References of "Budach, Gabriele 50001086"
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See detailLearning around Iconic Buildings. Maps of experience in the making.
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Nichols, Sue (Ed.) Learning Cities - Multimodal explorations and placed pedagogies. (2018)

In this chapter I look at learning and how it unfolds around the engagement with iconic buildings. My observations involve children and adults who I met through a six-year long ethnographic research in a ... [more ▼]

In this chapter I look at learning and how it unfolds around the engagement with iconic buildings. My observations involve children and adults who I met through a six-year long ethnographic research in a bilingual German-Italian primary school program in Frankfurt/Germany. My initial focus during data collection (between 2003 – 2008) was primarily on bi-literacy teaching and learning and rather classic literacy practices involving reading and writing in more than one language. It gradually shifted towards learning, space and a more geo-semiotic perspective (Kress & van Leeuwen 1996, Scollon & Scollon 2003, Nichols 2011, Lou 2014) as I examined how classroom based learning connected with the wider physical and geographical space that made up the social and emotional world of the children and their families. I went back to my data and noticed a variety of activities – a selection of them will be described in more detail below – in which children and adults interacted with buildings and the built environment of the city. At closer examination of this data it became apparent that important social meanings emerged from these encounters. [less ▲]

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See detail« Les objets qui font parler ». Vers une pédagogie de la création multimodale et multilingue
Budach, Gabriele UL

in LIDIL: Revue de Linguistique et de Didactique des Langues (2018), 57

The text presents an innovative pedagogical approach combining the exploration of material objects and the use of digital technologies. Inspired by studies in multiliteracies and new materialism, the text ... [more ▼]

The text presents an innovative pedagogical approach combining the exploration of material objects and the use of digital technologies. Inspired by studies in multiliteracies and new materialism, the text explores a project of animation film making around personally meaningful objects which was conducted with Master students during a Summer School at the University of Luxembourg. Results of this study suggest that exploring material culture and animating it through digital tools can help students to penetrate complex theoretical concepts, such as “the contact zone”, and stimulate language learning, critical thinking and self-expression. [less ▲]

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See detailSuperdiversity and Language
Budach, Gabriele UL; de Saint-Georges, Ingrid UL

in Canagarajah, Suresh (Ed.) The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Language (2017)

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See detailLanguage and territorialization: Food consumption and the creation of urban Indigenous space
Patrick, Donna; Shaer, Ben; Budach, Gabriele UL

in Semiotic Review (2017), 5

In this paper we analyze two March 2010 events in Ottawa, Canada involving the preparation and consumption of seal-meat: one an Inuit seal feast, held at a Inuit community center, in which raw seal was ... [more ▼]

In this paper we analyze two March 2010 events in Ottawa, Canada involving the preparation and consumption of seal-meat: one an Inuit seal feast, held at a Inuit community center, in which raw seal was carved and eaten in accordance with traditional Inuit practices; the other a “seal lunch”, held in the Parliamentary Dining Room for Members of Parliament, in support of the Canadian seal-hunt. Methodologically, we make use of both participatory action research and detailed textual analysis of media reports, and frame our analysis in terms of moral geographies, social and cultural values associated with food, and meaning-making systems embedded in discourses, which serve to construct and constitute particular power relations. Doing so leads us to claim that the two seal-meal events drew on and conveyed radically different meanings. The Inuit meal, though not overtly political, represented an act of food sovereignty and a claim to Inuit territoriality in the city. The Parliamentary seal lunch, by contrast, had a clear political aim, as a form of protest against the European Union decision to ban seal meat and other products. Yet, while purporting to support Inuit seal-hunting, the Parliamentary meal effectively communicated the utter foreignness of seal meat and Inuit foodways with respect to Western tastes and discourses about food and environmentalism—a fact that emerges through our ethnographic and media analysis of the two seal lunch events. [less ▲]

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See detailObjects and language in transcontextual communication
Kell, Cathy; Patrick, Donna; Budach, Gabriele UL

in Social Semiotics (2015), 25(4), 387-532

Contributions to this special issue explore the role of objects and language in communication across contexts from interdisciplinary angles, including sociolinguistics, education, anthropology and ... [more ▼]

Contributions to this special issue explore the role of objects and language in communication across contexts from interdisciplinary angles, including sociolinguistics, education, anthropology and sociology. The case studies range from medical to educational settings and investigate how meaning is constructed and projected withing and across contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailObjects and language in transcontextual communication
Budach, Gabriele UL; Kell, Cathy; Patrick, Donna

in Social Semiotics (2015), 25(4), 387-400

The text reviews critically the absence of a perspective on materiality (and objects) in most current sociolinguistic research. The authors discuss what an object-oriented perspective can offer for ... [more ▼]

The text reviews critically the absence of a perspective on materiality (and objects) in most current sociolinguistic research. The authors discuss what an object-oriented perspective can offer for humanities and social science research. Highlighting the role of objects in human interaction, they identify three types of objects (bounded, boundary and bonding) that have emerged from the case studies in this volume as playing a crucial part in trans-contextual meaning making. [less ▲]

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See detail"Talk around objects": designing trajectories of belonging in an urban Inuit community
Budach, Gabriele UL; Patrick, Donna; Mackey, Teevi

in Social Semiotics (2015), 25(4), 446-464

In this study, we present findings from a collaborative ethnographic study with urban Inuit in Ottawa, Canada. We investigate “talk around objects” as a meaningful learning activity and a prism of human ... [more ▼]

In this study, we present findings from a collaborative ethnographic study with urban Inuit in Ottawa, Canada. We investigate “talk around objects” as a meaningful learning activity and a prism of human-object relationships. Focusing on Inuit clothing – namely the Inuit-made parka (winter coat) and amauti (a traditional Inuit baby carrier) – we examine the impact of everyday objects on social interaction, with a particular emphasis on the effects of materiality on talk. More specifically, we explore the role of objects and object design in mobilizing particular forms of narratives, which project meaning across contexts of time, space, activity, and generations. Accordingly, we conceptualize the impact of objects as “joins” in trans-contextual meaning-making and point to their significance in Inuit learning and in serving to shape human-object relationships. We see the contribution of this article to this special issue as twofold. Not only does it explore “talk around objects” as an instance of coagency, in which humans and objects contribute jointly to the shaping of talk; but it also emphasizes the role of objects as “joins”, enabling and sustaining the connection of people with each other and with the environment, within and across contexts. Such a perspective relates to post-human theory, which considers the agency of things in social interaction, while acknowledging an Inuit worldview, which rejects anthropocentrism. [less ▲]

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See detailEducational trajectories at the crossroads: The making and unmaking of multilingual communities of learners
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Multilingua (2014)

This article investigates the educational trajectories of young multilingual learners in Germany. Drawing on previous ethnographic research in a primary bilingual German-Italian Two-Way-Immersion ... [more ▼]

This article investigates the educational trajectories of young multilingual learners in Germany. Drawing on previous ethnographic research in a primary bilingual German-Italian Two-Way-Immersion classroom, this study examines the continuity and fragmentation of multilingual learning as they occur in the transition from primary to secondary education. Scrutinizing conditions and ideologies which underlie these processes, I argue that, in this context, multilingualism as an educational resource undergoes a fundamental meaning shift. While in primary school multilingualism is valued as capital for social inclusion, permitting the emergence of a temporary, spatio-temporally confined bilingual community of practice (Budach 2009), secondary education emphasizes multilingualism as a form of capital for social mobility and individual distinction, which undermines the conditions for a joint multilingual endeavor. The paper demonstrates how multilingual learners cope with this educational and societal imperative, locating their own position and navigating educational options available to them. [less ▲]

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See detail“Urban-Rural” Dynamics and Indigenous Urbanization: The Case of Inuit Language Use in Ottawa
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Journal of Language, Identity & Education (2014)

The establishment of cities in Canada has played a pivotal role in the displacement, dispossession, and marginalization of Indigenous peoples. Yet, more than half of the Indigenous population now resides ... [more ▼]

The establishment of cities in Canada has played a pivotal role in the displacement, dispossession, and marginalization of Indigenous peoples. Yet, more than half of the Indigenous population now resides in cities, and urbanization continues to increase. This paper addresses a specific aspect of Inuit mobility—namely, migration and the dynamic use of Inuit language and knowledge in the city of Ottawa. Drawing on community-based participatory research in collaboration with an Ottawa Inuit literacy centre, we investigate a range of Inuit-led educational practices that emerged from collaborative work with a group of Inuit women. Suggested activities drew on semiotic resources—including objects and language—that involved retracing the migrational trajectories of Inuit between cities and between nonurban communities, particularly those in their Arctic “homelands.” Such practices appear to cut across the “urban-rural divide,” particularly since cities were rarely mentioned, a fact that seems to signal the irrelevance of this dichotomy for urban Inuit. In this context, the exploration of artifactual literacies—more specifically, speaker interactions that unfold around culturally meaningful objects—led to the following conclusions: (1) multilingual oracy is key to complex transcontextual meaning making; (2) spatiotemporal reference is anchored both in individual experience and in connectivity with members of a newly constituted community; and (3) there is a sharing of cross-generational horizontal knowledge, which includes the abstention from any enforcement of a linguistic norm. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom language choice to mode choice: how artefacts impact on language use and meaning making in a bilingual classroom
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Language and Education (2013), 27(4), 329342

This paper investigates the interplay of languages and artefacts as resources for meaning making in bilingual education. While previous research on classroom interaction concentrated on either code ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the interplay of languages and artefacts as resources for meaning making in bilingual education. While previous research on classroom interaction concentrated on either code switching or multimodality, here, I integrate both perspectives and propose a framework for the study of multimodal interaction embedded in a multilingual environment. The paper draws on research in a German–Italian two-wayimmersion classroom in Frankfurt, Germany. The focus of the analysis is on objects and their role in shaping language practices and social interaction. The analysis sheds light on two dimensions of a biliteracy teaching and learning event that centres on objects brought to class by learners: first, it shows how the presence of objects intersects with the conventionalised language choice practices of this classroom. Second, it looks at how interactions around objects alter habitual ways of using languages for both the purpose of teaching and for identifying people, material culture and bodies of knowledge. To conclude I argue that interactions around learner-centred objects can modify pedagogical practice and thereby challenge monolingualising language ideologies. Rather than reifying monolithic identities, social roles and bodies of knowledge, learner-centred objects invite the creation of semiotic spaces in which the multiple life worlds of multilingual learners can thrive. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiliteracies and family language policy in an urban Inuit community
Patrick, D.; Budach, Gabriele UL; Muckpaloo, I.

in Language Policy (2013), 12(1), 47-62

This study investigates the intersection of family language policy with Indigenous multiliteracies and urban Indigeneity. It documents a grassroots Inuit literacy initiative in Ottawa, Canada and ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the intersection of family language policy with Indigenous multiliteracies and urban Indigeneity. It documents a grassroots Inuit literacy initiative in Ottawa, Canada and considers literacy practices among Inuit at a local Inuit educational centre, where maintaining connections between urban Inuit and their homeland linguistic and cultural practices is a central objective. Using data from a participatory, activity-oriented, ethnographic project at an Inuit family literacy centre, we argue that state-driven language policies have opened up spaces for Indigenous-defined language and literacy learning activities that can shape and be shaped by family language policies. This has permitted some urban groups in Canada to define their own literacy needs in order to develop effective family language policies. Drawing on two Inuit-centred literacy activities, we demonstrate how literacy practices are embedded in intergenerational sharing of Inuit experience, cultural memory, and stories and how these are associated spatially, culturally, and materially with objects and representations. We thus show how Inuit-centred literacy practices can be a driving force for family language policy, linking people to an urban Inuit educational community centre and to their urban and Arctic Inuit families and homelands. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. [less ▲]

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See detailPart of the Puzzle: The Retrospective Interview as reflexive practice in ethnographic collaborative research
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Martin-Jones, Marilyn; Gardner, Sheena (Eds.) Multilingualism, Discourse and Ethnography (2012)

This chapter examines the retrospective interview as a site of knowledge construction in collaborative ethnographic research. It is argued that, as a method of qualitative research and as part of ... [more ▼]

This chapter examines the retrospective interview as a site of knowledge construction in collaborative ethnographic research. It is argued that, as a method of qualitative research and as part of reflexive practice, this kind of interview contributes substantially to the understanding of processes of changes in educational practice. By giving practitioners a voice, new knowledge as a kind of “living theory” (Whitehead & McNiff, 2006) is made available to inform and inspire educational research and practice. This chapter engages with a particular instance of a retrospective interview, that of discussing practitioners’ reflection on cross-linguistic and cross-subject team teaching and bilingual curriculum development in a bilingual two-way immersion program. It brings together three participants: two teachers from diverse linguistic and socio-cultural backgrounds and me, an academic researcher. We have been involved in a four year collaborative ethnographic study on bilingual literacy teaching and learning in a primary school in Frankfurt/Germany. As we have been closely collaborating partners for several years, my role, as researcher, in the interview has mainly been one of facilitating the reflective process and of creating the opportunity for this momentum of knowledge building. The retrospective interview is being analysed as an instance of reflection on shared practice in which knowledge about new kinds of practices crystallises in the co-constructed account of the interview participants. The analysis shows how team-teaching unfolds as a challenging collective learning experience leading to curricular innovation. The retrospective interview also emphasises the paramount role of teachers as agents of social change in negotiating institutionally based norms which have different currency in varying national contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailDonner une voix aux Inuit urbains : « Photovoice » comme une pratique de multilittératie dans la construction d’identité et de savoirs transfrontaliers
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Cahier de l'institut des langues officielles et du bilinguisme (2011), 2

This paper reports on a collaborative, action-based research project exploring multimodal literacy practices among urban Inuit in Ottawa. Working in the context of the family literacy program of the ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on a collaborative, action-based research project exploring multimodal literacy practices among urban Inuit in Ottawa. Working in the context of the family literacy program of the Ottawa Inuit Children’s centre, we examine two ‘Photovoice’ activities conducted by Inuit children, youth, and adults in 2009 and 2010. The goals of this examination are twofold: 1) to explore Photovoice as a multimodal literacy explore, reflect upon, and represent aspects of urban Inuit identity and experiences; and 2) to situate Photovoice methodologically and theoretically in the realm of ‘New Literacy Studies’, which sees literacy as a social and cultural practice, rather than a set of discrete linguistic skills to be taught, learnt, and acquired. In this way, Photovoice, drawing on the visual, oral, and scriptural modes, is seen as an ideal type of literacy activity in community-based educative contexts, such as urban Inuit in Ottawa, with wider application across contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailPedagogies in context: Perspectives on contemporary Spain
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Linguistics and Education (2010), 21(3), 244-255

[No abstract available]

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