References of "Ferring, Dieter 50001784"
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See detailMemory in old age – A life-span perspective
Ferring, Dieter UL

in Wagoner, Brady (Ed.) Oxford Handbook of Culture and Memory (in press)

In this chapter, memory is considered from a life-span perspective combining a geropsychological as well as a life-span developmental view. Characteristics of such a view are This chapter focusses memory ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, memory is considered from a life-span perspective combining a geropsychological as well as a life-span developmental view. Characteristics of such a view are This chapter focusses memory under the perspective of human ageing. It starts with a conception of ageing that highlights the interplay of genetics, life styles and culture as fundamental dynamics underlying the ageing process as well as it’s impact on memory functioning. A second section focuses the context of ontogenesis and describes central concepts of memory structure and functioning in a life span perspective underlining the adaptive function of memory use. Building on this, a third section elaborates the dynamic interplay and the role of memory in the self-regulation of the ageing self. The last section puts memory in the context of two aspects of culture differing between assistive culture providing knowledge and technology resources and culture as representing symbolic resources that help in the collective and individual construction of meaning. [less ▲]

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See detailEnlarging the frame: Issues of inclusion and mental health in an ageing society
Ferring, Dieter UL

in Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities (in press)

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil ... [more ▼]

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil society and social cohesion. Starting point is the observation that the world faces challenges at the start of the 21st century that are new and unprecedented in its history. The four global forces that break all the trends known so far in human history include urbanization, accelerating technological development, greater global connections, and population ageing. The authors first describe the scale of population ageing, as ageing populations characterize several developed economies. In a second step, they highlight some consequences of population ageing for social welfare and in a third part they elaborate on the notion of justice and inclusion in rapidly changing societies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe experience of ageing: Views from without and within
Ferring, Dieter UL

in Rosa, Alberto; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) The Cambridge handbook of socio-cultural psychology (in press)

This chapter contrasts two different views on ageing. An external “view from without” starts in a first step with the description of phenomena associated with human ageing including the notions of death ... [more ▼]

This chapter contrasts two different views on ageing. An external “view from without” starts in a first step with the description of phenomena associated with human ageing including the notions of death and dying. This is followed by presenting an overview of central and mostly psychological models and theories about human ageing. Here, life span conceptions as well as theories on self-regulation of the ageing self are described and discussed. Furthermore, a specific focus is put on the differing qualifications that the term ageing has received in diverse theoretical models. The internal “view from within” finally starts with three case stories presenting excerpts of individual biographic narratives that highlight the importance of life events and adaptive processes within the family in the subjective construction of the self and the life course. The conclusion elaborates a person-centred approach in the study of human ageing taking into account that both family and culture interact in forming development in general as well as life in advancing age in particular. [less ▲]

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See detailWelcome or not? – Natives’ security feelings, attachment and attitudes toward acculturation of immigrants
Goedert, Christine UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL et al

in International Journal of Intercultural Relations (2019), 69

Cultural diversity due to immigration has become a key topic in many societies today. The question of how the native population experiences these developments is of prime importance for intercultural ... [more ▼]

Cultural diversity due to immigration has become a key topic in many societies today. The question of how the native population experiences these developments is of prime importance for intercultural relations and sets the base for acculturation of immigrants. Drawing on attachment and multiculturalism research, we supposed here that general and specific feelings of security might be related to more positive attitudes toward cultural diversity, whereas feelings of threat might be related to less openness. More precisely, the present study investigated how natives’ general attachment (secure or fearful) as well as their specific feelings of (cultural or economic) security might be related to their expectations about acculturation of immigrants in the multicultural context of Luxembourg. The sample included N = 134 Luxembourg nationals with an average age of M = 45.02 (SD = 17.41) who filled out an online questionnaire. Results revealed that self-reported fearful general attachment was positively related to more unwelcoming acculturation orientations. Relations between general attachment and acculturation orientations were mediated by feelings of cultural security, which had strong effects on host nationals’ (un)welcoming acculturation orientations over and above general attachment. Findings suggest that (un)welcoming orientations toward immigrants, entailing openness for cultural contact and exchange, are related to feelings of cultural and economic security which are partly biased by a general secure or fearful attachment. Feelings of security seem thus to provide a secure base for tolerance and openness to cultural diversity which are needed in order to deal successfully with the challenges of today’s multicultural societies. [less ▲]

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See detailNational, European or Cosmopolitan identification? Insights from the heart of Europe
Murdock, Elke UL; Kraus, Xavier; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 04)

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra ... [more ▼]

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra-national or non-national identification among the native population, secondly their stereotypical judgements of EU Member State countries and attitudes towards the European Union and thirdly identify predictors for cosmopolitanism. With a sentence completion task we investigated the reasons for a feeling of belonging to a national entity or lack of it. All 255 participants in our study (Mage = 38.8 SD = 10.7, 59% female) had Luxembourgish citizenship. Forty percent provided a national self-identification (“Luxembourger”), 36% supra-national identification (“European”) and 24% a non-national identification (“cosmopolitan”). These three groups did not differ in terms of stereotypical assessments of the EU Member states regarding warmth and competence (stereotype content model). Yet, when asked about their own assessment of Luxembourg, differences occurred with supra- and non-national identifiers providing significantly lower ratings under the self-rating condition. The three groups differed in their attitude towards the European Union. Low commitment (MEIM subscale), high contact with non-natives and group self-identification predicted cosmopolitanism. There were no effects in terms of self-efficacy, age, gender or socioeconomic status. The content analysis of the sentence completion exercise revealed that affective components dominated arguments for belonging whereas cognitive reasoning governed the statements expressing a lack of belonging. The implications of these findings among natives within the multicultural context of Luxembourg will be discussed – against the rise of nationalism in many European countries and beyond. [less ▲]

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See detailLinks between socio-emotional skills, behaviour, mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Merrell, Christine; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

in European Journal of Psychology of Education (2018)

Young children’s socio-emotional skills are important for understanding their own and other’s behaviours and interactions. No study in Serbia has investigated this before. In this study we explored the ... [more ▼]

Young children’s socio-emotional skills are important for understanding their own and other’s behaviours and interactions. No study in Serbia has investigated this before. In this study we explored the links between early socio-emotional skills, behaviour, and mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia over time. Children (N = 159; 51% of girls) aged 5-8 were rated by the teachers on their socio-emotional skills and behaviour, and their mathematics and literacy assessed at three-time points over 14 months, twice in preschool and once at entry to school. At Time 3, when children entered school, their socio-emotional skills and behaviour were associated with gender, mathematics at Time 1 and their socio-emotional and behaviour ratings at Time 2, controlling for maternal education and literacy at Time 1. Mathematics at Time 3 was associated with mathematics at Time 2, controlling for gender, maternal education, literacy and behaviour at Time 1. No socio-emotional skills or specific behaviour were significant for mathematics. Literacy at Time 3 was associated with mathematics and social skills at Time 1, and literacy at Time 2, controlling for gender and maternal education. At all three times, girls were rated more positively than boys in socio-emotional skills and behaviour, except for adjustment to school setting where there were no differences. This study offers the first insight into the links between socio-emotional skills, behaviour and mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia which will inform the development and evaluation of interventions. Attrition of the sample limits the findings. [less ▲]

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See detailMigrating Identities: Affective Dialogues Across Generations
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Lehmann, Olga V.; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Deep Experiencing - Dialogues within the self (2018)

Dialogical Self Theory recognizes the interaction between self and others. The basic nature of human condition is indeed to be in indefinite and constant interdependence with the existence of “the other” ... [more ▼]

Dialogical Self Theory recognizes the interaction between self and others. The basic nature of human condition is indeed to be in indefinite and constant interdependence with the existence of “the other” and his experiences, thoughts, practices as well as his narrations. Yet, the character and degree of these interdependencies vary and fluctuate depending on the individuals, contexts and cultures. While the external dialogue occurs between people implicated in an overt interaction, the self happens in an individual’s mind as an internal dialogue. Individuals make sense of their lives through the narratives of crucial experiences in their lives, which makes the external dialogue discernible and easier to analyse compared to the internal dialogue not that easily tangible. Though, through an intergenerational interview between an adult daughter and her mother, we will try to assess and identify their individual internal dialogues within their narratives. Hence, to that end body language and behavioural indicators such as face expressions or silent thinking will be used, which may help and serve as guidelines to assess the intergenerational dialogical interaction between mother and adult child in a migrant context. [less ▲]

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See detailCulture in the Act of Caring: Bringing Geropsychology, other gerosciences, and Cultural Psychology together
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

In the introduction of a multidisciplinary book on the role of culture in elder care the editors set the stage for a substantive integration of contributions from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and ... [more ▼]

In the introduction of a multidisciplinary book on the role of culture in elder care the editors set the stage for a substantive integration of contributions from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychology. The authors present arguments for a life-span developmental perspective on care for the elderly and extend this to geropsychology as subsection of life-span developmental psychology. They further emphasize that these disciplines consider to some extent the role of cultural and other contextual factors and that other gerosciences specialized on historical, political, health-and nursing-related aspects of elder care can further supplement this effort. Then three major streams of cultural psychology are mentioned which are particularly relevant to topics of caring: Dialogical Self Theory, Theory of Social Representations, and Cultural Psychology of Semiotic Dynamics. The authors conclude that an increasing population aging and growing gaps between demand and supply of care create a serious practical need for an integration of geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychologies to achieve a better understanding of the individual, interpersonal, and macro social processes involved in elder care. [less ▲]

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See detailCare in aging: Cross-fertilization within and between Geropsychology, other gerosciences, and Cultural Psychology
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

Care for elderly persons is multifaceted and embedded in a rich socio-ecological context of individual, micro-, and macro-social factors. This complexity requires multidisciplinary perspectives to better ... [more ▼]

Care for elderly persons is multifaceted and embedded in a rich socio-ecological context of individual, micro-, and macro-social factors. This complexity requires multidisciplinary perspectives to better understand phenomena of elder care and to act successfully in this field. In the final chapter of a multidisciplinary book with contributions from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychology the editors draw conclusions about major topics, new insights, and further implications for research and practice. The conclusions refer to four domains. First, the macro-social context—including demographic, historical, political, normative, and other cultural factors—opens and limits the available options for individual care giving and receipt and shapes how these issues are experienced by the participants. Second, elder care at the individual and family level is far more complex than previously thought, due to differentiated individual and social care preferences and due to consequences extending beyond single caregivers to multigenerational caring families. Third, processes involved in formal and informal care turned out to be rather differentiated: Understanding, emotional responding, motivation and acting towards suffering, care dependency and caregiver burden are influenced by multiple individual and social level factors. Fourth, future issues of elder care are shaped by macro level factors such as population aging, social trends in job and family life, and technological developments with implications for ensuring care quality, care staff, culturally sensitive care, and assistive technologies. Cultural psychology emerged as a valuable partner of the gerosciences by contributing essentially to a deeper understanding of the aforementioned issues. [less ▲]

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See detailAMBIVALENCE TOWARD PARENTS DURING THE PROCESS OF INDIVIDUATION: Being Caught Between Autonomy and Relatedness?
Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Trans-generational family relations: investigating ambivalences (2018)

The concept of ambivalence has gained considerable research interest in the last years in the study of intergenerational relationships. Lüscher and colleagues (2010) define the experience of ambivalence ... [more ▼]

The concept of ambivalence has gained considerable research interest in the last years in the study of intergenerational relationships. Lüscher and colleagues (2010) define the experience of ambivalence as an oscillation between (temporarily or permanently) irreconcilable, contradictory emotions, thoughts, wishes, and behavioral tendencies that individuals may experience in identity- and agency-relevant social relationships. Such dynamics can include simultaneous conflicting tendencies of “autonomy and dependence,” “freedom and control,” or “closeness and distance” (Lüscher & Hoff, 2013). Because intergenerational family relations are in general relatively close over the whole lifespan and not easily dissolvable, they are—according to these authors—particularly predisposed to experiences of ambivalence. In the present chapter, we concentrate on the link between perceived parental behavior and the experience of ambivalence toward parents in adolescence and emerging adulthood. [less ▲]

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See detailScientific and legal concepts of care dependency: Role for understanding, emotional responding, and acting in the field of elder care
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Boll, Thomas; Ferring, Dieter; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultures of care in aging (2018)

In this chapter, we analyze scientific and legal concepts of care dependency and explore their roles for understanding, emotional responding, and acting of various participants in the field of elder care ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, we analyze scientific and legal concepts of care dependency and explore their roles for understanding, emotional responding, and acting of various participants in the field of elder care. First, two comprehensive concepts from the nursing sciences are contrasted. Then we compare a scientific and two legal concepts (restrictive vs. inclusive) of care dependency from the German long-term care (LTC) system, the last of which regulate older persons´ access to LTC benefits. Here, we consider their different implications for the risk of unmet psychological, social, and temporary care needs. Next, we examine the theoretical and methodological roles of different care dependency concepts for assessment as well as the analysis of prevalence, antecedents, consequences, and the management of care dependency. Following this, we explore possible functions of care dependency concepts as cognitive mediators of various agents’ activities related to elder care, which opens new topics for further research. Among these, we include the ascription of care dependency by various actors, older people´s self-presentation, and family carers´ presentation and LTC administrators´ evaluation of an older person´s care dependency. Further issues addressed are the education of professional care workers and professionals´ provision of elder care. Here, special attention is devoted to the implications of a shift from a restrictive to a more inclusive legal concept of care dependency as recently happened in Germany. Finally, we discuss the implications of inclusive legal concepts of care dependency for the improvement of elder care quality [less ▲]

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See detailCultures of care in aging
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Valsiner, Jaan

Book published by Information Age Publishing (2018)

Care for elderly persons has many facets and is influenced by many factors of the care-dependent person, the care giver(s) and the micro-, and macro-social context. A co-operation of multiple disciplines ... [more ▼]

Care for elderly persons has many facets and is influenced by many factors of the care-dependent person, the care giver(s) and the micro-, and macro-social context. A co-operation of multiple disciplines is required to better understand phenomena of elder care and to act adequately in this field. This is even more urgent given the increasing population aging and the impending gaps between demand and supply of care. The present book provides a first substantive integration of knowledge from geropsychology, other gerosciences, and cultural psychologies to reach these goals —through a multi-disciplinary and international cast of authors. Macro-social context—including demographic, historical, political, normative, and other cultural factors—turned out to open and limit the available options for individual care giving and receipt and shapes how these issues are experienced by the participants in elder care. Elder care is shown to be far more complex than previously thought, because its consequences extend beyond single care givers to multigenerational caring families. Thinking, feeling and acting in relation to care dependency, caregiving and care receipt emerged as being influenced by multiple individual and social level factors. Future issues of elder care are seen as being shaped to a large extent by macro level factors such as population aging, social trends in job and family life, and development of assistive technologies. All this has far reaching implications for ensuring quality of care and the life quality on part of care recipients and care providers and for the coherence of social communities. [less ▲]

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See detailSozialbericht Esch sur Alzette
Heinz, Andreas UL; Dahmen, Clarissa UL; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (12 UL)
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See detailEnlarging the frame: Issues of Inclusion and mental health in an ageing society
Murdock, Elke UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 22)

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil ... [more ▼]

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil society and social cohesion. Our starting point is the observation that the world faces challenges at the start of the 21st century that are new and unprecedented in its history. The four global forces that break all the trends known so far in human history include urbanisation, accelerating technological development, greater global connections, and population ageing (Dobbs, Manyika and Woetzel, 2016). We will first describe the scale of population ageing, as ageing populutions characterize several developed economies. In a second step, we will highlight some consequences of population ageing for social welfare and in a third part I will elaborate on the notion of justice and inclusion in rapidly changing societies. [less ▲]

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See detailBecause I need them, because I don’t: Regulation of family relations between adult children and their parents
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Poster (2017, August)

The world’s demography has evolved requiring policy makers and practitioners all over the world to face in the next years important issues specifically related to the steadily increasing migration. Only ... [more ▼]

The world’s demography has evolved requiring policy makers and practitioners all over the world to face in the next years important issues specifically related to the steadily increasing migration. Only few studies have, however, focused on the regulation of relations between adult children and their ageing parents in host national compared to immigrant families. Migrant families might be confronted with specific tasks. While the acculturation situation might give rise to an increased need for intergenerational support, an acculturation gap between both generations can potentially lead to different expectations. Adult children from immigrant families might, for instance, be subject to the experience of ambivalent or conflictual feelings regarding the desire to become independent from their parents; at the same time, they may feel the urge to conform to parental expectations or to support their parents in accordance to the values of their parents’ culture of origin. However, older parents may also undergo changes in their perception of intergenerational support and lower their expectations in the process of acculturation. A qualitative cross-cultural comparison is conducted of n = 10 Portuguese and n = 10 Luxembourgish dyadic interviews of older parents and their adult children, both living in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. We will focus on different key issues regarding the regulation of intergenerational family relations between first and second generations of host nationals and immigrants focussing on processes such as interdependent and independent selfconstrual comparing both cultural groups and both generations. First analyses show a heightened importance of geographical proximity in Portuguese migrant families compared to Luxembourgish native families for family relations. Likewise, regular interactions appear to be more required, needed and expected in Portuguese migrant families, especially from the parents while this is only to some extent, supported by their children. [less ▲]

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See detail“It is in giving that we receive, isn’t it?” – Intergenerational family solidarity, reciprocity and subjective well-being in the context of migration.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 17)

Research on intergenerational relations has underlined the importance of reciprocity in the regulation of support exchange. The VOC study has demonstrated cross-cultural differences in reciprocity and ... [more ▼]

Research on intergenerational relations has underlined the importance of reciprocity in the regulation of support exchange. The VOC study has demonstrated cross-cultural differences in reciprocity and effects on subjective well-being. Less is known regarding migrant families as intergenerational support patterns could differ from host families due to specific needs or depending on different value orientations and family norms. Here, we focus therefore on the role of reciprocity in intergenerational family support in a sample of altogether N = 152 Luxembourgish and Portuguese (young) adults and their parents, all living in Luxembourg. In general, parents reported providing more social support for their children than they receive; but PT compared to LUX children reported providing as much social support as they receive from their parents. Results will be discussed within an integrative model on intergenerational family relations in the light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailChanging (multi-)cultural contexts through the lense of the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in 9th European IACCP Conference - Program and the book of abstracts (2017, July 17)

Using the natural laboratory of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 47% as case study example, we outline the diversification of diversity. The immigrant population is increasingly heterogeneous in ... [more ▼]

Using the natural laboratory of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 47% as case study example, we outline the diversification of diversity. The immigrant population is increasingly heterogeneous in terms of countries of origin, length of stay/ generation status, economic participation and acculturation choices. Who is a Luxembourger is increasingly difficult to define and minority or majority becomes ever more fluid. Empirical findings concerning the attitude of the receiving society towards multiculturalism will be presented including implications for national identification. We aim to shed light on inter-individual differences in terms of views on immigration among the receiving society, also taking into consideration regional demographic differences. We draw on two different samples, one from the center of Luxembourg (N = 507), where the native population is in the minority and a more regionally diversified sample (N = 238). Similarities and differences will be highlighted and implications discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational relationship regulation in the light of migration and ageing: The case of (young) adult children and their parents from Portuguese immigrant and Luxembourgish families.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 14)

The negotiation of autonomy and relatedness in the relations between children and their parents constitutes a key topic of intergenerational relationship regulation over the whole family life cycle. In ... [more ▼]

The negotiation of autonomy and relatedness in the relations between children and their parents constitutes a key topic of intergenerational relationship regulation over the whole family life cycle. In the context of migration, an acculturation gap between parents and their adult children might lead to different identity constructions and mutual expectations with regard to intergenerational solidarity and support. These differences in expectations and beliefs can affect relationship quality between the family members from different generations as well as their well-being. In the present study, we focus on a sample of altogether N = 152 Luxembourgish and Portuguese (young) adults and their parents from immigrant and Luxembourgish families, all living in Luxembourg. Portuguese adult children were born resp. had grown up in Luxembourg. First results show a high cohesion in both Portuguese immigrant and luxembourgish families; however, enmeshment and normative expectations regarding adult children’s support for their ageing parents were higher in Portuguese families. The findings further suggest that ambivalence might be experienced in particular when individual striving for independence seems difficult to reconcile with norms of family obligation. Implications for well-being of family members from both generations will be discussed taking into account an integrative model on intergenerational family relations in the light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (13 UL)