References of "De Arcangelis, Giuseppe"
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See detailA preliminary assessment of the effects of migration on the production structure in Europe: A labor task approach
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe; Borelli, Stefania

in Economics Bulletin (2019), 39(1), 289-294

We assess the e ffect of migration on the production structure in a selection of European countries for the pre-Great Recession period 2001-2009. We propose a labor-task approach where the inflow of ... [more ▼]

We assess the e ffect of migration on the production structure in a selection of European countries for the pre-Great Recession period 2001-2009. We propose a labor-task approach where the inflow of migrants raises the relative supply of manual-physical (or simple) tasks and therefore favors simple-task intensive sectors. We use the US O*NET database in conjunction with European labor data to calculate the index of simple-task intensity at the industry and country level. The analysis confi rms that a rise in employment migration rates has a generalized positive impact, but that value-added increases signi ficantly more in sectors that use more intensively simple tasks. A traditional shift-share instrument is used to overcome possible endogeneity problems. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration. Labor Tasks and Production Structure in Europe
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe; Borelli, Stefania

Presentation (2017, September 14)

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See detailRemit for what? The Impact of Information Asymmetries in Transnational Households
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe

E-print/Working paper (2016)

The main purpose of this paper is to check whether information asymmetry may affect the allocation of a given budget between in-kind consumption-type goods and in-kind investment-type choices. In order to ... [more ▼]

The main purpose of this paper is to check whether information asymmetry may affect the allocation of a given budget between in-kind consumption-type goods and in-kind investment-type choices. In order to test the model, we use the results of a lab-in-the-field experiment where migrants engage in a dictator game and are asked to earmark a given budget between consumption and investment goods to be delivered to the most closely connected household (MCCH). Three different scenarios of information sharing with the MCCH on the choices made by the migrant are considered – private information, full information sharing and information sharing with a social excuse for investment goods. Empirical results confirm that under private information investment goods are preferred, whereas under full information sharing we observe a significant bias towards consumption goods (about 70 euros more out of a total budget value of 1000 euros, i.e. 7%). This behavior under different information sharing scenarios may be interpreted as evidence of self-interest motives to remit rather than pure altruism. [less ▲]

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See detailHow do migrants save? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey on temporary and permanent migrants versus natives
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe

in IZA Journal of Migration (2015), 4(11),

This paper investigates the saving behavior of migrants in the UK across different dimensions, i.e., comparing temporary versus permanent migrants and migrants versus natives. Established theoretical ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the saving behavior of migrants in the UK across different dimensions, i.e., comparing temporary versus permanent migrants and migrants versus natives. Established theoretical predictions show that migrants save more when they plan to stay in the destination only temporarily as target savers. Our empirical evidence takes into account the contemporaneous choice of savings and remittances. Moreover, when comparing the saving profiles of both natives and migrants, we uncover the weight of observable socio‐economic characteristics other than income and wealth. We use the British Household Panel Survey for the period 1991‐2008. The estimation results confirm that temporary migrants have a propensity to save 26 per cent higher than permanent migrants in UK. We also introduce an index of financial capability adjusted for income as an explanatory variable and, when employing the Blinder‐Oaxaca decomposition for the Tobit model of saving choice, migrants are more affected by observable social‐economic characteristics than natives. [less ▲]

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See detailDirecting remittances to education with soft and hard commitments: Evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe; McKenzie, David et al

in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organisation (2015), 111

This paper tests how migrants’ willingness to remit changes when given the ability to direct remittances to educational purposes using different forms of commitment. Variants of a dictator game in a lab ... [more ▼]

This paper tests how migrants’ willingness to remit changes when given the ability to direct remittances to educational purposes using different forms of commitment. Variants of a dictator game in a lab-in-the-field experiment with Filipino migrants in Rome are used to examine remitting behavior under varying degrees of commitment. These range from the soft commitment of simply labeling remittances as being for education, to the hard commitment of having funds directly paid to a school and the student’s educational performance monitored. We find that the introduction of simple labeling for education raises remittances by more than 15%. Adding the ability to directly send this funding to the school adds only a further 2.2%. We randomly vary the information asymmetry between migrants and their most closely connected household, but find no significant change in the remittance response to these forms of commitment as information varies. Behavior in these games is then shown to be predictive of take-up of a new financial product called EduPay, designed to allow migrants to directly pay remittances to schools in the Philippines. We find this take-up is largely driven by a response to the ability to label remittances for education, rather than to the hard commitment feature of directly paying schools. [less ▲]

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