References of "Gharabaghi, A"
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See detailNeuromuscular correlates of subthalamic stimulation and upper limb freezing in Parkinson's disease.
Scholten, M.; Klotz, R.; Plewnia, C. et al

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2016)

OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiology of deep brain stimulation mechanisms and resistant freezing phenomena in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) remains incompletely understood. Further studies on the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiology of deep brain stimulation mechanisms and resistant freezing phenomena in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (iPD) remains incompletely understood. Further studies on the neuromuscular substrates are needed. METHODS: We analyzed 16 patients with advanced iPD and bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation, and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients were tested after overnight withdrawal of medication with 'stimulation off' (StimOff) and 'stimulation on' (StimOn). Subjects performed continuous tapping of the right index finger with simultaneous recordings of biomechanical registration, EMG of finger flexors and extensors, and EEG. First, we analyzed EEG and EMG spectral measures comparing StimOff with healthy controls and StimOff with StimOn (irrespective of freezing). Second, we contrasted 'regular (unimpaired) tapping' and 'freezing' resistant to subthalamic neurostimulation as obtained in StimOn. RESULTS: iPD showed increased intermuscular coherence around 8Hz in StimOff that was reduced in StimOn. This 8Hz muscular activity was not coherent to cortical activity. 'Freezing' episodes showed increased muscle activity of finger flexors and extensors at 6-9Hz, and increased cortical activity at 7-11Hz. During transition from regular tapping to 'freezing' the cortical activity first increased over the left sensorimotor area followed by a spread to the left frontal and right parietal areas. CONCLUSIONS: We identified neuromuscular motor network features of subthalamic neurostimulation therapy and resistant upper limb freezing that point to increased low-frequency muscular and cortical activity. SIGNIFICANCE: Together, our findings demonstrate several motor network abnormalities associated with upper limb freezing that may translate into future research on freezing of gait in iPD. [less ▲]

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See detailAlpha-synuclein gene variants may predict neurostimulation outcome.
Weiss, D.; Herrmann, S.; Wang, Lin UL et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2016)

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See detailCortical correlates of susceptibility to upper limb freezing in Parkinson's disease.
Scholten, M.; Govindan, R. B.; Braun, C. et al

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2016), 127(6), 2386-93

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See detailLong-term outcome of deep brain stimulation in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
Weiss, D.; Mielke, C.; Wachter, T. et al

in Parkinsonism & related disorders (2015), 21(3), 310-313

INTRODUCTION: Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) presents as complex movement disorder including tremor and cerebellar ataxia. The efficacy and safety of deep brain stimulation of the ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) presents as complex movement disorder including tremor and cerebellar ataxia. The efficacy and safety of deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius of the thalamus in atypical tremor syndromes like FXTAS remains to be determined. METHODS: Here, we report the long-term outcome of three male genetically confirmed FXTAS patients treated with bilateral neurostimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius for up to four years. RESULTS: All patients demonstrated sustained improvement of both tremor and ataxia - the latter included improvement of intention tremor and axial tremor. Kinematic gait analyses further demonstrated a regularization of the gait cycle. Initial improvements of hand functional disability were not sustained and reached the preoperative level of impairment within one to two years from surgery. CONCLUSION: Our data on patients with a genetic cause of tremor show favorable outcome and may contribute to improved patient stratification for neurostimulation therapy in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailSubthalamic stimulation modulates cortical motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease
Weiss, D.; Klotz, R.; Govindan, R. B. et al

in Brain : a journal of neurology (2015), 138(Pt 3), 679-93

Dynamic modulations of large-scale network activity and synchronization are inherent to a broad spectrum of cognitive processes and are disturbed in neuropsychiatric conditions including Parkinson's ... [more ▼]

Dynamic modulations of large-scale network activity and synchronization are inherent to a broad spectrum of cognitive processes and are disturbed in neuropsychiatric conditions including Parkinson's disease. Here, we set out to address the motor network activity and synchronization in Parkinson's disease and its modulation with subthalamic stimulation. To this end, 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease with subthalamic nucleus stimulation were analysed on externally cued right hand finger movements with 1.5-s interstimulus interval. Simultaneous recordings were obtained from electromyography on antagonistic muscles (right flexor digitorum and extensor digitorum) together with 64-channel electroencephalography. Time-frequency event-related spectral perturbations were assessed to determine cortical and muscular activity. Next, cross-spectra in the time-frequency domain were analysed to explore the cortico-cortical synchronization. The time-frequency modulations enabled us to select a time-frequency range relevant for motor processing. On these time-frequency windows, we developed an extension of the phase synchronization index to quantify the global cortico-cortical synchronization and to obtain topographic differentiations of distinct electrode sites with respect to their contributions to the global phase synchronization index. The spectral measures were used to predict clinical and reaction time outcome using regression analysis. We found that movement-related desynchronization of cortical activity in the upper alpha and beta range was significantly facilitated with 'stimulation on' compared to 'stimulation off' on electrodes over the bilateral parietal, sensorimotor, premotor, supplementary-motor, and prefrontal areas, including the bilateral inferior prefrontal areas. These spectral modulations enabled us to predict both clinical and reaction time improvement from subthalamic stimulation. With 'stimulation on', interhemispheric cortico-cortical coherence in the beta band was significantly attenuated over the bilateral sensorimotor areas. Similarly, the global cortico-cortical phase synchronization was attenuated, and the topographic differentiation revealed stronger desynchronization over the (ipsilateral) right-hemispheric prefrontal, premotor and sensorimotor areas compared to 'stimulation off'. We further demonstrated that the cortico-cortical phase synchronization was largely dominated by genuine neuronal coupling. The clinical improvement with 'stimulation on' compared to 'stimulation off' could be predicted from this cortical decoupling with multiple regressions, and the reduction of synchronization over the right prefrontal area showed a linear univariate correlation with clinical improvement. Our study demonstrates wide-spread activity and synchronization modulations of the cortical motor network, and highlights subthalamic stimulation as a network-modulating therapy. Accordingly, subthalamic stimulation may release bilateral cortical computational resources by facilitating movement-related desynchronization. Moreover, the subthalamic nucleus is critical to balance inhibitory and facilitatory cortical players within the motor program. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurostimulation for Parkinson's disease with early motor complications.
Schuepbach, W. M. M.; Rau, J.; Knudsen, K. et al

in The New England journal of medicine (2013), 368(7), 610-22

BACKGROUND: Subthalamic stimulation reduces motor disability and improves quality of life in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who have severe levodopa-induced motor complications. We ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Subthalamic stimulation reduces motor disability and improves quality of life in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who have severe levodopa-induced motor complications. We hypothesized that neurostimulation would be beneficial at an earlier stage of Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In this 2-year trial, we randomly assigned 251 patients with Parkinson's disease and early motor complications (mean age, 52 years; mean duration of disease, 7.5 years) to undergo neurostimulation plus medical therapy or medical therapy alone. The primary end point was quality of life, as assessed with the use of the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) summary index (with scores ranging from 0 to 100 and higher scores indicating worse function). Major secondary outcomes included parkinsonian motor disability, activities of daily living, levodopa-induced motor complications (as assessed with the use of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, parts III, II, and IV, respectively), and time with good mobility and no dyskinesia. RESULTS: For the primary outcome of quality of life, the mean score for the neurostimulation group improved by 7.8 points, and that for the medical-therapy group worsened by 0.2 points (between-group difference in mean change from baseline to 2 years, 8.0 points; P=0.002). Neurostimulation was superior to medical therapy with respect to motor disability (P<0.001), activities of daily living (P<0.001), levodopa-induced motor complications (P<0.001), and time with good mobility and no dyskinesia (P=0.01). Serious adverse events occurred in 54.8% of the patients in the neurostimulation group and in 44.1% of those in the medical-therapy group. Serious adverse events related to surgical implantation or the neurostimulation device occurred in 17.7% of patients. An expert panel confirmed that medical therapy was consistent with practice guidelines for 96.8% of the patients in the neurostimulation group and for 94.5% of those in the medical-therapy group. CONCLUSIONS: Subthalamic stimulation was superior to medical therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease and early motor complications. (Funded by the German Ministry of Research and others; EARLYSTIM ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00354133.). [less ▲]

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See detailSuppression of extrapyramidal side effects of doxepin by thalamic deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome.
Rzesnitzek, L.; Wachter, T.; Krüger, Rejko UL et al

in Neurology (2011), 77(18), 1708-9

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