References of "Brunner, Martin 40020336"
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See detailProfile formation of academic self-concept in elementary school students in grades 1 to 4
Schmidt, Isabelle; Brunner, Martin UL; Keller, Lena et al

in PLoS ONE (2017), 12(5), 0177854

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See detailThe relation between language and arithmetic in bilinguals: insights from different stages of language acquisition
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Landerl, Karin et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2015), 6

Solving arithmetic problems is a cognitive task that heavily relies on language processing. One might thus wonder whether this language-reliance leads to qualitative differences (e.g., greater ... [more ▼]

Solving arithmetic problems is a cognitive task that heavily relies on language processing. One might thus wonder whether this language-reliance leads to qualitative differences (e.g., greater difficulties, error types, etc.) in arithmetic for bilingual individuals who frequently have to solve arithmetic problems in more than one language. The present study investigated how proficiency in two languages interacts with arithmetic problem solving throughout language acquisition in adolescents and young adults. Additionally, we examined whether the number word structure that is specific to a given language plays a role in number processing over and above bilingual proficiency. We addressed these issues in a German–French educational bilingual setting, where there is a progressive transition from German to French as teaching language. Importantly, German and French number naming structures differ clearly, as two-digit number names follow a unit-ten order in German, but a ten-unit order in French. We implemented a transversal developmental design in which bilingual pupils from grades 7, 8, 10, 11, and young adults were asked to solve simple and complex additions in both languages. The results confirmed that language proficiency is crucial especially for complex addition computation. Simple additions in contrast can be retrieved equally well in both languages after extended language practice. Additional analyses revealed that over and above language proficiency, language-specific number word structures (e.g., unit-ten vs. ten-unit) also induced significant modulations of bilinguals' arithmetic performances. Taken together, these findings support the view of a strong relation between language and arithmetic in bilinguals. [less ▲]

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See detailPredicting first-grade mathematics achievement: the contributions of domain-general cognitive abilities, nonverbal number sense, and early number competence
Hornung, Caroline UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Brunner, Martin UL et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2014), 5

Early number competence, grounded in number-specific and domain-general abilities, is supposed to lay the foundation for later math achievement. Few longitudinal studies tested a comprehensive model for ... [more ▼]

Early number competence, grounded in number-specific and domain-general abilities, is supposed to lay the foundation for later math achievement. Few longitudinal studies tested a comprehensive model for early math development. Using structural equation modeling and mediation analyses, we studied the influence of kindergarteners’ basic cognitive abilities (i.e., nonverbal number sense, working memory, fluid intelligence, and receptive vocabulary) and their early number competence (i.e., symbolic number skills) on first grade math achievement (arithmetic, shape and space, and number line estimation) assessed one year later. Latent regression models revealed that nonverbal number sense and working memory are central building blocks for developing early number competence in kindergarten and that early number competence is key for first grade math achievement. Fluid intelligence significantly predicted arithmetic and number line estimation while receptive vocabulary significantly predicted shape and space after controlling for early number competence. In sum we suggest that early math achievement draws on different constellations of number-specific and domain-general mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailDo test takers with different language backgrounds take the same C-test? The effect of native language on the validity of C-tests.
Reichert, Monique UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Martin, Romain UL

in Grotjahn, Rüdiger (Ed.) Der C-Test: Aktuelle Tendenzen/The C-Test: current trends. (2014)

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See detailConcept maps: A useful and usable tool for computer-based knowledge assessment? A literature review with a focus on usability
Weinerth, Katja UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Brunner, Martin UL et al

in Computers & Education (2014), 78

The concept map is now widely accepted as an instrument for the assessment of conceptual knowledge and is increasingly being embedded into technology-based environments. Usability addresses how ... [more ▼]

The concept map is now widely accepted as an instrument for the assessment of conceptual knowledge and is increasingly being embedded into technology-based environments. Usability addresses how appropriate (for a particular use) or how user-friendly a computer-based assessment instrument is. As we know from human-computer interaction research, if the interface is not user-friendly, a computer-based assessment can result in decreased test performance and reduced validity. This means that the usability of the interface affects the assessment in such a way that if the test is not user-friendly, then the test taker will not be able to fully demonstrate his/her level of proficiency and will instead be scored according to his/her information and communication technology (ICT) literacy skills. The guidelines of the International Test Commission (2006) require usability testing for such instruments and suggest that design standards be implemented. However, we do not know whether computer-conducted concept map assessments fulfill these standards. The present paper addresses this aspect. We conducted a systematic research review to examine whether and how researchers have studied and considered usability when conducting computer-based concept map assessments. Only 24 out of 119 journal articles that assessed computer-based concept maps discussed the usability issue in some way. Nevertheless, our review brings to light the idea that the impact of usability on computer-based concept map assessments is an issue that has received insufficient attention. In addition, usability ensures a suitable interaction between test taker and test device; thus, the training effort required for test use can be reduced if a test's usability is straight forward. Our literature review, however, illustrates that the interplay between usability and test use training has mostly been neglected in current studies. [less ▲]

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See detailLehrerurteile sagen Lebensläufe voraus
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis et al

Scientific Conference (2013, September)

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See detailHow well does ‚general language proficiency’ explain language test performance?
Reichert, Monique UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Martin, Romain UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August 28)

The current research addresses the seemingly contradiction between the multiple findings of C-tests loading on a single general language proficiency (GLP) factor on the one hand, and the assumption that ... [more ▼]

The current research addresses the seemingly contradiction between the multiple findings of C-tests loading on a single general language proficiency (GLP) factor on the one hand, and the assumption that language proficiency as considered by language testing researchers is multi-dimensional. Research on the structure of language proficiency and in psycholinguistics suggests that GLP may best be represented as the common core across diverse language measures. In the present research, it is hypothesized that C-tests are excellent measures of this common core. In contrast, other language measures, beyond putting demands on GLP, are assumed to tap unique processes, explaining why multi-dimensionality often best reflects the structure of language measures. The current research addresses this hypothesis by examining structural equation models that evaluate alternative assumptions about the dimensionality of language proficiency. 222 students from the highest academic school track in Luxembourg completed a French C-test, as well as the Test de Connaissance du Français (TCF), encompassing measures of reading, listening, speaking and writing. The results show that the four TCF measures put extra demands on unique processes, whereas the C-test measured GLP only. The findings point out that the C-test should not be expected to replace measures of the four basic language skills, i.e., of reading and listening comprehension, or of written and spoken production, when a clear diagnostic of language proficiency in one of those domains is needed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of language on exact additions in bilinguals.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Landerl, Karin et al

Scientific Conference (2013, May)

To which degree is language involved in arithmetic and dependent on language proficiency? We investigated this question in a German-French educational bilingual setting in Luxembourg, where there is a ... [more ▼]

To which degree is language involved in arithmetic and dependent on language proficiency? We investigated this question in a German-French educational bilingual setting in Luxembourg, where there is a progressive transition from German to French as a teaching language. Due to this shift, students become increasingly more proficient in the non-dominant language (French) throughout the school years. Interestingly, the decades and units of two-digit number names follow the unit-decade order in German but the decade-unit order in French. Students from grades 7, 8, 10, 11, and German-French adults (total N = 200) solved simple and complex additions presented in different conditions: (1) visual Arabic digits, (2) auditory presentation, and (3) as a dual task in which visually presented additions were preceded by visually presented semantic judgements to indirectly activate a language context. Participants performed each condition in a German and a French testing session. Participants were asked to respond orally in the testing language. Measures include correct responses and response times. The results suggest that language proficiency is crucial for the computation of complex additions, whereas simple additions can be retrieved equally well in both languages. Furthermore, additional error analyses showed more errors on the decade or on the unit digit depending on the language of the task. However, providing a language context seems to enhance performances only in the non-dominant language. Taken together, these results support the view of a strong language influence on arithmetic. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of language on exact additions in bilingual adults.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Landerl, Karin et al

Poster (2013, April)

To which degree is language involved in arithmetic? We investigated this question in a German-French bilingual setting. In Luxembourg, bilingualism is acquired through education: mathematics are taught in ... [more ▼]

To which degree is language involved in arithmetic? We investigated this question in a German-French bilingual setting. In Luxembourg, bilingualism is acquired through education: mathematics are taught in German in primary and in French in secondary school. Interestingly, the decades and units within two-digit number names follow the unit-decade order in German but the decade-unit order in French. Forty-eight bilingual adults performed simple and complex additions. Participants had to orally respond either in German or in French. Additions were presented in different conditions: (1) visual Arabic presentation, (2) auditory presentation (in German or in French), and (3) as a dual task in which visually presented additions were preceded by visually presented semantic judgments to indirectly activate a German or French language context. The results showed that participants performed complex calculations better in the dominant language (German), while there were no differences for simple calculations. Thus, language proficiency seems to be crucial for the computation of more complex calculations, whereas arithmetic facts can be retrieved equally well in both languages. Further, adding language at the input level (auditory presentation) enhanced performances for simple calculations, especially in the non-dominant language (French), while it was exactly the opposite effect for complex calculations. Additionally, visual additions were better performed within a surrounding linguistic context (3) than alone (1) in their non-dominant language, suggesting the crucial role of the linguistic context of an addition task in bilinguals. Taken together, these results support the view of a strong language impact on calculations. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of language on exact additions in bilingual pupils and adults.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Landerl, Karin et al

Poster (2013, March)

To which degree is language involved in arithmetic? We investigated this question in a German-French bilingual setting. In Luxembourg, bilingualism is acquired through education: mathematics are taught in ... [more ▼]

To which degree is language involved in arithmetic? We investigated this question in a German-French bilingual setting. In Luxembourg, bilingualism is acquired through education: mathematics are taught in German in primary and in French in secondary school. Interestingly, the decades and units within two-digit number names follow the unit-decade order in German but the decade-unit order in French. We studied our research question in the multi-lingual educational context of Luxembourg by applying a developmental design. The present sample (total N = 200) included students from grades 7, 8, 10 and 11, as well as an adult bilingual group. This sample takes advantage of following the progressive transition from German to French as teaching languages. All participants performed simple and complex additions that they had to orally respond either in German or in French. Additions were presented in different conditions: (1) visual Arabic presentation, (2) auditory presentation (in German or in French), and (3) as a dual task in which visually presented additions were preceded by visually presented semantic judgements to indirectly activate a German or French language context. The results suggested that language proficiency seems to be crucial for the computation of more complex calculations, whereas simple additions can be retrieved equally well in both languages. Taken together, these results support the view of a strong language impact on calculations. Further results and implications will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailChildhood intelligence and adult health: The mediating roles of education and socioeconomic status
Wrulich, Marius UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Stadler, Gertraud et al

in Intelligence (2013), 41(5), 490-500

The longitudinal relation between childhood intelligence and various health outcomes in adulthood is now well-established. One mediational model that accounts for this relation proposes that intelligence ... [more ▼]

The longitudinal relation between childhood intelligence and various health outcomes in adulthood is now well-established. One mediational model that accounts for this relation proposes that intelligence has cumulative indirect effects on adult health via subsequent educational attainment and adult socioeconomic status (SES). The aim of the present study was to examine whether and the extent to which educational attainment and {SES} mediate the impact of childhood intelligence on three dimensions of adult health in Luxembourg, a country with high-quality universal public health care. We used data from 745 participants in the Luxembourgish {MAGRIP} study. At the age of 12, participants completed a comprehensive intelligence test. At the age of 52, they reported their educational careers, SES, and functional, subjective, and physical health status. Using structural equation modeling, we investigated the direct and indirect effects (via educational attainment and adult SES) of childhood intelligence on adult health. We found that higher childhood intelligence predicted better functional, subjective, and physical health in adulthood. These effects were entirely mediated via educational attainment and SES. The mediational processes differed depending on the health dimension under investigation: Whereas {SES} was crucial in mediating the effect of intelligence on functional and subjective health, educational attainment was crucial in mediating the effect on physical health. These findings held up when considering adult intelligence and were similar for women and men. Our results suggest that even excellent public health care cannot fully offset the cumulative effects of childhood intelligence on adult health. Further studies are needed to investigate the relative importance of different mediators in the intelligence–health relation while including a broader set of objective health measures. [less ▲]

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See detailPISA proficiency scores predict educational outcomes
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Preckel, Franzis et al

in Learning & Individual Differences (2013), 24

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See detailDo teacher judgments of student intelligence predict life outcomes?
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Preckel, Franzis et al

in Learning & Individual Differences (2013), 27

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See detailDoes Childhood General Cognitive Ability at Age 12 Predict Subjective Well-Being at Age 52?
Chmiel, Magda UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

in Journal of Research in Personality (2012), 46

Drawing on a broad, multidimensional conceptualization of subjective well-being, this study examined the power of childhood general cognitive ability to predict life satisfaction, satisfaction with eight ... [more ▼]

Drawing on a broad, multidimensional conceptualization of subjective well-being, this study examined the power of childhood general cognitive ability to predict life satisfaction, satisfaction with eight individual life domains, and the frequency of experiencing positive and negative affect in middle adulthood. Data were obtained from a representative Luxembourgish sample (N = 738; 53% female) in a longitudinal study conducted in 1968 and 2008. Childhood general cognitive ability was unrelated to life satisfaction, negatively related to negative affect and satisfaction with free time, and positively related to positive affect and satisfaction with some of the life domains associated with socioeconomic success (i.e. finances, self, housing, work, or health). This predictive power persisted even when childhood socioeconomic status was controlled. [less ▲]

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See detailRevisiting the Structure of Subjective Well-Being in Middle-Aged Adults
Chmiel, Magda UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Social Indicators Research (2012), 106

Subjective well-being is a broad, multifaceted construct comprising general satisfaction with life, satisfaction with life domains (health, family, people, free time, self, housing, work, and finances ... [more ▼]

Subjective well-being is a broad, multifaceted construct comprising general satisfaction with life, satisfaction with life domains (health, family, people, free time, self, housing, work, and finances), positive affect, and negative affect. Drawing on representative data from middle-aged adults (N = 738), the authors used three different structural models to analyze the interrelationships among these facets of subjective well-being. In a top-down model, a single factor representing global subjective well-being explained the correlations found among the more specific facets of subjective well-being and exerted the strongest influence on general satisfaction with life, satisfaction with health, and satisfaction with finances. In a bottom-up model, satisfaction with the latter two domains had the strongest effect on global subjective well-being. The authors discuss the implications of their findings for research on subjective well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailÉpreuves Standardisées. Nationaler Bericht 2011‐2012
Martin, Romain UL; Brunner, Martin UL

Book published by University of Luxembourg, EMACS (2012)

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See detailAllgemeine Befunde zum Luxemburgischen Schulwesen
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Lorphelin, Dalia UL et al

in Martin, Romain; Brunner, Martin (Eds.) Épreuves Standardisées. Nationaler Bericht 2011‐2012 (2012)

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See detailBefunde zum Migrationshintergrund und zum sozio-ökonomischen Familienhintergrund
Muller, Claire UL; Reichert, Monique UL; Ugen, Sonja UL et al

in Martin, Romain; Brunner, Martin (Eds.) Épreuves Standardisées. Nationaler Bericht 2011-2012 (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (7 UL)