References of "Främling, Kary"
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See detailData Exchange Interoperability in IoT Ecosystem for Smart Parking and EV Charging
Karpenko, Anastasiia; Kinnunen, Tuomas; Madhikermi, Manik et al

in Sensors (2018)

Many domains are trying to integrate with the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem, such as public administrations starting smart city initiatives all over the world. Cities are becoming smart in many ways ... [more ▼]

Many domains are trying to integrate with the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem, such as public administrations starting smart city initiatives all over the world. Cities are becoming smart in many ways: smart mobility, smart buildings, smart environment and so on. However, the problem of non-interoperability in the IoT hinders the seamless communication between all kinds of IoT devices. Different domain specific IoT applications use different interoperability standards. These standards are usually not interoperable with each other. IoT applications and ecosystems therefore tend to use a vertical communication model that does not allow data sharing horizontally across different IoT ecosystems. In 2014, The Open Group published two domain-independent IoT messaging standards, O-MI and O-DF, aiming to solve the interoperability problem. In this article we describe the practical use of O-MI/O-DF standards for reaching interoperability in a mobile application for the smart city context, in particular for the Smart Mobility domain, electric vehicle (EV) charging case study. The proof-of-concept of the smart EV charging ecosystem with mobile application user interface was developed as a part of an EU (Horizon 2020) Project bIoTope. [less ▲]

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See detailOpen IoT Ecosystem for Sporting Event Management
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Robert, Jérémy UL; Främling, Kary et al

in IEEE Access (2017), 5(1), 7064-7079

By connecting devices, people, vehicles, and infrastructures everywhere in a city, governments and their partners can improve community well-being and other economic and financial aspects (e.g., cost and ... [more ▼]

By connecting devices, people, vehicles, and infrastructures everywhere in a city, governments and their partners can improve community well-being and other economic and financial aspects (e.g., cost and energy savings). Nonetheless, smart cities are complex ecosystems that comprise many different stakeholders (network operators, managed service providers, logistic centers, and so on), who must work together to provide the best services and unlock the commercial potential of the so-called Internet of Things (IoT). This is one of the major challenges that faces today’s smart city movement, and the emerging "API economy." Indeed, while new smart connected objects hit the market every day, they mostly feed "vertical silos" (e.g., vertical apps, siloed apps, and so on) that are closed to the rest of the IoT, thus hampering developers to produce new added value across multiple platforms and/or application domains. Within this context, the contribution of this paper is twofold: 1) present the strategic vision and ambition of the EU to overcome this critical vertical silos’ issue and 2) introduce the first building blocks underlying an open IoT ecosystem developed as part of an EU (Horizon 2020) Project and a joint project initiative (IoT-EPI). The practicability of this ecosystem, along with a performance analysis, is carried out considering a proof-of-concept for enhanced sporting event management in the context of the forthcoming FIFA World Cup 2022 in Qatar. [less ▲]

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See detailIoT-based Smart Parking System for Sporting Event Management
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Robert, Jérémy UL; Hefnawy, Ahmed et al

in Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking and Services (2016, December 01)

By connecting devices, people, vehicles and infrastructures everywhere in a city, governments and their partners can improve community wellbeing and other economic and financial aspects (e.g., cost and ... [more ▼]

By connecting devices, people, vehicles and infrastructures everywhere in a city, governments and their partners can improve community wellbeing and other economic and financial aspects (e.g., cost and energy savings). Nonetheless, smart cities are complex ecosystems that comprise many different stakeholders (network operators, managed service providers, logistic centers...) who must work together to provide the best services and unlock the commercial potential of the IoT. This is one of the major challenges that faces today's smart city movement, and more generally the IoT as a whole. Indeed, while new smart connected objects hit the market every day, they mostly feed "vertical silos" (e.g., vertical apps, siloed apps...) that are closed to the rest of the IoT, thus hampering developers to produce new added value across multiple platforms. Within this context, the contribution of this paper is twofold: (i) present the EU vision and ongoing activities to overcome the problem of vertical silos; (ii) introduce recent IoT standards used as part of a recent Horizon 2020 IoT project to address this problem. The implementation of those standards for enhanced sporting event management in a smart city/government context (FIFA World Cup 2022) is developed, presented, and evaluated as a proof-of-concept. [less ▲]

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See detailLifecycle Management in the Smart City Context: Smart Parking Use-Case
Hefnawy, Ahmed; Elhariri, Taha; Bouras, Abdelaziz et al

in 13th IFIP International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management, Columbia SC 10-13 July 2016 (2016, July 13)

Lifecycle management enables enterprises to manage their products, services and product-service bundles. IoT and CPS have made products and services smarter by closing the loop of data across different ... [more ▼]

Lifecycle management enables enterprises to manage their products, services and product-service bundles. IoT and CPS have made products and services smarter by closing the loop of data across different phases of lifecycle. Similarly, CPS and IoT empower cities with real-time data streams from heterogeneous objects. Yet, cities are smarter and more powerful when relevant data can be exchanged between different systems across different domains. From engineering perspective, smart city can be seen as a System of Systems composed of interrelated/ interdependent smart systems and objects. To better integrate people, processes, and systems in the smart city ecosystem, this paper discusses the use of Lifecycle Management in the smart city context. Considering the differences between ordinary and smart service systems, this paper seeks better understanding of lifecycle aspects in the smart city context. For better understanding, some of the discussed lifecycle aspects are demonstrated in a smart parking use-case. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding Lifecycle Management System for Enhanced Closed Loop Collaboration
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Buda, Andrea; Robert, Jérémy UL et al

in 13th IFIP International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management (PLM16) (2016, June 29)

In the past few years, the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry has carried out efforts to develop BIM (Building Information Modelling) facilitating tools and standards for enhanced ... [more ▼]

In the past few years, the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry has carried out efforts to develop BIM (Building Information Modelling) facilitating tools and standards for enhanced collaborative working and information sharing. Lessons learnt from other industries and tools such as PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) – established tool in manufacturing to manage the engineering change process – revealed interesting potential to manage more efficiently the building design and construction processes. Nonetheless, one of the remaining challenges consists in closing the information loop between multiple building lifecycle phases, e.g. by capturing information from middle-of-life processes (i.e., use and maintenance) to re-use it in end-of-life processes (e.g., to guide disposal decision making). Our research addresses this lack of closed-loop system in the AEC industry by proposing an open and interoperable Web-based building lifecycle management system. This paper gives (i) an overview of the requirement engineering process that has been set up to integrate efforts, standards and directives of both the AEC and PLM industries, and (ii) first proofs-of-concept of our system implemented on two distinct campus. [less ▲]

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See detailData Quality Assessment of Maintenance Reporting Procedures
Madhikermi, Manik; Kubler, Sylvain UL; Robert, Jérémy UL et al

in Expert Systems with Applications (2016)

Today’s largest and fastest growing companies’ assets are no longer physical, but rather digital (software, algorithms...). This is all the more true in the manufacturing, and particularly in the ... [more ▼]

Today’s largest and fastest growing companies’ assets are no longer physical, but rather digital (software, algorithms...). This is all the more true in the manufacturing, and particularly in the maintenance sector where quality of enterprise maintenance services are closely linked to the quality of maintenance data reporting procedures. If quality of the reported data is too low, it can results in wrong decision-making and loss of money. Furthermore, various maintenance experts are involved and directly concerned about the quality of enterprises’ daily maintenance data reporting (e.g., maintenance planners, plant managers...), each one having specific needs and responsibilities. To address this Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) problem, and since data quality is hardly considered in existing expert maintenance systems, this paper develops a Maintenance Reporting Quality Assessment (MRQA) dashboard that enables any company stakeholder to easily – and in real-time – assess/rank company branch offices in terms of maintenance reporting quality. From a theoretical standpoint, AHP is used to integrate various data quality dimensions as well as expert preferences. A use case describes how the proposed MRQA dashboard is being used by a Finnish multinational equipment manufacturer to assess and enhance reporting practices in a specific or a group of branch offices. [less ▲]

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See detailIoT Platforms Initiative
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Främling, Kary; Zaslavsky, Arkady

in Vermesan, Ovidiu; Friess, Peter (Eds.) Digitising the Industry Internet of Things Connecting the Physical, Digital and Virtual Worlds (2016)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is considered to be one of the enablers of the next industrial revolution. It is fuelled by the advancement of digital technologies, as well as dramatically changing how ... [more ▼]

The Internet of Things (IoT) is considered to be one of the enablers of the next industrial revolution. It is fuelled by the advancement of digital technologies, as well as dramatically changing how companies engage in business activities and people interact with their environment. The IoT’s disruptive nature requires the assessment of the requirements for its future deployment across the digital value chain in various industries and many application areas. The IoT is bridging the physical, digital, cyber and virtual worlds and requires sound information processing capabilities for the “digital shadows” of these real things. IoT applications are gradually moving from vertical, single- purpose solutions to multi-purpose and collaborative applications interacting across industry verticals, organizations and people, which represents one of the essential paradigms of the digital economy. Many of those applications still have to be identified, while involvement of end users in this innovation is crucial. IoT technologies are key enablers of the Digital Single Market (DSM), which will have a potentially significant impact on the creation of jobs and growth, along with providing opportunities for IoT stakeholders in deploying and commercializing IoT technologies and applications within European and global markets. The following chapters will provide insights into the state of the art for research and innovation regarding the IoT, while exposing you to the challenges and opportunities within future IoT ecosystems, which address IoT technology as well as applications developments and deployments for various domains (consumer/business/industrial/art). [less ▲]

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See detailOpportunities for enhanced lean construction management using Internet of Things standards
Dave, Bhargav; Kubler, Sylvain UL; Främling, Kary et al

in Automation in Construction (2016), 61

Traditionally, production control on construction sites has been challenging, and still remains challenging. The ad-hoc production control methods that are usually used, most of which are informal, foster ... [more ▼]

Traditionally, production control on construction sites has been challenging, and still remains challenging. The ad-hoc production control methods that are usually used, most of which are informal, foster uncertainty that prevents smooth production flow. Lean construction methods such as the Last Planner System have partially tackled this problem by involving site teams into the decision making process and having them report back to the production management system. However, such systems have relatively long “lookahead” planning cycles to respond to the dynamic production requirements of construction, where daily, if not hourly control is needed. New solutions have been proposed such as VisiLean, KanBIM, etc., but again these types of construction management systems require the proximity and availability of computer devices to workers. Through this paper, the authors investigate how the communication framework underlying such construction management systems can be further improved so as to fully or partially automate various communication functions across the construction project lifecycle (e.g., to enable lean and close to real-time reporting of production control information). To this end, the present paper provides evidences of how the Internet of Things (IoT) and related standards can contribute to such an improvement. The paper then provides first insights – through various construction scenarios – into how the proposed communication framework can be beneficial for various actors and core business perspectives, from lean construction management to the management of the entire building lifecycle. [less ▲]

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See detailO-MI/O-DF Standards as Interoperability Enablers for Industrial Internet: a Performance Analysis
Robert, Jérémy UL; Kubler, Sylvain UL; Le Traon, Yves UL et al

in O-MI/O-DF Standards as Interoperability Enablers for Industrial Internet: a Performance Analysis (2016)

The Industrial Internet should provide means to create ad hoc and loosely coupled information flows between objects, users, services, and business domain systems. However, today’s technologies and ... [more ▼]

The Industrial Internet should provide means to create ad hoc and loosely coupled information flows between objects, users, services, and business domain systems. However, today’s technologies and products often feed ‘vertical silos’ (e.g., vertical/siloed apps), which inevitably result in multiple and non-interoperable systems. Standardization will play an ever-increasing part in enabling information to flow between such vertically-oriented closed systems. This paper presents recent IoT messaging standards, notably O-MI (Open Messaging Interface) and O-DF (Open Data Format), whose initial requirements were defined for enhanced collaboration and interoperability in product lifecycle management. A first analytical model of the minimal traffic load (in bytes) to fulfil the required/basic standard specifications is then proposed. A smart maintenance use case relying on the first version of the standard reference implementation is developed, based on which our analytical model is applied to evaluate the degree of deviation (w.r.t. the standard specifications) of this reference implementation. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnological Theory of Cloud Manufacturing
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Holmström, Jan; Främling, Kary et al

in Borangiu, Theodor (Ed.) Service Orientation in Holonic and Multi Agent Manufacturing and Robotics (2015, November 06)

Over the past decade, a flourishing number of concepts and architectural shifts appeared such as the Internet of Things, Industry 4.0, Big Data, 3D printing, etc. Such concepts are reshaping traditional ... [more ▼]

Over the past decade, a flourishing number of concepts and architectural shifts appeared such as the Internet of Things, Industry 4.0, Big Data, 3D printing, etc. Such concepts are reshaping traditional manufacturing models, which become increasingly network-, service- and intelligent manufacturing-oriented. It sometimes becomes difficult to have a clear vision of how all those concepts are interwoven and what benefits they bring to the global picture (either from a service or business perspective). This paper traces the evolution of the manufacturing paradigms, highlighting the recent shift towards Cloud Manufacturing (CMfg), along with a taxonomy of the technological concepts and technologies underlying CMfg. [less ▲]

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See detailOpportunity to Leverage Information-as-an-Asset in the IoT -- The road ahead
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Yoo, Min-Jung; Cassagnes, Cyril UL et al

in 3rd International Conference on Future Internet of Things and Cloud (2015, August 24)

In traditional product companies, creating value meant identifying enduring customer needs and manufacturing well-engineered solutions. Two hundred and fifty years after the start of the Industrial ... [more ▼]

In traditional product companies, creating value meant identifying enduring customer needs and manufacturing well-engineered solutions. Two hundred and fifty years after the start of the Industrial Revolution, this pattern of activity plays out every day, especially in a connected world where products are no longer one-and-done. Making money is not anymore limited to physical product sales and other revenue streams become possible after the initial product sale, which are service-based information and knowledge in today's IoT (including subscriptions and apps, new analytics for cognitive capabilities...). While information and knowledge are the "new oil" of the IoT era, it nonetheless remains challenging to perceive and extract the real value of those assets, as information is not as tangible and concrete as physical assets. In this respect, this paper introduces the major "laws of information" and discusses how these laws can be leveraged to their full extend thanks to the IoT possibilities. Further, the paper discusses the key challenges that remain to be addressed in today's IoT to concretize such laws. Finally, a set of real-life business use cases identified by the Open Platform 3.0TM Forum are presented from the information law perspectives. [less ▲]

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See detailData Quality Assessment of Company's Maintenance Reporting: A Case Study
Madhikermi, Manik; Kubler, Sylvain UL; Buda, Andrea et al

in Proceedings of 4th International Conference on Data Management Technologies and Applications (2015, July)

Businesses are increasingly using their enterprise data for strategic decision-making activities. In fact, information, derived from data, has become one of the most important tools for businesses to gain ... [more ▼]

Businesses are increasingly using their enterprise data for strategic decision-making activities. In fact, information, derived from data, has become one of the most important tools for businesses to gain competitive edge. Data quality assessment has become a hot topic in numerous sectors and considerable research has been carried out in this respect, although most of the existing frameworks often need to be adapted with respect to the use case needs and features. Within this context, this paper develops a methodology for assessing the quality of enterprises’ daily maintenance reporting, relying both on an existing data quality framework and on a Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) technique. Our methodology is applied in cooperation with a Finnish multinational company in order to evaluate and rank different company sites/office branches (carrying out maintenance activities) according to the quality of their data reporting. Based on this evaluation, the industrial partner wants to establish new action plans for enhanced reporting practices. [less ▲]

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See detailData supply chain in Industrial Internet
Buda, Andrea; Kubler, Sylvain UL; Främling, Kary et al

in 11th IEEE World Conference on Factory Communication Systems (2015, May)

The Industrial Internet promises to radically change and improve many industry's daily business activities, from simple data collection and processing to context-driven, intelligent and pro-active support ... [more ▼]

The Industrial Internet promises to radically change and improve many industry's daily business activities, from simple data collection and processing to context-driven, intelligent and pro-active support of workers’ everyday tasks and life. The present paper first provides insight into a typical industrial internet application architecture, then it highlights one fundamental arising contradiction: "Who owns the data is often not capable of analyzing it". This statement is explained by imaging a visionary data supply chain that would realize some of the Industrial Internet promises. To concretely implement such a system, recent standards published by The Open Group are presented, where we highlight the characteristics that make them suitable for Industrial Internet applications. Finally, we discuss comparable solutions and concludes with new business use cases. [less ▲]

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