combining high-level models with low-level code into an executable system. The approach is based on two modeling languages, one presenting a common abstraction of modeling and programming languages, and the other allowing to express the bridge between the model and code. We illustrate our approach using a running example of an invoicing system for which the business logic requirements are captured by an executable model and the requirements on the graphical user interface are directly mocked up using a GUI designer tool that generates Java code. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomated Generation of Platform-Variant Applications from Platform-Independent Models via Templates
Amalio, Nuno UL; Glodt, Christian UL; Pinto, Frederico et al

in Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science (2011), 279(3), 3-25

Model-driven development raises the level of abstraction so that software engineers can focus on design rather than implementation and platform-specific details. This paper presents a model-centric ... [more ▼]

Model-driven development raises the level of abstraction so that software engineers can focus on design rather than implementation and platform-specific details. This paper presents a model-centric approach to MDD, where platform code is generated from a platform-independent model describing platform-variant families of products. The generation is done via templates; the variation point lies in the alternative execution platforms. Our approach is based on EP, a formal executable modelling language, supplemented with OCL, and FTL, a formal language of templates. The paper illustrates the approach by generating applications from the same abstract model that run on both Googleâ Android and Apple iPhone mobile platforms. The paper contribution are: (a) it realises the MDD approach using formal languages, in particular the use of a formal language of templates and (b) it illustrates the approach by generating code for two distinct platforms. [less ▲]

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See detailModels within Models: Taming Model Complexity Using the Sub-model Lattice
Kelsen, Pierre UL; Ma, Qin UL; Glodt, Christian UL

in 14th International Conference on Fundamental Approaches to Software Engineering (FASE 2011) (2011)

Model-driven software development aims at easing the process of software development by using models as primary artifacts. Although less complex than the real systems they are based on, models tend to be ... [more ▼]

Model-driven software development aims at easing the process of software development by using models as primary artifacts. Although less complex than the real systems they are based on, models tend to be complex nevertheless, thus making the task of comprehending them non-trivial in many cases. In this paper we propose a technique for model comprehension based on decomposing models into sub-models that conform to the same metamodel as the original model. The main contributions of this paper are: a mathematical description of the structure of these sub-models as a lattice, a linear-time algorithm for constructing this decomposition and finally an application of our decomposition technique to model comprehension. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding VCL Models and Automatically Generating Z Specifications from Them
Amalio, Nuno UL; Glodt, Christian UL; Kelsen, Pierre UL

in Formal Methods - 17th International Symposium on Formal Methods (2011)

VCL is a visual and formal language for abstract specification of software systems. Its novelty lies in its capacity to describe predicates visually. This paper presents work-in-progress on a tool for VCL ... [more ▼]

VCL is a visual and formal language for abstract specification of software systems. Its novelty lies in its capacity to describe predicates visually. This paper presents work-in-progress on a tool for VCL; the tool version presented here supports the VCL notations of structural and assertion diagrams (a subset of the whole VCL suite), enabling the generation of Z specifications from them. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing VCL as an Aspect-Oriented Approach to Requirements Modelling
Amalio, Nuno UL; Kelsen, Pierre UL; Ma, Qin UL et al

in Transactions on Aspect-Oriented Software Development (2010), 7

Software systems are becoming larger and more complex. By tackling the modularisation of crosscutting concerns, aspect-orientation draws attention to modularity as a means to address the problems of ... [more ▼]

Software systems are becoming larger and more complex. By tackling the modularisation of crosscutting concerns, aspect-orientation draws attention to modularity as a means to address the problems of scalability, complexity and evolution in software systems development. Aspect-oriented modelling (AOM) applies aspect-orientation to the construction of models. Most existing AOM approaches are designed without a formal semantics, and use multi-view partial descriptions of behaviour. This paper presents an AOM approach based on the Visual Contract Language (VCL): a visual language for abstract and precise modelling, designed with a formal semantics, and comprising a novel approach to visual behavioural modelling based on design by contract where behavioural descriptions are total. By applying VCL to a large case study of a car-crash crisis management system, the paper demonstrates how modularity of VCL's constructs, at different levels of granularity, help to tackle complexity. In particular, it shows how VCL's package construct and its associated composition mechanisms are key in supporting separation of concerns, coarse-grained problem decomposition and aspect-orientation. The case study's modelling solution has a clear and well-defined modular structure; the backbone of this structure is a collection of packages encapsulating local solutions to concerns. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom Platform-Independent to Platform-Specific Models using Democles
Glodt, Christian UL; Kelsen, Pierre UL; Amalio, Nuno UL et al

in International Conference on Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (2 UL)