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See detailBehavioural outcomes of subthalamic stimulation and medical therapy versus medical therapy alone for Parkinson's disease with early motor complications (EARLYSTIM trial): secondary analysis of an open-label randomised trial.
Lhommee, Eugenie; Wojtecki, Lars; Czernecki, Virginie et al

in The Lancet. Neurology (2018), 17(3), 223-231

BACKGROUND: Although subthalamic stimulation is a recognised treatment for motor complications in Parkinson's disease, reports on behavioural outcomes are controversial, which represents a major challenge ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although subthalamic stimulation is a recognised treatment for motor complications in Parkinson's disease, reports on behavioural outcomes are controversial, which represents a major challenge when counselling candidates for subthalamic stimulation. We aimed to assess changes in behaviour in patients with Parkinson's disease receiving combined treatment with subthalamic stimulation and medical therapy over a 2-year follow-up period as compared with the behavioural evolution under medical therapy alone. METHODS: We did a parallel, open-label study (EARLYSTIM) at 17 surgical centres in France (n=8) and Germany (n=9). We recruited patients with Parkinson's disease who were disabled by early motor complications. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to either medical therapy alone or bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. The primary outcome was mean change in quality of life from baseline to 2 years. A secondary analysis was also done to assess behavioural outcomes. We used the Ardouin Scale of Behavior in Parkinson's Disease to assess changes in behaviour between baseline and 2-year follow-up. Apathy was also measured using the Starkstein Apathy Scale, and depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. The secondary analysis was done in all patients recruited. We used a generalised estimating equations (GEE) regression model for individual items and mixed model regression for subscores of the Ardouin scale and the apathy and depression scales. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00354133. The primary analysis has been reported elsewhere; this report presents the secondary analysis only. FINDINGS: Between July, 2006, and November, 2009, 251 participants were recruited, of whom 127 were allocated medical therapy alone and 124 were assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. At 2-year follow-up, the levodopa-equivalent dose was reduced by 39% (-363.3 mg/day [SE 41.8]) in individuals allocated bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy and was increased by 21% (245.8 mg/day [40.4]) in those assigned medical therapy alone (p<0.0001). Neuropsychiatric fluctuations decreased with bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy during 2-year follow-up (mean change -0.65 points [SE 0.15]) and did not change with medical therapy alone (-0.02 points [0.15]); the between-group difference in change from baseline was significant (p=0.0028). At 2 years, the Ardouin scale subscore for hyperdopaminergic behavioural disorders had decreased with bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy (mean change -1.26 points [SE 0.35]) and had increased with medical therapy alone (1.12 points [0.35]); the between-group difference was significant (p<0.0001). Mean change from baseline at 2 years in the Ardouin scale subscore for hypodopaminergic behavioural disorders, the Starkstein Apathy Scale score, and the Beck Depression Inventory score did not differ between treatment groups. Antidepressants were stopped in 12 patients assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy versus four patients allocated medical therapy alone. Neuroleptics were started in nine patients assigned medical therapy alone versus one patient allocated bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. During the 2-year follow-up, two individuals assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy and one patient allocated medical therapy alone died by suicide. INTERPRETATION: In a large cohort with Parkinson's disease and early motor complications, better overall behavioural outcomes were noted with bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy compared with medical therapy alone. The presence of hyperdopaminergic behaviours and neuropsychiatric fluctuations can be judged additional arguments in favour of subthalamic stimulation if surgery is considered for disabling motor complications. FUNDING: German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, French Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique National, and Medtronic. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide association study in musician's dystonia: a risk variant at the arylsulfatase G locus?
Lohmann, Katja; Schmidt, Alexander; Schillert, Arne et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2014), 29(7), 921-7

Musician's dystonia (MD) affects 1% to 2% of professional musicians and frequently terminates performance careers. It is characterized by loss of voluntary motor control when playing the instrument ... [more ▼]

Musician's dystonia (MD) affects 1% to 2% of professional musicians and frequently terminates performance careers. It is characterized by loss of voluntary motor control when playing the instrument. Little is known about genetic risk factors, although MD or writer's dystonia (WD) occurs in relatives of 20% of MD patients. We conducted a 2-stage genome-wide association study in whites. Genotypes at 557,620 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed stringent quality control for 127 patients and 984 controls. Ten SNPs revealed P < 10(-5) and entered the replication phase including 116 MD patients and 125 healthy musicians. A genome-wide significant SNP (P < 5 x 10(-8) ) was also genotyped in 208 German or Dutch WD patients, 1,969 Caucasian, Spanish, and Japanese patients with other forms of focal or segmental dystonia as well as in 2,233 ethnically matched controls. Genome-wide significance with MD was observed for an intronic variant in the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene (rs11655081; P = 3.95 x 10(-9) ; odds ratio [OR], 4.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66-7.05). rs11655081 was also associated with WD (P = 2.78 x 10(-2) ) but not with any other focal or segmental dystonia. The allele frequency of rs11655081 varies substantially between different populations. The population stratification in our sample was modest (lambda = 1.07), but the effect size may be overestimated. Using a small but homogenous patient sample, we provide data for a possible association of ARSG with MD. The variant may also contribute to the risk of WD, a form of dystonia that is often found in relatives of MD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide association study reveals genetic risk underlying Parkinson's disease.
Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Bras, Jose M. et al

in Nature genetics (2009), 41(12), 1308-12

We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1,713 individuals of European ancestry with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 3,978 controls. After replication in 3,361 cases and 4,573 controls, we ... [more ▼]

We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1,713 individuals of European ancestry with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 3,978 controls. After replication in 3,361 cases and 4,573 controls, we observed two strong association signals, one in the gene encoding alpha-synuclein (SNCA; rs2736990, OR = 1.23, P = 2.24 x 10(-16)) and another at the MAPT locus (rs393152, OR = 0.77, P = 1.95 x 10(-16)). We exchanged data with colleagues performing a GWAS in Japanese PD cases. Association to PD at SNCA was replicated in the Japanese GWAS, confirming this as a major risk locus across populations. We replicated the effect of a new locus detected in the Japanese cohort (PARK16, rs823128, OR = 0.66, P = 7.29 x 10(-8)) and provide supporting evidence that common variation around LRRK2 modulates risk for PD (rs1491923, OR = 1.14, P = 1.55 x 10(-5)). These data demonstrate an unequivocal role for common genetic variants in the etiology of typical PD and suggest population-specific genetic heterogeneity in this disease. [less ▲]

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