References of "De Bres, Julia 50001482"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLangues de France et Charte européenne des langues régionales ou minoritaires: inventaire critique des arguments anti-ratification
Roger, Geoffrey; De Bres, Julia UL

in Sociolinguistic Studies = Estudios de Sociolingüística (2017), 11(1), 131-152

The deliberations in France surrounding the potential ratification of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (January 2014 - October 2015) resulted in a national debate unheard of since ... [more ▼]

The deliberations in France surrounding the potential ratification of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (January 2014 - October 2015) resulted in a national debate unheard of since 1999, providing new insight into resistance towards promoting these languages in the public space. Despite a recent survey claiming that ‘the ideological barriers on this issue have now almost disappeared’, the virulent arguments opposing ratification finally triumphed in the Senate. Basing ourselves on comments published in the media by a range of opponents to ratification of the Charter, we review here the various ideological strategies used to preserve the linguistic status quo in France and to maintain the supremacy of French. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailFriend or foe? The discourse of the rise of English in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL

Article for general public (2017)

‘Gëtt hei geschwë méi Englesch wéi Franséich geschriwwen?’ (‘Will English soon be written here more than French?’) was the question asked by an article on Radio 100,7’s website last April. The article was ... [more ▼]

‘Gëtt hei geschwë méi Englesch wéi Franséich geschriwwen?’ (‘Will English soon be written here more than French?’) was the question asked by an article on Radio 100,7’s website last April. The article was about a conference on languages in literature in Luxembourg, and noted that English was taking on ‘ever greater importance’ in this field. True or not, this illustrates a trend that I call the discourse of the rise of English in Luxembourg. This discourse assumes a zero-sum game where one language can only prosper at the expense of another, and where English is given a privileged status alongside Luxembourg’s official languages: Luxembourgish, French and German. Like all such discourses, it represents a social construction rather than a ‘truth’ about language, and its promoters are seeking to advance certain social interests. From a discursive point of view, it is less important to determine whether the use of English is indeed rising in Luxembourg than it is to explore what people are trying to achieve with this discourse, that is, what interests they are seeking to advance by claiming that English is on the rise. There is no research to date that specifically focuses on discourses about English in Luxembourg, but such discourses do appear in research on sociolinguistic issues more generally in the country. This is the case with my own research and teaching at the University of Luxembourg, in areas including the language ideologies of cross-border workers, young people’s use of English, and language use on social media. My aim here is to consider how the discourse of the rise of English is constructed in these domains, how people respond to it, and what the potential social effects are. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSinging is the first thing that came into my head: Emotions and language maintenance among Filipino migrants in New Zealand
De Bres, Julia UL

in Marra, Meredith; Warren, Paul (Eds.) Linguist at Work. Festschrift for Janet Holmes (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailCross-border workers and linguistic mobility
De Bres, Julia UL

Article for general public (2016)

One of Luxembourg’s statistical peculiarities is that almost half of the workforce does not live in the country. Research has shown that Luxembourg residents appreciate the economic benefits that this ... [more ▼]

One of Luxembourg’s statistical peculiarities is that almost half of the workforce does not live in the country. Research has shown that Luxembourg residents appreciate the economic benefits that this cross-border phenomenon brings to the country, but when it comes to the linguistic and cultural impact of cross-border workers, they tend to demur. Here, cross-border workers are more likely to be framed as a threat to Luxembourg society, and to the Luxembourgish language in particular . The trope of the arrogant French bakery worker incapable of selling – or at least unwilling to sell – a croissant in Luxembourgish is no doubt familiar to all. But what is the linguistic reality of cross-border workers? What are their attitudes towards multilingualism in Luxembourg, and how do they cope with language diversity at work? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultilingual advertising and regionalization in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Spaces and Identities in Border Regions. Politics - Media - Subjects (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRepresentations and Projections.
Belling, Luc UL; De Bres, Julia UL; Cicotti, Claudio UL et al

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Spaces and Identities in Border Regions. Politics – Media – Subjects. (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 206 (23 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntroduction: Language policies on social network sites
De Bres, Julia UL

in Language Policy (2015), 14(4), 309-314

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFree Your Stuff Luxembourg! Language policies, practices and ideologies in a multilingual Facebook group
De Bres, Julia UL; Belling, Luc UL

in Language Policy (2015), 14(4), 357-375

This article considers the dynamic relationship between language policies, practices and ideologies in a multilingual Facebook group in Luxembourg. The group under focus, ‘Free Your Stuff Luxembourg’, was ... [more ▼]

This article considers the dynamic relationship between language policies, practices and ideologies in a multilingual Facebook group in Luxembourg. The group under focus, ‘Free Your Stuff Luxembourg’, was created to facilitate the costfree exchange of consumer goods between members located in Luxembourg. The article traces the development of a language policy for a group that facilitates communication between people of diverse nationalities in an officially trilingual country, where French, German and Luxembourgish operate as administrative languages and English plays an increasingly important role. Part one analyses the development of the group’s official language policy by group administrators, showing progression from an implicitly English language policy to an explicitly multilingual policy, incorporating a strong place for Luxembourgish. Part two considers how the language practices of group members relate to this official language policy, using a quantitative analysis of the language(s) of group posts across three periods from February 2011 to April 2012. This analysis shows a shift from predominantly English language practices to a balance between English and Luxembourgish, and finally a dominance of Luxembourgish. Part three investigates a further influence on language policy development, the language ideologies of group administrators and members, as expressed in language ideological debates within the group. The results provide several insights in relation to language policies in the new media, addressing the role of new agents of language policy (group administrators) in regulating language use in this context, the processes by which individuals police each other’s language use online, and the extent to which language practices in online environments can be managed, if at all, through language policy activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 211 (32 UL)
Full Text
See detailLanguage profiles and practices of cross-border workers in Luxembourg
Franziskus, Anne UL; De Bres, Julia UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

This paper summarises the findings of a questionnaire study investigating the language pro-files and practices of cross-border workers in Luxembourg. The study was undertaken in 2009 and includes 128 ... [more ▼]

This paper summarises the findings of a questionnaire study investigating the language pro-files and practices of cross-border workers in Luxembourg. The study was undertaken in 2009 and includes 128 cross-border workers from 35 workplaces from different sectors, including the health sector, higher education and research, the manufacturing industry and the service sector. The study suggests that all the participants have a multilingual profile and have learnt at least one language in addition to their first one in the course of their life. A second result is that French is used in all the workplaces under investigation. But, at the same time, the major-ity of the cross-border worker participants have a multilingual professional life, most of them using more than one language at work on an everyday basis. This multilingualism comes in the form of a wide range of multilingual practices, including language accommodation, use of a lingua franca, code-switching and receptive multilingualism. Furthermore, two thirds of the participants report having learnt Luxembourgish either formally or informally, and half of those who have not learnt it, would like to do so in the future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailMultilingualism in advertising and a shifting balance of languages in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Much research on multilingualism in advertising has been undertaken in comparatively mono-lingual settings. Whereas such research may provide insights into the connotations of lan-guages used in ... [more ▼]

Much research on multilingualism in advertising has been undertaken in comparatively mono-lingual settings. Whereas such research may provide insights into the connotations of lan-guages used in advertising, research in more multilingual contexts can also provide different kinds of insights regarding the relative status of languages in a multilingual environment. This article focuses on multilingualism in written advertising in the highly multilingual setting of Luxembourg, where the language situation is currently undergoing significant change due to patterns of globalisation and migration. Analysis of a mixed corpus of advertisements, includ-ing 1,038 advertisements in the free daily newspaper l’Essentiel from 2009 to 2011, as well as selected further advertisements from elsewhere within Luxembourg’s linguistic landscape, reflects a move within Luxembourg in general from a longstanding trilingualism in French, German and Luxembourgish to different kinds of multilingualism, incorporating both the presence of new languages and changes in the relative roles of French, German and Luxem-bourgish. Particularly significant is the presence of Luxembourgish as a written language of advertising, whereas it traditionally functioned mainly as a spoken language in Luxembourg. The article presents the results of a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the advertisements and discusses how multilingualism in written advertising provides a pertinent window on changing forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 204 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLanguage policies on social network sites
De Bres, Julia UL

in Language Policy (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntercultural work environments in Luxembourg. Multilingualism and cultural diversity among cross-border workers at the workplace
Wille, Christian UL; De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne

E-print/Working paper (2015)

The trilingual country of Luxembourg accounts for the highest percentage of cross-border workers in the European Union. These workers commute daily from France, Belgium and Germany to Luxembourg. Their ... [more ▼]

The trilingual country of Luxembourg accounts for the highest percentage of cross-border workers in the European Union. These workers commute daily from France, Belgium and Germany to Luxembourg. Their presence in the national labour market results in increasing linguistic and cultural diversity at Luxembourgish workplaces. Drawing upon interview and interactional data, the present contribution is the first to investigate how cross-border workers in Luxembourg perceive and deal with multilingualism and interculturality, and presents a range of related linguistic and intercultural practices. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 447 (25 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe hierarchy of minority languages in New Zealand
De Bres, Julia UL

in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development (2015)

This article makes a case for the existence of a minority language hierarchy in New Zealand. Based on an analysis of language ideologies expressed in recent policy documents and interviews with ... [more ▼]

This article makes a case for the existence of a minority language hierarchy in New Zealand. Based on an analysis of language ideologies expressed in recent policy documents and interviews with policymakers and representatives of minority language communities, it presents the arguments forwarded in support of the promotion of different types of minority languages in New Zealand, as well as the reactions of representatives of other minority language communities to these arguments. The research suggests that the arguments in favour of minority language promotion are most widely accepted for the Māori language, followed by New Zealand Sign Language, then Pacific languages, and finally community languages. While representatives of groups at the lower levels of the hierarchy often accept arguments advanced in relation to languages nearer the top, this is not the case in the other direction. Recognition of connections between the language communities is scarce, with the group representatives tending to present themselves as operating in isolation from one another, rather than working towards common interests. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 150 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRepräsentationen und Projektionen.
Belling, Luc UL; De Bres, Julia UL; Cicotti, Claudio UL et al

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Räume und Identitäten in Grenzregionen. Politiken – Medien – Subjekte. (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (14 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMehrsprachige Werbung und Regionalisierung in Luxemburg
De Bres, Julia UL

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Räume und Identitäten in Grenzregionen. Politiken – Medien – Subjekt (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (27 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDigital superdiversity in Luxembourg: The role of Luxembourgish in a multilingual Facebook group
Belling, Luc UL; De Bres, Julia UL

in Discourse, Context & Media (2014), 4-5(2014), 74-86

The concept of superdiversity (Vertovec 2007) is useful for describing the linguistic and demographic situation of Luxembourg. Luxembourg has a historically trilingual language situation incorporating ... [more ▼]

The concept of superdiversity (Vertovec 2007) is useful for describing the linguistic and demographic situation of Luxembourg. Luxembourg has a historically trilingual language situation incorporating Luxembourgish, French and German. In addition to this, the growth of the financial sector has increased the presence of English as a lingua franca. In addition to changing migration patterns, new online phenomena also influence language and communication practices in Luxembourg. This paper analyses digital communication practices related to superdiversity in a Facebook group associated with Luxembourg. Although the main purpose of this group is to facilitate the gifting of consumer goods, it has the side-effect of promoting intercultural and multilingual contact among diverse residents of Luxembourg. The paper focuses on how communication is organised between the diverse members of the group, based on a quantitative and qualitative analysis of language practices over the first eighteen months of the group's existence. The analysis illustrates how language became an issue with the growth of the group, shows how members' language practices changed over time, and highlights the role of the group administrators, who intervened to regulate incidents within the group and facilitate group communication. The paper also considers how technical features of this particular digital environment impact on communication practices within the group. The results of the analysis show that language practices of group members tend inexorably towards homogenisation rather than diversification, putting into question the relationship between a superdiverse context and superdiverse communicative practices. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (15 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCompeting language ideologies about societal multilingualism among cross-border workers in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL

in International Journal of the Sociology of Language (2014), 227

Due to the weakening of state borders within the European Union and the favorable economic situation of Luxembourg, there has been a steep rise in migration across Luxembourg’s borders. Of special ... [more ▼]

Due to the weakening of state borders within the European Union and the favorable economic situation of Luxembourg, there has been a steep rise in migration across Luxembourg’s borders. Of special prominence are cross-border workers, who live in the surrounding border regions of France, Belgium and Germany and now make up 44 percent of the workforce. This increasing presence of ‘foreigners’ is prompting substantial change to Luxembourg’s traditionally triglossic language situation, where Luxembourgish, French and German have coexisted in public use. In this situation, competing language ideologies are likely to emerge, reflecting the interests of different groups. Horner and Weber (2008) discuss the presence of two opposing language ideologies among the autochthonous population: the trilingual language ideology (trilingualism as the ‘language’ of Luxembourg); and the nationalist language ideology (Luxembourgish as the only true language of Luxembourg), which latter they claim has increased in reaction to the rise in cross-border workers. Little research has been done on the language ideologies of cross-border workers themselves, however. Encountering Luxembourg’s multilingualism, cross-border workers may adopt one of the ideologies above, or one of two further competing ideologies: that of societal multilingualism as a problem or as an opportunity. Through analysis of metalinguistic discourse in interviews with thirty cross-border workers in Luxembourg, this article examines how participants approach societal multilingualism in Luxembourg and how cross-border workers might contribute to competing perspectives on the place of languages in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 203 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultilingual practices of university students and changing forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2014), 11(1), 62-75

With its own national language, Luxembourgish, and three languages of administration, French, German and Luxembourgish, Luxembourg has long been a very multilingual country. The nature of this ... [more ▼]

With its own national language, Luxembourgish, and three languages of administration, French, German and Luxembourgish, Luxembourg has long been a very multilingual country. The nature of this multilingualism is now changing, due to the rising proportion of migrants in the country, who now make up 43% of the resident population. The changing demographic profile of Luxembourg is reflected in a diversification of language practices within this already highly multilingual context. This article focuses on one group of people who exemplify these changes, 24 students of diverse national and language backgrounds at the University of Luxembourg. Using data from a language diaries exercise conducted as part of an introductory course on multilingualism, we examine the reported multilingual practices of the students and consider what these language practices reveal about traditional and newer forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (9 UL)
See detailLanguage ideologies for constructing inclusion and exclusion: identity and interest in the metalinguistic discourse of cross-border workers in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL

in Barat, Erzebet; Studer, Patrick; Nekvapil, Jiri (Eds.) Ideological Conceptualisations of Language: Discourses of Linguistic Diversity (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (7 UL)
See detail‘I learnt English – the wrong thing, eh’ – power, interests and language practices among cross-border workers in Luxembourg
Franziskus, Anne UL; De Bres, Julia UL; Gilles, Peter UL

in Koff, Harlan; Schulz, Christian; Gilles, Peter (Eds.) Theorising Power through Analyses of Border Relationships (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (15 UL)