References of "Coulombe, Serge"
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See detailImmmigration and Internal Mobility in Canada
Beine, Michel UL; Coulombe, Serge

in Journal of Population economics (2018), 31(1), 69-106

We analyze the impact of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) and permanent immigrants on interprovincial mobility in Canada. Particular attention is given to the Canadian program of TFWs that has intensified ... [more ▼]

We analyze the impact of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) and permanent immigrants on interprovincial mobility in Canada. Particular attention is given to the Canadian program of TFWs that has intensified enormously over the last 30 years. Results of the empirical analysis are analyzed through the lens of a small theoretical model that incorporates a job-matching framework (Pissaridès, 1985, 2000) in a migration model à la Harris and Todaro (1970). We find that the inflow of TFWs into a given province tends to substantially decrease net interprovincial mobility. This is not the case, however, for the inflow of permanent immigrants selected through the Canadian point system. On average, each inflow of 100 TFWs is found to decrease net interprovincial migrants within the year by about 50, a number substantially higher than is present in existing literature. This number increases to 180 in the long run. The negative impact of TFWs is ascribed to the fact that TFWs are hired directly by employers, take vacant jobs, and display employment and participation rates of close to 100 per cent. Our paper suggests that, in general, the impact of immigration on labor market conditions depends critically on the way immigrants are selected. [less ▲]

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See detailMoving Parts: Immigration Policy, Internal Migration and Natural resource Shocks
Coulombe, Serge; Boadway, Robin; Beine, Michel UL

in CD Howe Institute Commentary (2016), (446),

The Canadian government made major changes in 2014 to both the Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program and the permanent economic immigration system. Under the previous system and its enforcement ... [more ▼]

The Canadian government made major changes in 2014 to both the Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program and the permanent economic immigration system. Under the previous system and its enforcement, temporary foreign workers were in competition with some Canadian residents, resulting in major political backlash. In addition, permanent immigrants to Canada were not generally moving to locations with the strongest demand for jobs. The federal changes to the TFW Program limited the kinds of workers companies could bring in, made the applications more rigorous, and set an employer-specific cap on the use of TFWs. These changes will lead to a decrease in the number of TFWs working in Canada. In the permanent immigration system, the government modified the traditional points system and created the Express Entry System. International applicants must meet a threshold of points before the government will invite them to apply for immigration. The system is skewed toward labour-market demand. It rewards workers who have skills that the federal government determines the labour market needs. It also rewards permanent immigrants who have a Canadian job offer. We expect that the changes to the permanent immigration system will have many positive results. Immigrants will have better skills and improved job-market outcomes, and they will meet employer needs more closely than permanent immigrants did in the past. Likewise, recent changes to the TFW Program will improve the labour market for existing residents. However, the changes in the immigration system may have some unintended consequences. First, they make it difficult for international students at Canadian universities to become permanent residents. Further, whereas TFWs were the main source of labour-market competition for Canadian residents until 2014, new permanent immigrants will increasingly compete with Canadian residents. This change will have profound implications for interprovincial migration. Lastly, the permanent immigration policy prioritizes skills currently in demand, and that preference may decrease the immigration of workers whose skills may be more important in the longer term. [less ▲]

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See detailDutch Disease and The Mitigation Effect of Migration: Evidence from Canadian Provinces
Beine, Michel UL; Coulombe, Serge; Vermeulen, Wessel

in Economic Journal (2015), 152(589), 1574-1615

This paper evaluates whether immigration can mitigate the Dutch disease effects associated with booms in natural resource sectors. We derive predicted changes in the size of the non-tradable sector from a ... [more ▼]

This paper evaluates whether immigration can mitigate the Dutch disease effects associated with booms in natural resource sectors. We derive predicted changes in the size of the non-tradable sector from a small general-equilibrium model `a la Obstfeld-Rogoff. Using data for Canadian provinces, we find evidence that aggregate immigration mitigates the increase in the size of the non-tradable sector in booming regions. The mitigation effect is due mostly to interprovincial migration and temporary foreign workers. There is no evidence of such an effect for permanent international immigration. Interprovincial migration also results in a spreading effect of Dutch disease from booming to non-booming provinces. JEL Classi [less ▲]

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See detailDoes the Canadian economy suffer from Dutch disease?
Beine, Michel UL; Bos, Charles S.; Coulombe, Serge

in Resource and Energy Economics (2012), 34(4), 468-492

We argue that the failure to disentangle the evolution of the Canadian currency from the U.S. currency leads to potentially incorrect conclusions regarding the case of Dutch disease in Canada. We propose ... [more ▼]

We argue that the failure to disentangle the evolution of the Canadian currency from the U.S. currency leads to potentially incorrect conclusions regarding the case of Dutch disease in Canada. We propose a new approach that is aimed at extracting both currency components and energy- and commodity-price components from observed exchange rates and prices. We first analyze the separate influence of commodity prices on the Canadian and the U.S. currency components. We then estimate the separate impact of the two currency components on the shares of manufacturing employment in Canada. We show that between 33 and 39 per cent of the manufacturing employment loss that was due to exchange rate developments between 2002 and 2007 is related to the Dutch disease phenomenon. The remaining proportion of the employment loss can be ascribed to the weakness of the U.S. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic Integration and the Diversification of Regional Exports: Evidence from the Canadian-US Free Trade Agreement
Beine, Michel UL; Coulombe, Serge

in Journal of Economic Geography (2007), 7(1), 93-111

We investigate the impact of Canada–U.S. trade integration on the degree of export diversification of the Canadian regions. Trade integration is captured through the decrease of trade-weighted tariffs ... [more ▼]

We investigate the impact of Canada–U.S. trade integration on the degree of export diversification of the Canadian regions. Trade integration is captured through the decrease of trade-weighted tariffs that were boosted by implementation of the Canadian–U.S. Free Trade Agreement. We found strong evidence to support integration’s long-run impact on the patterns of absolute exports diversification. Significantly, this new finding remains robust to the exclusion of the primary sectors and to the potential presence of unit root in the data. Our results lead us to support a positive long-run relationship between trade integration and export diversification. [less ▲]

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