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See detail“Don’t You Know I Own the Road?” The Link Between Narcissism and Aggressive Driving
Bushman, Brad J.; Steffgen, Georges UL; Kerwin, Thomas et al

in Transportation Research. Part F : Traffic Psychology and Behaviour (2018), 52

Aggressive drivers can make driving dangerous. Over 50% of traffic fatalities are caused by aggressive driving. Aggressive motorists make driving very dangerous. This research tests whether narcissists ... [more ▼]

Aggressive drivers can make driving dangerous. Over 50% of traffic fatalities are caused by aggressive driving. Aggressive motorists make driving very dangerous. This research tests whether narcissists are more aggressive drivers than other individuals. Narcissists think they are special people who deserve special treatment. When they don’t get the special treatment they think they deserve, narcissists often lash out at others in an aggressive manner. Narcissists might think they “own the road” and can drive anyway they want, and that other drivers should get out of their way. In the article, we conduct three studies to test the link between narcissism and aggressive driving. In Studies 1 (N=139) and 2 (N=100), Luxembourgish motorists completed a measure of narcissism and a self-report measure of aggressive driving. In Study 3 (N=60), American university students completed a measure of narcissism and then completed a driving simulation scenario that contained a number of frustrating elements. Several measures of aggressive driving and road rage were obtained. In all three studies, narcissism was positively related to aggressive driving. A meta-analysis found an average correlation of r=.35 across the three studies. This research replicates previous research linking narcissism to aggression, and extends it to a driving context. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Allure of the Forbidden: Breaking Taboos, Frustration, and Attraction to Violent Video Games
Whitaker, Jodi L.; Melzer, André UL; Steffgen, Georges UL et al

in Psychological Science : A Journal of the American Psychological Society (2013), 24(4), 507-513

Although people typically avoid engaging in antisocial or taboo behaviors, such as cheating and stealing, they may succumb in order to maximize their personal benefit. Moreover, they may be frustrated ... [more ▼]

Although people typically avoid engaging in antisocial or taboo behaviors, such as cheating and stealing, they may succumb in order to maximize their personal benefit. Moreover, they may be frustrated when the chance to commit a taboo behavior is withdrawn. The present study tested whether the desire to commit a taboo behavior, and the frustration from being denied such an opportunity, increases attraction to violent video games. Playing violent games allegedly offers an outlet for aggression prompted by frustration. In two experiments, some participants had no chance to commit a taboo behavior (cheating in Experiment 1, stealing in Experiment 2), others had a chance to commit a taboo behavior, and others had a withdrawn chance to commit a taboo behavior. Those in the latter group were most attracted to violent video games. Withdrawing the chance for participants to commit a taboo behavior increased their frustration, which in turn increased their attraction to violent video games. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (18 UL)