References of "Blewitt, Geoffrey"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBasis functions for the consistent and accurate representation of surface mass loading
Clarke, Peter J.; Lavallée, David A.; Blewitt, Geoffrey et al

in Geophysical Journal International (2007), 171(1), 1-10

Inversion of geodetic site displacement data to infer surface mass loads has previously been demonstrated using a spherical harmonic representation of the load. This method suffers from the continent-rich ... [more ▼]

Inversion of geodetic site displacement data to infer surface mass loads has previously been demonstrated using a spherical harmonic representation of the load. This method suffers from the continent-rich, ocean-poor distribution of geodetic data, coupled with the predominance of the continental load (water storage and atmospheric pressure) compared with the ocean bottom pressure (including the inverse barometer response). Finer-scale inversion becomes unstable due to the rapidly increasing number of parameters which are poorly constrained by the data geometry. Several approaches have previously been tried to mitigate this, including the adoption of constraints over the oceanic domain derived from ocean circulation models, the use of smoothness constraints for the oceanic load, and the incorporation ofGRACEgravity field data. However, these methods do not provide appropriate treatment of mass conservation and of the ocean’s equilibrium-tide response to the total gravitational field. Instead,we propose a modified set of basis functions as an alternative to standard spherical harmonics. Our basis functions allow variability of the load over continental regions, but impose global mass conservation and equilibrium tidal behaviour of the oceans. We test our basis functions first for the efficiency of fitting to realistic modelled surface loads, and then for accuracy of the estimates of the inferred load compared with the known model load, using synthetic geodetic displacements with real GPS network geometry. Compared to standard spherical harmonics, our basis functions yield a better fit to the model loads over the period 1997–2005, for an equivalent number of parameters, and provide a more accurate and stable fit using the synthetic geodetic displacements. In particular, recovery of the low-degree coefficients is greatly improved. Using a nine-parameter fit we are able to model 58 per cent of the variance in the synthetic degree-1 zonal coefficient time-series, 38–41 per cent of the degree-1 non-zonal coefficients, and 80 per cent of the degree-2 zonal coefficient. An equivalent spherical harmonic estimate truncated at degree 2 is able to model the degree-1 zonal coefficient similarly (56 per cent of variance), but only models 59 per cent of the degree-2 zonal coefficient variance and is unable to model the degree-1 non-zonal coefficients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGeocenter motions from GPS: A unified observation model
Lavallée, David A.; van Dam, Tonie UL; Blewitt, Geoffrey et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (2006), 111(B05), 1-66

We test a unified observation model for estimating surface-loading-induced geocenter motion using GPS. In principle, this model is more complete than current methods, since both the translation and ... [more ▼]

We test a unified observation model for estimating surface-loading-induced geocenter motion using GPS. In principle, this model is more complete than current methods, since both the translation and deformation of the network are modeled in a frame at the center of mass of the entire Earth system. Real and synthetic data for six different GPS analyses over the period 1997.25–2004.25 are used to (1) build a comprehensive appraisal of the errors and (2) compare this unified approach with the alternatives. The network shift approach is found to perform particularly poorly with GPS. Furthermore, erroneously estimating additional scale changes with this approach can suggest an apparently significant seasonal variation which is due to real loading. An alternative to the network shift approach involves modeling degree-1 and possibly higher-degree deformations of the solid Earth in a realization of the center of figure frame. This approach is shown to be more robust for unevenly distributed networks. We find that a unified approach gives the lowest formal error of geocenter motion, smaller differences from the true value when using synthetic data, the best agreement between five different GPS analyses, and the closest (submillimeter) agreement with the geocenter motion predicted from loading models and estimated using satellite laser ranging. For five different GPS analyses, best estimates of annual geocenter motion have a weighted root-mean-square agreement of 0.6, 0.6, and 0.8 mm in amplitude and 21°, 22°, and 22° in phase for x, y, and z, respectively. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of gravitational consistency and mass conservation on seasonal surface mass loading models
Clarke, Peter J.; Lavallée, David A.; Blewitt, Geoffrey et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2005), 32(L08306), 1-5

Increasingly, models of surface mass loads are used either to correct geodetic time coordinates by removing seasonal and other ‘‘noise’’, or for comparison with other geodetic parameters. However, models ... [more ▼]

Increasingly, models of surface mass loads are used either to correct geodetic time coordinates by removing seasonal and other ‘‘noise’’, or for comparison with other geodetic parameters. However, models of surface loading obtained by simply combining the mass redistribution due to individual phenomena will not in general be self- consistent, in that (i) the implied global water budget will not be mass-conserving, and (ii) the modelled sea level will not be an equipotential surface of Earth’s total gravity field. We force closure of the global water budget by allowing the ‘‘passive’’ ocean to change in mass. This medium-term passive ocean response will not be a uniform change in non- steric ocean surface height, but must necessarily be spatially variable to keep the ‘‘passive’’ ocean surface on an equipotential. Using existing load models, we demonstrate the effects of our consistency theory. Geocenter motion is amplified significantly, by up to 43%. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (3 UL)
See detailThe New IERS Special Bureau for Loading (SBL)
van Dam, Tonie UL; Plag, Hans-Peter; Blewitt, Geoffrey et al

in International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: General Meeting Proceedings (2002)

Currently, the establishment of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) Special Bureau for Loading (SBL) is in progress as part of the IERS Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC). The main ... [more ▼]

Currently, the establishment of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) Special Bureau for Loading (SBL) is in progress as part of the IERS Global Geophysical Fluids Center (GGFC). The main purpose of the SBL is to provide reliable, consistent model predictions of loading signals that have been thoroughly tested and validated. The products will describe at least the surface deformation, gravity signal and geo-center variations due to the various surface loading processes in reference frames relevant for direct comparison with existing geodetic observing techniques. To achieve these goals, major scientific advances are required with respect to the Earth model, the theory and algorithms used to model deformations of the Earth as well as improvements in the observational data related to surface loading. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCrustal displacements due to continental water loading
van Dam, Tonie UL; Wahr, J.; Milly, P. C. D. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2001), 28(4), 651-654

The effects of long-wavelength (>100 km), seasonal variability in continental water storage on vertical crustal motions are assessed. The modeled vertical displacements (ΔrM) have root-mean-square (RMS ... [more ▼]

The effects of long-wavelength (>100 km), seasonal variability in continental water storage on vertical crustal motions are assessed. The modeled vertical displacements (ΔrM) have root-mean-square (RMS) values for 1994–1998 as large as 8 mm, with ranges up to 30 mm, and are predominantly annual in character. Regional strains are on the order of 20 nanostrain for tilt and 5 nanostrain for horizontal deformation. We compare ΔrM with observed Global Positioning System (GPS) heights (ΔrO) (which include adjustments to remove estimated effects of atmospheric pressure and annual tidal and non-tidal ocean loading) for 147 globally distributed sites. When the ΔrO time series are adjusted by ΔrM, their variances are reduced, on average, by an amount equal to the variance of the ΔrM. Of the ΔrO time series exhibiting a strong annual signal, more than half are found to have an annual harmonic that is in phase and of comparable amplitude with the annual harmonic in the ΔrM. The ΔrM time series exhibit long-period variations that could be mistaken for secular tectonic trends or postglacial rebound when observed over a time span of a few years. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetection of atmospheric pressure loading using the Global Positioning System
van Dam, Tonie UL; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, M.

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1994), 99(B12), 23939-23950

Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in ... [more ▼]

Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65°), with a signal RMS of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with ∼65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 154 (10 UL)