References of "Docquier, Frédéric"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe welfare impact of global migration in OECD countries
Burzynski, Michal UL; Docquier, Frederic; Aubry, Amandine

in Journal of International Economics (2016), 101

This paper quantifies the effect of global migration on the welfare of non-migrant OECD citizens. We develop an integrated, multi-country model that accounts for the interactions between the labor market ... [more ▼]

This paper quantifies the effect of global migration on the welfare of non-migrant OECD citizens. We develop an integrated, multi-country model that accounts for the interactions between the labor market, fiscal, and market size effects of migration, as well as for trade relations between countries. The model is calibrated to match the economic and demographic characteristics of the 34 OECD countries and the rest of the world, as well as trade flows between them in the year 2010. We show that recent migration flows have been beneficial for 69% of the non-migrant OECD population, and for 83% of non-migrant citizens of the 22 richest OECD countries. Winners are mainly residing in traditional immigration countries; their gains are substantial and are essentially due to the entry of immigrants from non-OECD countries. Although labor market and fiscal effects are non-negligible in some countries, the greatest source of gain comes from the market size effect, i.e. the change in the variety of goods available to consumers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (13 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlobal Competition for Attracting Talents and the World Economy
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric

in World Economy (2016), Volume 39(Issue 4), 530542

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (4 UL)
See detailCrise des réfugiés : quelques clarifications s'imposent !
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric

Article for general public (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (8 UL)
See detailRemittance and Migration Prospects for the Twenty-First Century
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (13 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfficiency gains from liberalizing labor mobility
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Sekkat, Khalid

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2015), 117(2), 303-346

In this paper, we quantify the effect of a complete liberalization of cross-border migration on the world GDP and its distribution across regions. We build a general equilibrium model, endogenizing ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we quantify the effect of a complete liberalization of cross-border migration on the world GDP and its distribution across regions. We build a general equilibrium model, endogenizing bilateral migration and income disparities between and within countries. Our calibration strategy uses data on effective and potential migration to identify total migration costs and visa costs by education level. Data on potential migration reveal that the number of people in the world who have a desire to migrate is around 400 million. This number is much smaller than that predicted in previous studies, and reflects the existence of high “incompressible” migration costs. In our benchmark framework, liberalizing migration increases the world GDP by 11.5–12.5 percent in the medium term. Our robustness analysis reveals that the gains are always limited, in the range of 7.0 percent (with schooling externalities) to 17.9 percent (if network effects are accounted for). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDissecting Network externalities in International Migration
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frederic; Ozden, Caglar

in Journal of Demographic Economics (2015), 81(4), 379-408

Migrant networks play an important role in explaining the size and structure of migration flows. They affect the private costs and benefits of migration (assimilation channel) and lower legal entry ... [more ▼]

Migrant networks play an important role in explaining the size and structure of migration flows. They affect the private costs and benefits of migration (assimilation channel) and lower legal entry barriers through family reunification programs (policy channel). This paper presents a microfounded identification strategy allowing to disentangle the relative importance of these two channels. Our empirical analysis exploits U.S. immigration data by metropolitan area and country of origin. We first confirm that the overall network externality is strong (the elasticity of migration flows to network size is around one). More interestingly, we show that only a quarter of this elasticity is accounted for by the policy channel for the 1990-2000 period, and the magnitudes of the total network effect and the policy channel are greater for low-skilled migrants. Our results are strongly robust to sample selection, identification assumptions, and treatment for unobserved bilateral heterogeneity. Finally, the policy channel was stronger in the 1990s than in the 1980s, possibly reflecting the changes in the U.S. family reunification policy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)
See detailGlobal competition for attracting talents and the world economy
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
See detailREVENU, POPULATION ET FLUX MIGRATOIRES AU 21ème SIÈCLE: UN DÉFI SOCIÉTAL POUR L’ EUROPE
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInternational migration, transfer of norms and home country fertility
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Schiff, Maurice

in Canadian Journal of Economics (2013), 46(4), 1406-1430

This paper examines the relationship between international migration and source country fertility. The impact of international migration on source country fertility may have a number of causes, including ... [more ▼]

This paper examines the relationship between international migration and source country fertility. The impact of international migration on source country fertility may have a number of causes, including a transfer of destination countries’ fertility norms. We provide a rigorous test of the diffusion of fertility norms using highly detailed original data on migration. Our results provide evidence of a significant transfer of destination countries’ fertility norms from migrants to their country of origin: a 1% decrease (increase) in the fertility norm to which migrants are exposed reduces (raises) home country fertility by about 0.3%. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 187 (122 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Panel Data Analysis of the Brain Gain
Beine, Michel UL; Defoort, Cécily; Docquier, Frederic

in World Development Forum (2011), 39(4)

In this paper, we revisit the impact of skilled emigration on human cap- ital accumulation using new panel data covering 147 countries on the period 1975-2000. We derive testable predictions from a ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we revisit the impact of skilled emigration on human cap- ital accumulation using new panel data covering 147 countries on the period 1975-2000. We derive testable predictions from a stylized theoretical model and test them in dynamic regression models. Our empirical analysis predicts con- ditional convergence of human capital indicators. Our ndings also reveal that skilled migration prospects foster human capital accumulation in low-income countries. In these countries, a net brain gain can be obtained if the skilled emigration rate is not too large (i.e. does not exceed 20 to 30 percent depend- ing on other country characteristics). On the contrary, we find no evidence of a signi ficant incentive mechanism in middle-income and, unsuprisingly, in high-income countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA panel data analysis of the Brain drain
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Defoort, cécily

in World Development : The Multi-Disciplinary International Journal Devoted to the Study and Promotion of World Development (2011), 39(4),

In this paper, we revisit the impact of skilled emigration on human capital accumulation using new panel data covering 147 12 countries during the period 1975–2000. We derive testable predictions from a ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we revisit the impact of skilled emigration on human capital accumulation using new panel data covering 147 12 countries during the period 1975–2000. We derive testable predictions from a stylized theoretical model and test them in dynamic regres- 13 sion models. Our empirical analysis predicts conditional convergence of human capital indicators. Our findings also reveal that skilled 14 migration prospects foster human capital accumulation in low-income countries. In these countries, a net brain gain can be obtained if 15 the skilled emigration rate is not too large (i.e., it does not exceed 20–30% depending on other country characteristics). In contrast, we 16 find no evidence of a significant incentive mechanism in middle-income, and not surprisingly, high-income countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 180 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiasporas
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frederic; Ozden, Caglar

in Journal of Development Economics (2011), 95

Migration flows are shaped by a complex combination of self-selection and out-selection mechanisms, both of which are affected by the presence of a diaspora abroad. In this paper, we analyze how existing ... [more ▼]

Migration flows are shaped by a complex combination of self-selection and out-selection mechanisms, both of which are affected by the presence of a diaspora abroad. In this paper, we analyze how existing diasporas (the stock of people born in a country and living in another one) affect the size and human-capital structure of current bilateral migration flows. Our analysis exploits a bilateral data set on international migration by educational attainment from 195 countries to 30 OECD countries in 1990 and 2000. Based on simple microfoundations and controlling for various determinants of migration, we found that diasporas increase migration flows and lower their average educational level. Interestingly, diasporas explain majority of the variability of migration flows and selection. This suggests that, without changing the generosity of family reunion programs, education-based selection rules are likely to have moderate impact. Our results are highly robust to the econometric techniques, accounting for the large proportion of zeros and endogeneity problems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOn the Robustness of Brain Drain Estimates
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Rapoport, Hillel

in Annales d'Economie et de Statistique (2010), 97

Recent theoretical studies suggest that migration prospects can raise the ex- pected return to human capital and thus foster education investment at home or, in other words, induce a brain gain. In a ... [more ▼]

Recent theoretical studies suggest that migration prospects can raise the ex- pected return to human capital and thus foster education investment at home or, in other words, induce a brain gain. In a recent paper we used the Docquier and Marfouk (2006) data set on emigration rates by education level to examine the impact of brain drain migration on gross (pre-migration) human capital for- mation in developing countries. We found a positive e¤ect of skilled migration prospects on human capital growth in a cross-section of 127 developing coun- tries, with a short-run elasticity of about 5 percent. In this paper we assess the robustness of our results to the use of alternative brain drain measures, de nitions of human capital, and functional forms. We nd that the results hold using alternative brain drain measures controlling for whether migrants acquired their skills in the home or in the host country. We also regress other indicators of human capital investment on skilled migration rates and nd a positive e¤ect on youth literacy while the e¤ect on school enrolment depends on the exact functional speci cation chosen. Finally, we nd our resuls to be robust to using the ratio of skilled to unskilled migration rates (instead of just the former) and to controlling for the demoraphic structure of the population. This [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain Drain and LCD's Growth: Winners and Losers
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Rapoport, Hillel

in Economic Journal (2008), 118

Using new data on emigration rates by education level, we examine the impact of brain drain migration on human capital formation in developing countries. We find evidence of a positive effect of skilled ... [more ▼]

Using new data on emigration rates by education level, we examine the impact of brain drain migration on human capital formation in developing countries. We find evidence of a positive effect of skilled migration prospects on gross human capital formation in a cross-section of 127 countries. For each country of the sample we then estimate the net effect of the brain drain using counterfactual simulations. Countries combining relatively low levels of human capital and low emigration rates are shown to experience a beneficial brain drain , and conversely, there are more losers than winners, and the former tend to lose relatively more than what the latter gain. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 153 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring International Skilled Migration: A New Database Controlling for Age of Entry
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Rapoport, Hillel

in World Bank Economic Review (2007), 21(2), 249-254

In this paper, we provide alternative measures of the brain drain by defining skilled immigrants as those arrived in the receiving country after age 12, 18 or 22. We use data on age of entry collected in ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we provide alternative measures of the brain drain by defining skilled immigrants as those arrived in the receiving country after age 12, 18 or 22. We use data on age of entry collected in a sample of OECD countries and then estimate the age-of-entry structure in the remaining host countries. The corrected brain drain rates are obviously below the global rates calculated in Docquier and Marfouk (2006). 1 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain Drain and LDC's Growth: winners and losers
Beine, Michel UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Rapoport, Hillel

in Economic Journal (2007), 118

We present an empirical evaluation of the growth effects of the brain drain for the source countries of migrants. Using recent US data on migration rates by education levels (Carrington and Detragiache ... [more ▼]

We present an empirical evaluation of the growth effects of the brain drain for the source countries of migrants. Using recent US data on migration rates by education levels (Carrington and Detragiache, 1998), we find empirical support for the "beneficial brain drain hypothesis" in a cross-section of 50 developing countries. At the country-level, we find that most countries combining low levels of human capital and low migration rates of skilled workers tend to be positively affected by the brain drain. By contrast, the brain drain appears to have negative growth effects in countries where the migration rate of the highly educated is above 20% and/or where the proportion of people with higher education is above 5%. While the number of winners is smaller, these include nearly 80% of the total population of the sample. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (0 UL)