References of "Caudron, Corentin"
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See detailTemporal Changes of Seismic Velocity Caused by Volcanic Activity at Mt. Etna Revealed by the Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise
De Plaen, Raphael S. M.; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavo', Flavio et al

in Frontiers in Earth Science (2019), 6

On active volcanoes, ambient noise-based seismic interferometry, able to detect very slight variations in seismic velocity associated with magma transport towards the surface, can be a very useful ... [more ▼]

On active volcanoes, ambient noise-based seismic interferometry, able to detect very slight variations in seismic velocity associated with magma transport towards the surface, can be a very useful monitoring tool. In this work, we performed the autocorrelation of ambient seismic noise recorded at Mt. Etna volcano, by three stations located close to the active summit craters, during April 2013 - October 2014. Such an interval was chosen because of the number and variety of eruptions. The method implemented to perform autocorrelation was the phase cross-correlation, which does not require normalization of the signals. The detected seismic velocity variations were very consistent for all three stations throughout the study period, mainly ranging between 0.3 and -0.2%, and were time-related to both sequences of paroxysmal eruptions and more effusive activities. In particular, we observed seismic velocity decreases accompanying paroxysmal eruptions, suggesting an intense pressurization within the plumbing system, which created an area of extensional strain with crack openings. It is worth noting that classical cross-station approach failed to detect seismic velocity changes related to volcano activity. In addition, seismic velocity variations over time were integrated with ground deformation data recorded by GPS stations and volcanic tremor centroid locations. Finally, we showed that, although the investigated frequency band (1-2 Hz) contains most of the volcanic tremor energy, our results did not indicate a particular contamination of seismic velocity variation measurements by variations of tremor sources. [less ▲]

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See detailThe gravity of geophysics
Van Camp, Michel; de Viron, Olivier; Watlet, Arnaud et al

in EOS : Transactions, American Geophysical Union (2017), 98

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See detailGeophysics From Terrestrial Time-Variable Gravity Measurements
Van Camp, Michel; de Viron, Olivier; Watlet, Arnaud et al

in Reviews of Geophysics (2017), 55

In a context of global change and increasing anthropic pressure on the environment, monitoring the Earth system and its evolution has become one of the key missions of geosciences. Geodesy is the ... [more ▼]

In a context of global change and increasing anthropic pressure on the environment, monitoring the Earth system and its evolution has become one of the key missions of geosciences. Geodesy is the geoscience that measures the geometric shape of the Earth, its orientation in space, and gravity field. Time-variable gravity, because of its high accuracy, can be used to build an enhanced picture and understanding of the changing Earth. Ground-based gravimetry can determine the change in gravity related to the Earth rotation fluctuation, to celestial body and Earth attractions, to the mass in the direct vicinity of the instruments, and to vertical displacement of the instrument itself on the ground. In this paper, we review the geophysical questions that can be addressed by ground gravimeters used to monitor time-variable gravity. This is done in relation to the instrumental characteristics, noise sources, and good practices. We also discuss the next challenges to be met by ground gravimetry, the place that terrestrial gravimetry should hold in the Earth observation system, and perspectives and recommendations about the future of ground gravity instrumentation. [less ▲]

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See detailSingle station Monitoring of Volcanoes Using Seismic ambient noise
De Plaen, Raphaël UL; Lecocq, Thomas; Caudron, Corentin et al

Poster (2016, December 16)

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See detailSingle station monitoring of volcanoes using seismic ambient noise
De Plaen, Raphaël UL; Lecocq, Thomas; Caudron, Corentin et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2016)

Seismic ambient noise cross correlation is increasingly used to monitor volcanic activity. However, this method is usually limited to volcanoes equipped with large and dense networks of broadband stations ... [more ▼]

Seismic ambient noise cross correlation is increasingly used to monitor volcanic activity. However, this method is usually limited to volcanoes equipped with large and dense networks of broadband stations. The single station approach may provide a powerful and reliable alternative to the classical “cross-stations” approach when measuring variation of seismic velocities. We implemented it on the Piton de la Fournaise in Reunion Island, a very active volcano with a remarkable multi-disciplinary continuous monitoring. Over the past decade, this volcano was increasingly studied using the traditional cross-correlation technique and therefore represents a unique laboratory to validate our approach. Our results, tested on stations located up to 3.5 km from the eruptive site, performed as well as the classical approach to detect the volcanic eruption in the 1-2 Hz frequency band. This opens new perspectives to successfully forecast volcanic activity at volcanoes equipped with a single 3-component seismometer. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insights into the Kawah Ijen hydrothermal system from geophysical data
Caudron, Corentin; Mauri, Guillaume; Williams-Jones, Glyn et al

in Geological Society, London, Special Publications (2016), 437

The magmatic–hydrothermal system of Kawah Ijen volcano is one of the most exotic on Earth, featuring the largest acidic lake on the planet, a hyper-acidic river and a passively degassing silicic dome ... [more ▼]

The magmatic–hydrothermal system of Kawah Ijen volcano is one of the most exotic on Earth, featuring the largest acidic lake on the planet, a hyper-acidic river and a passively degassing silicic dome. While previous studies have mostly described this unique system from a geochemical perspective, to date there has been no comprehensive geophysical investigation of the system. In our study, we surveyed the lake using a thermocouple, a thermal camera, an echo sounder and CO2 sensors. Furthermore, we gained insights into the hydrogeological structures by combining self-potential surveys with ground and water temperatures. Our results show that the hydrothermal system is self-sealed within the upper edifice and releases pressurized gas only through the active crater. We also show that the extensive hydrological system is formed by not one but three aquifers: a south aquifer that seems to be completely isolated, a west aquifer that sustains the acidic upper springs, and an east aquifer that is the main source of fresh water for the lake. In contrast with previous research, we emphasize the heterogeneity of the acidic lake, illustrated by intense subaqueous degassing. These findings provide new insights into this unique, hazardous hydrothermal system, which may eventually improve the existing monitoring system. [less ▲]

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