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See detailPsychological, cognitive factors and contextual influences in pain and pain-related suffering as revealed by a combined qualitative and quantitative assessment approach
Bustan S; Gonzalez-Roldan AM; Schommer, Christoph UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2018)

Previous psychophysiological research suggests that pain measurement needs to go beyond the assessment of Pain Intensity and Unpleasantness by adding the evaluation of Pain-Related Suffering. Based on ... [more ▼]

Previous psychophysiological research suggests that pain measurement needs to go beyond the assessment of Pain Intensity and Unpleasantness by adding the evaluation of Pain-Related Suffering. Based on this three-dimensional approach, we attempted to elucidate who is more likely to suffer by identifying reasons that may lead individuals to report Pain and Pain-Related Suffering more than others. A sample of 24 healthy participants (age range 18±33) underwent four different sessions involving the evaluation of experimentally induced phasic and tonic pain. We applied two decision tree models to identify variables (selected from psychological questionnaires regarding pain and descriptors from post-session interviews) that provided a qualitative characterization of the degrees of Pain Intensity, Unpleasantness and Suffering and assessed the respective impact of contextual influences. The overall classification accuracy of the decision trees was 75% for Intensity, 77% for Unpleasantness and 78% for Pain-Related Suffering. The reporting of suffering was predominantly associated with fear of pain and active cognitive coping strategies, pain intensity with bodily competence conveying strength and resistance and unpleasantness with the degree of fear of pain and catastrophizing. These results indicate that the appraisal of the three pain dimensions was largely determined by stable psychological constructs. They also suggest that individuals manifesting higher active coping strategies may suffer less despite enhanced pain and those who fear pain may suffer even under low pain. The second decision tree model revealed that suffering did not depend on pain alone, but that the complex rating-related decision making can be shifted by situational factors (context, emotional and cognitive). The impact of coping and fear of pain on individual Pain-Related Suffering may highlight the importance of improving cognitive coping strategies in clinical settings. [less ▲]

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See detailChronotyp und Schule : Zusammenhänge zu Leistung und affektiv-motivationalen Variablen.
Preckel, F.; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Brunner, M. et al

Scientific Conference (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 UL)
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See detailLehrerurteile sagen Lebensläufe voraus. (Arbeitsgruppe „Prädiktoren und Konsequenzen pädagogischer Einschätzungen“)
Fischbach, A.; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Preckel, F. et al

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 UL)
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See detailThe effect of number syntax on two-digit magnitude judgments in German-French bilinguals.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Ugen, Sonja UL; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2012, February)

The study examined the effect of language and presentation mode on numerical processing skills in German-French bilinguals. This bilingual combination is particularly interesting because the order of two ... [more ▼]

The study examined the effect of language and presentation mode on numerical processing skills in German-French bilinguals. This bilingual combination is particularly interesting because the order of two digit number words is inversed in both languages: decade-unit in French but unit-decade in German. Further, previous studies used written number word presentations as verbal notation to activate language, which are, however, rarely used in everyday life. The present study therefore tackled the question whether two-digit magnitude judgments are affected by the presentation mode (visual Arabic vs. auditory words) and the language (German vs. French)? Data stem from adult participants (mean age: 25,3 years) who were proficient German-French bilinguals. The within-subject design involved two-digit number pair comparisons presented visually and auditory in German and in French. In line with previous studies, participants responded faster and more accurately on compatible than on incompatible trials in the visual Arabic presentation mode in both languages (compatibility effect): In compatible number pairs, the decades and units concord to the same magnitude decision (e.g. 23_57; decade: 2<5 and unit:3<7) whereas decade and units discord (47_82; decade: 4<8 but 7>2) for incompatible number pairs. In the auditory mode, the results showed a tendency for a regular compatibility effect in German and an inverse compatibility effect in French with participants responding faster on incompatible trials suggesting that bilinguals process numerical tasks in the language of presentation similar to monolinguals using the same language. Conclusively, the results imply differential numerical processing according to the presentation mode (visual Arabic vs. auditory words) and the language (German vs. French). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (12 UL)
See detailPISA: Ziele der Studie und methodische Grundlagen.
Boehm, B.; Brunner, M.; Martin, Romain UL et al

in PISA 2009. Nationaler Bericht Luxemburg (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 UL)