References of "Christmann, Nathalie 50001278"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailExtending the scale of critical housing studies: Towards ‘cross-border gentrification’?
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2017, April)

Drawing upon the case of a polycentric cross-border metropolitan region in western Europe, this paper seeks to explore population mobility and housing market developments at the regional/international ... [more ▼]

Drawing upon the case of a polycentric cross-border metropolitan region in western Europe, this paper seeks to explore population mobility and housing market developments at the regional/international scale. Transnational linkages within this cross-border region intensified with the opening of the borders and the economic development of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg as a global financial centre and a centre for European Institutions. Today about 44 per cent of employees working in Luxembourg live nearby across the Belgian, French or German border. One of the reasons is that housing prices in Luxembourg are nearly twice those in the neighbouring border regions. This increased mobility has an impact on the residents living in these areas. The research that guides this paper aims to detect perceptions of this phenomenon. Therefore principles of municipal policy, urban planning documents and the local media of three medium sized towns in the borderland are reviewed. Following a rather open research concept based on qualitative approaches (discourse analysis, grounded theory), findings reveal that locational advantages such as the proximity to Luxembourg do play a role; the perception that affordable housing is becoming increasingly critical leads to resentments that mix up with national stereotypes; while city officials report displacement due to the border-effect, they also illustrate the opportunities for regional development; at the same time property developers foster the internationalisation of urban planning. Pointing to the relational geographies that link these different places, the paper discusses the pros and cons of an umbrella concept that might be called ‘cross-border gentrification’. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailTracing the place of home. The specificities, policies and dilemmas of Luxembourg’s housing sector
Christmann, Nathalie UL; Hesse, Markus UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in Ballini, Claude; Ecker, Serge; Grünkranz, Daniel (Eds.) et al Tracing Transitions (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (9 UL)
See detailDwelling trends in border regions – towards an inter-urban discourse analysis
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2016, May)

Effects of population mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Effects of population mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the perceptions of population mobility and dwelling in the Greater Region, a transnational cross-border polycentric region in Western Europe. The economic development of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg calls for a constant expansion of the labour market, attracting cross-border commuters and a ‘highly mobile elite’. The concomitant rises in property prices as well as the extreme housing shortages in Luxembourg have led to an expansion of the housing market into the border regions. “Je t’aime, moi non plus” (I love you… nor do I): this is how the French newspaper L’Express (02.12.2011; N° 3152: II) summarises the transnational linkages of Luxembourg with its neighbouring countries. German media and urban planning documents refer to the ‚Luxembourg-effect’, summing up several developments such as cross-border commuting and related traffic collapses (short distance becomes relative in this concern, because travel time is increasing extremely in rush hours), the increase of housing costs but also cross-border shopping etc. On the one hand, the ‘economic engine’ Luxembourg offers workplaces for many commuters, positively affecting the development of this European cross-border polycentric region; on the other hand, negative consequences such as the overcrowded real estate market in Luxembourg continue beyond the national border and affect neighbouring housing markets. Some city development plans show that city councils perceive the proximity to Luxembourg as an opportunity for the development of the city. Simultaneously, locals that do not have their job in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg might feel displaced and develop resentment vis-à-vis their new neighbours from Luxembourg, Belgium, Germany, and France that moved to the border region to work in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. These labour migrants/highly mobile elite bring higher purchasing power and are driving increasing rental and housing prices. Depending on the context, similar effects can thus be perceived/constructed very differently by city councils or planners and the local population and even within the same social world/arena. Assuming that abstract societal processes become concrete and experienced at the local level, this paper interrogates the discursive framing of the consequences of the transnational linkages in regard to housing situations in the Greater Region. To distinct the formation and the operation of linguistic constructions about places and regions, and their amalgamation with the practices of actors and institutions, guiding principles of municipal policy, urban planning documents and the local media of three medium sized towns in the borderland Arlon in Belgium, Thionville in France and Trier in Germany are being analysed. Furthermore stakeholder interviews are conducted to gain deeper insights into individual perceptions. Even though their distance to Luxembourg is quite similar (30 to 50 km), these three cities have to be considered as single cases, with distinct developments. Whereas Thionville for example is often being considered as a dormitory town, this is not the case for Trier. Nevertheless, a review of recent media coverage reveals that the situation is characterized by a sort of lovehate relationship. A social constructionist approach is adopted to trigger an increasing awareness for the emerging transnational housing market. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 UL)
See detailMobility and neighbourhood dynamics in border regions - towards an inter-urban discourse analysis
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2016, April)

This paper focuses on the perceptions of population mobility and dwelling in a crossborder polycentric region in Western Europe. The economic development of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg calls for a ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on the perceptions of population mobility and dwelling in a crossborder polycentric region in Western Europe. The economic development of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg calls for a constant expansion of the labor market, attracting cross-border commuters and a ‘highly mobile elite’. The rises in property prices as well as the extreme housing shortages in Luxembourg have led to an expansion of the housing market into the border regions. While previous studies have so far mostly dealt with the socio-demographic characteristics of the transmigrants, this research aims to detect perceptions of the phenomenon by applying a discourse analysis. To do so, guiding principles of municipal policy, urban planning documents and the local media of three medium sized towns in the borderland (Belgium, France, Germany) are being analyzed. Furthermore stakeholder interviews are conducted to gain deeper insights into individual perceptions. A review of recent media coverage reveals that the situation is characterized by a sort of love-hate relationship. Depending on the context, the case is constructed rather differently by city councils or planners and the local population and even within the same social arena. In a public-private-partnership new city quarters are developed for luxury housing and in the contested draft of the land development plan residential areas with a good connectivity to Luxembourg are foreseen. While in parallel city officials also report displacement. A social constructionist approach is adopted to trigger an increasing awareness for the emerging transnational housing market and changing social-spatial divisions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailDwelling trends in border regions - towards an inter-urban discourse analysis
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2015, June)

Effects of population mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Effects of population mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the perceptions of the effects of population mobility and dwelling in a transnational cross-border polycentric metropolitan region in Western Europe. The economic development of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg calls for a constant expansion of the labour market, attracting cross-border commuters and a ‘highly mobile elite’. The concomitant rise in property prices as well as the extreme housing shortages in Luxembourg have led to an expansion of the housing market into the border regions. So far studies have mostly dealt with the socio-demographic characteristics of the transmigrants. This research aims to detect people’s perceptions of the phenomenon by applying a discourse analysis, thus helping to trigger an increasing awareness for the emerging transnational housing market. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailDwelling in border regions – discourse matters
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2015, June)

Effects of cross-border mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Effects of cross-border mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the consequences of the cross-border mobility in relation to housing markets in four cities in a transnational cross-border polycentric metropolitan region in Western Europe. It applies Clarke’s situational analysis and Keller’s sociology of knowledge approach to discourse, in order to represent the complexity and contradictions going along with this development. Until now, the study of cross-border mobility focused mainly on the motives of citizens that left their country of origin to dwell in the close by border regions, while the related impacts on neighbouring communities remain mostly unexplored. A quick review of recent media coverage could easily lead one to describe the situation as a sort of love-hate relationship. Analytic cartographies are employed to show that similar effects can be perceived quite differently. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (7 UL)
Full Text
See detailResidential mobility in cross-border regions – an inter-urban discourse analysis
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2015, April)

Effects of cross-border mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Effects of cross-border mobility resulting from uneven development in border regions can be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. This paper focuses on the consequences of the cross-border mobility in relation to housing markets in four cities in a transnational cross-border polycentric metropolitan region in Western Europe. It applies Clarke’s situational analysis and Keller’s sociology of knowledge approach to discourse, in order to represent the complexity and contradictions going along with this development. These approaches intend to supplement grounded theory (mainly based on Strauss) and include discourse analysis inspired by Foucault. Until now, the study of cross-border mobility focused mainly on the motives of citizens that left their country of origin to dwell in the close by border regions, while the related impacts on neighboring communities remain mostly unexplored. A quick review of recent media coverage could easily lead one to describe the situation as a sort of love-hate relationship. The demand-induced increase of the housing prices and the coexistence of old and new settlements lead to social tensions and new challenges of integration within the respective communities. At the same time, in urban development concepts, the increase of citizens is considered as an opportunity for the development of the cities. Analytic cartographies are employed to show that similar effects can be perceived quite differently. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (12 UL)
See detailWohnungsmärkte in Grenzregionen. Der facettenreiche Luxemburg-Effekt!
Nienaber, Birte UL; Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2015)

„Je t’aime, moi non plus“ (dt. Übersetzung: „Ich liebe dich... ich dich auch nicht.“): so beschreibt die französische Tageszeitung L’Express (2011, S. II) die transnationalen Beziehungen zwischen ... [more ▼]

„Je t’aime, moi non plus“ (dt. Übersetzung: „Ich liebe dich... ich dich auch nicht.“): so beschreibt die französische Tageszeitung L’Express (2011, S. II) die transnationalen Beziehungen zwischen Luxemburg und der Nachbarregion Lothringen. So ließen sich wohl auch die Relationen zu den anderen Nachbarregionen zusammenfassen. Einerseits bietet der „Wirtschaftsmotor“ Luxemburg Arbeitsplätze für zahlreiche Pendler, was die Großregion (Luxemburg, Saarland, Rheinland-Pfalz, Wallonien, Lothringen) positiv beeinflusst; andererseits machen negative Konsequenzen wie die rasante Entwicklung der Miet- und Grundstückspreise in Luxemburg nicht an den Grenzen halt. Der sogenannte „Luxemburg-Effekt“ geht unter anderem einher mit einer Verdrängung von Teilen der lokalen Bevölkerung, die nicht in Luxemburg arbeiten. Der „Luxemburg-Effekt“ beschreibt eine sehr facettenreiche Erscheinung, die sich zuweilen auf Arbeitsmarktvorteile, das Verkehrsaufkommen, demographische Entwicklungen und Auswirkungen auf die Wohnungsmärkte bezieht und somit als eine lokale/regionale Bezeichnung für das Phänomen border paradox angesehen werden kann. Die Wohnungsmärkte in der Großregion weisen unterschiedliche Konstellationen auf. Es kam jedoch in beinahe allen Teilgebieten der Großregion im Einzugsgebiet des luxemburgischen Arbeitsmarktes zu einem Anstieg der Immobilienpreise. Die höhere Kaufkraft der Zuziehenden bringt steigende Grundstücks- und Mietpreise in den Zielgebieten mit sich. Ressentiments gegenüber den „neuen“ Nachbarn sind die Folge. Andererseits zeigen etwa die anhaltende Ausweisung von Bauland und die Zukunftskonzepte zahlreicher Gemeinden, dass Politiker und Planer die Nähe zu Luxemburg als positiv für die Entwicklung ihrer Region bewerten. Je nach Kontext werden demnach die Auswirkungen sehr unterschiedlich wahrgenommen. Das Ziel dieses Beitrages ist es, die diskursive Verarbeitung der raumpolitischen Auswirkungen, die sich aufgrund der Nähe zu Luxemburg ergeben, in Bezug auf die Wohnungsmärkte in der Großregion zu untersuchen. Diskurse über die Wahrnehmung der Veränderungen in Bezug auf den Wohnungsmarkt sollen anhand der Auswertung von Planungsdokumenten und Artikeln aus lokalen Tageszeitungen nachgezeichnet werden. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailWohnmobilität in der Großregion - eine interurbane Diskursanalyse
Christmann, Nathalie UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

“Je t’aime, moi non plus” : this is how the French newspaper L’Express (2011, p. II) summarises the transnational linkages of Luxembourg with its neighbouring countries. On the one hand, the ‘economic ... [more ▼]

“Je t’aime, moi non plus” : this is how the French newspaper L’Express (2011, p. II) summarises the transnational linkages of Luxembourg with its neighbouring countries. On the one hand, the ‘economic engine’ Luxembourg offers workplaces for many commuters, positively affecting the development of this European cross-border polycentric metropolitan region; on the other hand, negative consequences such as the overcrowded real estate mar-ket in Luxembourg continue beyond the national border and affect neighbouring housing markets. The ‘2020 Concept for the Region Trier’ shows that city councils perceive the prox-imity to Luxembourg as an opportunity for the development of the city. Simultaneously, lo-cals might feel displaced due to increasing rents and house prices, and develop resentment vis-à-vis their new neighbours, coming either from Luxembourg, or being Belgian, German or French nationals (labour migrants) that have moved to the border region to work in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, thus disposing of higher purchase power. Depending on the context, similar effects can thus be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. So far, studies dealing with the processes of transmigration have mostly focussed on indi-vidual motives of migrants, whereas impacts on the regions of destination have not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore ongoing discourses dealing with spatial impacts in relation to urban housing markets within the Greater Region. The focus will be on the cit-ies Arlon (BE), Metz and Thionville (FR), and Trier (DE). Therefore mixed methods will be de-ployed. Firstly, a quantitative analysis is planned to reveal the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the (cross-border) residential mobility. The evolution of housing prices and rents as well as population dynamics will be examined. Secondly, ongoing discourses and the changes of life-worlds will be studied using quantitative methods as well as qualitative methods, such as content analysis, to review the guiding principles of municipal policy and urban planning documents. A quantitative analysis of local newspapers will be conducted to analyse public opinion. A content analysis of this material will follow. The method mix allows us to better understand “material” evolutions and to trace the current discourses within this field. Discourse approaches have become common in interdis-ciplinary social science academic research. However, there are no established theoretical and methodological guidelines for applying these approaches. This project has to deal with this situation and to take into account different cultural backgrounds and discussion levels. This study will help to frame today’s situation and aims to develop sustainable solutions for future urban planning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 363 (10 UL)
See detailConsequences of the internationalisation of housing markets within the Greater region – an inter-urban discourse analysis
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2014)

“Je t’aime, moi non plus” (“I love you... nor do I”): this is how the newspaper L’Express (2011, p. II) summarises the relationship of Luxembourg to its neighbouring countries. On the one hand, the ... [more ▼]

“Je t’aime, moi non plus” (“I love you... nor do I”): this is how the newspaper L’Express (2011, p. II) summarises the relationship of Luxembourg to its neighbouring countries. On the one hand, the ‘economic engine’ Luxembourg offers workplaces for many commuters, positively affecting the development of this European cross-border polycentric metropolitan region; on the other hand, negative consequences such as the overcrowded real estate market in Luxembourg do not end at the national border and affect neighbouring housing markets. The ‘2020 Concept for the Region Trier’ (‘Zukunft Trier 2020’) shows that city councils perceive the proximity to Luxembourg as a chance for the development of the city (Stadt Trier/MICIC & Partner 2004). Simultaneously, locals might feel displaced due to increasing rents and house prices, and develop resentment vis-à-vis their new neighbours, coming either from Luxembourg or being nationals that moved to the border region to work in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, thus disposing of higher purchase power. Depending on the context, similar effects can thus be perceived very differently by city councils or planners and the local population. The aim of this study is to explore the consequences of the internationalisation of the housing markets within the Greater region, with a focus on the surrounding cities Arlon (BE), Metz and Thionville (FR), and Trier (DE). Therefore mixed methods will be deployed. Firstly, a quantitative analysis is planned to reveal the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the (cross-border) residential mobility. Secondly, ongoing discourses and the changes of life-worlds will be studied by reviewing guiding principles of municipal policy and urban planning documents. A quantitative analysis of local newspapers will be conducted to reflect public opinion. Discourse approaches have become common in interdisciplinary social science academic research. However, common theoretical and methodological guidelines do not exist. This project has to deal with this situation and to take into account various cultural backgrounds, heterogeneous language areas and different discussion levels. This study will help to frame today’s situation and foresees to develop sustainable solutions for future urban planning. References Express (L’) (2011): Metz, Moselle. Nos amis les Luxembourgeois. N° 3152, 2/12/2011. Stadt Trier & MICIC & Partner (2004): Strategisches Stadtkonzept „Zukunft Trier 2020“. Trier. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (6 UL)
See detailWohnmobilität in der Großregion – eine inter-urbane Diskursanalyse
Christmann, Nathalie UL

Scientific Conference (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 UL)