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See detailFactorial structure and psychometric properties of the French adaptation of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) in non-clinical participants
Larøi, F.; Billieux, Joël UL; Defeldre, A.-C. et al

in European Review of Applied Psychology = Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée (2013), 63(4), 203-208

Introduction The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) is a widely used instrument for assessing dissociation. However, there is disagreement regarding the internal structure of the DES and scores tend to ... [more ▼]

Introduction The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) is a widely used instrument for assessing dissociation. However, there is disagreement regarding the internal structure of the DES and scores tend to be highly skewed. Objective The present study was designed to test the psychometric properties of a French version of the DES in non-clinical participants, in addition to applying a response scale as recommended by Wright and Loftus (1999) in order to resolve the problem of skewed scores. Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (computed in two independent samples) suggested a two-factor solution, which seem to represent two forms of dissociation ("automatic pilot" related dissociation episodes and "defensive" dissociation episodes). Results also revealed high internal consistency, and satisfactory results in terms of skewness and floor effects. Finally, significant associations with other measures (anxiety, depression, traumatic experiences) indicate good concurrent validity. Conclusions This study offers evidence that the present version of the French adaptation of the DES reveals good psychometric properties. Analyses of the internal structure of the DES suggest that two types of dissociative experiences are being measured: automatic pilot-related dissociation episodes (e.g., associated with different types of cognitive failures) and defensive dissociation episodes that may act as defensive mechanisms, especially in persons who have been traumatized (e.g., the avoidance of a memory related to a traumatic event). © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. [less ▲]

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See detailLifetime exposure to adverse events and reinforcement sensitivity in obsessive-compulsive prone individuals
Ceschi, G.; Hearn, M.; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Behaviour Change (2011), 28(2), 75-86

A diathesis-stress perspective of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) predicts that exposure to adverse events and personality dispositions jointly influence OCS. Gray and McNaughton's (2000) model of ... [more ▼]

A diathesis-stress perspective of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) predicts that exposure to adverse events and personality dispositions jointly influence OCS. Gray and McNaughton's (2000) model of personality posits that, faced with challenging circumstances, individuals with a high sensitivity to punishment (SP) will be more prone to OCS because they cannot avoid the downward spiral into anxiety. The current study investigates OCS severity in relation to lifetime exposure to adverse events (AE), SP, and sensitivity to reward (SR) in 122 nonclinical adults. The results indicate that OCS severity is predicted by AE, SP and SR. Interestingly, the impact of adverse experiences is moderated by SR and not SP. These findings suggest that: (1) exposure to adverse events and SP are independent OCS risk factors, and (2) exposure to adverse events is more critical for reward dependent people. This is discussed in light of responsibility and 'not just right experiences' in OCS, along with the role of impulsivity in the obsessivecompulsive disorder spectrum. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes impulsivity relate to perceived dependence on and actual use of the mobile phone?
Billieux, Joël UL; Van der Linden, M.; D'Acremont, M. et al

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2007), 21(4), 527-537

Several authors have studied the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. large debts incurred by young people, banned or dangerous use of cellular phones). The aim of this study is to ... [more ▼]

Several authors have studied the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. large debts incurred by young people, banned or dangerous use of cellular phones). The aim of this study is to analyse whether impulsivity, which has often been related to various forms of addictive behaviours, is associated with massive use of and dependence on the mobile phone. In this study, 108 female undergraduate psychology students were screened using a questionnaire evaluating actual use of and perceived dependence on the mobile phone, and with the French adaptation of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. This scale identifies four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviour: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation Seeking. The results showed that a relationship can be established between the use of and perceived dependence on the cellular phone and two facets of impulsivity: Urgency and lack of Perseverance. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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