References of "Bar-Haim, Eyal 50008961"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSecond-Chance Alternatives and Maintained Inequality in Access to Higher Education in Israel
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Blank, Carmel

in Social Inclusion (2019), 7(1), 28-37

Abstract Access to higher education (HE) has a long history. To offer a view on the current debates and worldwide issues regarding access to HE, this editorial depicts how the control of educational ... [more ▼]

Abstract Access to higher education (HE) has a long history. To offer a view on the current debates and worldwide issues regarding access to HE, this editorial depicts how the control of educational access has historically been used as an instrument of governance at the interface of two processes: social stratification and the territorialisation of politics. Access to HE has remained embedded in these large structural processes even though HE has expanded from a highly elitist institution into mass education systems with equity of educational opportunities having become a desirable goal across societies. Analysing these processes helps understand the complex mechanisms producing inequalities in HE today, which are brought together by the ten articles composing this special issue. Tacking stock of how inequalities in access are produced in different continents, countries, HE Institutions, applying to different social groups though evolving mechanisms, these articles document the importance of contrasting methodological and theoretical approaches to produce comprehensive knowledge on this sensitive issue for democratic societies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMore Necessary and Less Sufficient: An Age-Period-Cohort Approach to Overeducation in Comparative Perspective
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

in Higher Education (2019)

In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or ... [more ▼]

In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or overeducation. Surprisingly, decreasing occupational outcomes do not coincide empirically with the economic returns among those with tertiary education. Regarding the process of changes in economic returns to education based on cohort transformations, we expect that the expansion of tertiary education affects specific cohorts, which find themselves facing more labor market competition. As a result, the economic returns to education should decrease among younger cohorts even when the overall returns to education remain stable over time. To study this process, we model economic returns with a new age-period-cohort-trended lag (APCTLAG) method, which allows us to compare the gap in economic returns between tertiary and less than tertiary education over cohorts. Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), we analyze trends over three decades in 12 countries. Our results confirm that educational returns for tertiary education have declined over time, even though the gap between the educated and the less educated has remained similar in most of the countries. For younger cohorts, tertiary education has become more necessary to survive in the competitive labor market, but the actual economic returns have decreased—making tertiary education less sufficient than before. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA cohort perspective on intergenerational mobility and inequality
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

in Long-term consequences of the Great Recession for stratification, mobility and inequality. Abstracts booklet. (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTaking Their Place: Educational Expansion and Inequality of Educational Opportunities—A Gendered Perspective
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; BLANK, Carmel; Rotman, Assaf

in Higher Education Policy (2018)

Educational expansion and gender differences in educational attainment have both been studied in various contexts, but their interdependence has rarely been examined, and even then, yielded conflicting ... [more ▼]

Educational expansion and gender differences in educational attainment have both been studied in various contexts, but their interdependence has rarely been examined, and even then, yielded conflicting results. We focus on the expansion of tertiary education in Israel resulting from several reforms introduced in the mid-1990s and ask two questions: (a) How did educational expansion affect inequality of opportunity (IEO)? (b) Did the effect of educational expansion differ between men and women? Based on the Israeli census, we examine changes in IEO between 1995 and 2008 across all levels of education. We find that women from lower socioeconomic background were the main beneficiaries of the expansion, especially at the MA+ level. Several explanations for these findings are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (5 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlobal inequalities 1980-2050: a microdata oriented simulation – Worldsim
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Hartung, Anne UL et al

Scientific Conference (2018, July 13)

Former global inequality models lack realistic features of the population (age, gender, education, behavior). Worldsim develops a panel sample based simulation of the world population until 2050, relying ... [more ▼]

Former global inequality models lack realistic features of the population (age, gender, education, behavior). Worldsim develops a panel sample based simulation of the world population until 2050, relying on UN, Cepii, etc, big data aggregated forecasts, that we individually disaggregate. The simulation confirms the decline of the world's Gini index, but underlines several paradoxes in the socioecodemography of the world, with increasing gaps between resources and needs. Compared to more standard socioeconomic simulations of inequalities, we provide more substantial characterization of the population, and compared to other global simulations, we capture the dimensions of social divergences between social groups and geographic regions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (7 UL)
See detailInequality and generations - Age-Period-Cohort Modelling
Hartung, Anne UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL

Presentation (2018, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailהתרחבות ההשכלה הגבוהה, שוויון כלכלי ושוויון הזדמנויות
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Shavit, Yossi

in Megamot (2018), 53(1), 101-124

This paper discusses changes in inequality of educational opportunity (IEO) between socioeconomic strata at the tertiary level. We suggest a new approach to the understanding of IEO, which combines both ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses changes in inequality of educational opportunity (IEO) between socioeconomic strata at the tertiary level. We suggest a new approach to the understanding of IEO, which combines both economic inequality and educational expansion as determinants of change. The paper begins with a discussion of the theoretical distinction between economic inequality and inequality of opportunities and a discussion of the relationship between the two concepts. This is followed by a review of changes in Israeli higher education and economic inequality. Lastly, we analyze several data sets (ESS, ISSP and LIS) to estimate the effects of the expansion of higher education and the increase in income inequality in Israel on the IEO. We show that the failure of educational expansion to reduce IEO at the tertiary level is partially due to the contemporaneous increase in economic inequality, which has a positive effect on IEO. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe persistence of the gender earnings gap: cohort trends and the role of education in twelve countries
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Gornick, Janet et al

in Inequality Matters - LIS newsletter, Issue No. 6 (2018)

Studying twelve countries over 30 years, we examine whether women’s educational expansion has translated into a closing gender earnings gap. As educational attainment is cohort-dependent, an Age-Period ... [more ▼]

Studying twelve countries over 30 years, we examine whether women’s educational expansion has translated into a closing gender earnings gap. As educational attainment is cohort-dependent, an Age-Period-Cohort analysis is most appropriate in our view. Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) data, we show that while in terms of attainment of tertiary education women have caught up and often even outperform men, substantial gender differences in earnings persist in all countries. These results are consistent with the composition of the top earnings decile. Using Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition methods, we demonstrate that the role of education in explaining the gender earnings gap has been limited and even decreased over cohorts. Contrary, employment status as well as occupation explain a more substantial part in all countries. We conclude that earnings differences at levels far from gender equality likely also persist in the future, even if the “rise of women” in terms of education continues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 230 (15 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreasing Inequality in Joint Income and Wealth Distributions in the United States, 1995 to 2013
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Hartung, Anne UL et al

in Conference Online Programme & Papers (2018, May)

The study of joint income and wealth distributions is important to the understanding of economic inequality. However, these are extremely skewed variables that present tails containing strategic ... [more ▼]

The study of joint income and wealth distributions is important to the understanding of economic inequality. However, these are extremely skewed variables that present tails containing strategic information that usual methods – such as percentile grouping – cannot easily underline. In this paper, we propose a new method that is able to provide a thorough examination of tails: the isograph and the logitrank. These tools entail a more detailed conception of inequality by describing inequality at different points of the distribution. Using US data 1995-2013 from the Luxembourg Wealth Study (LWS), we find first that income inequality increased significantly, in particular in the upper middle classes. Second, the wealth- to-income ratio measuring the importance of wealth relative to income, increased significantly. The association between high wealth and high incomes, fourth, increased as well. Based on our analysis, we can conclude that this increase in the association between wealth and income is not a trivial consequence of increasing inequality, but a stronger coherence of the diagonal at the top of the income and wealth distributions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (8 UL)
See detailMore Necessary and Less Sufficient: An Age-Period-Cohort Approach to Overeducation in Comparative Perspective
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged behind educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or ... [more ▼]

In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged behind educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or overeducation. Surprisingly, decreasing occupational outcomes do not coincide empirically with the economic returns among those with tertiary education. Regarding the process of changes in economic returns to education based on cohort transformations, we expect that the expansion of tertiary education affects specific cohorts, which find themselves facing more labor market competition. As a result, the economic returns to education should decrease over cohorts even though they remain stable and even increase during the same period. To study this process, we model economic returns with a new Age-Period- Cohort-Trended-Lag (APCTLAG) method, which allows comparing the gap in economic returns between tertiary and less than tertiary education over cohorts. Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), we analyze trends over three decades in 12 countries. Our results confirm that educational returns for tertiary education have declined over time, even though the gap between the educated and the less educated has remained similar in most of the countries. For younger cohorts, tertiary education has become more necessary to survive in the competitive labor market, but the actual economic returns to it have decreased - making tertiary education less sufficient than before. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDisciplines and the Categorization of Scientific Truth: The Case of Social Sciences in the Hebrew Wikipedia
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL

in Journal of Sociocybernetics (2018), 15(2), 20-37

For the general audience, Wikipedia is considered the source of “truth,” especially for scientific knowledge. While studies of Wikipedia usually focus on the accuracy of the knowledge within it, few ... [more ▼]

For the general audience, Wikipedia is considered the source of “truth,” especially for scientific knowledge. While studies of Wikipedia usually focus on the accuracy of the knowledge within it, few studies have explored its hierarchy and categorization. This study aims to describe how scientific information is organized into disciplines in Wikipedia. I take as a case study the Hebrew Wikipedia and examine the representation and interrelations of five social sciences: sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, and psychology. I gather data from Wikipedia entries categorized under each of these disciplines and create a network that contains categories and subcategories derived from these entries. Using network analysis techniques, I estimate the strength of the relations between the disciplines. Results indicated that while sociology, anthropology, and political science are strongly linked to each other, psychology and economics are relatively isolated. As there is a hierarchical difference between these disciplines, the result is a hierarchical value of the scientific knowledge presented in these Wikipedia entries. An interesting case is the distance between economics and sociology, since under the subcategory “Inequality,” the entries are uniquely categorized under sociology or economics but rarely under both categories. I claim this is an example of a fractal walking the distinction between the two disciplines. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStill Great: Subjective Intergenerational Mobility and Income Inequality
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL

in Comparative Sociology (2018), 17(5), 496-518

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClosing or Persisting Gender Gap? A Cohort Analysis of Education and Wages in the United States and Europe
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL

in Population Association of America - PAA Annual Meeting 2017 (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (9 UL)