References of "Albert, Isabelle 50000108"
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See detailFamiliale Generationsbeziehungen (international)
Albert, Isabelle UL; Schwarz, Beate; Mayer, Boris et al

in Ecarius, Jutta; Schierbaum, Anja (Eds.) Handbuch Familie: Bildung, Erziehung und sozialpädagogische Arbeitsfelder (in press)

Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen im Kulturvergleich. Nach einer Einführung in grundlegende theoretische Modelle und Forschungstraditionen werden im ... [more ▼]

Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen im Kulturvergleich. Nach einer Einführung in grundlegende theoretische Modelle und Forschungstraditionen werden im zweiten Teil Forschungsprojekte und -ergebnisse zur Ausgestaltung von Generationsbeziehungen in verschiedenen kulturellen Kontexten und im Zusammenhang mit Migration aufgezeigt sowie die Bedeutung von gesellschaftlichen Rahmenbedingungen für die Ausgestaltung von familiären Generationsbeziehungen dargelegt. [less ▲]

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See detailAkkulturation als Integrationsressource
Maehler, Débora; Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Pickel, Gert; Decker, Oliver; Kailitz, Steffen (Eds.) et al Handbuch Integration (in press)

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See detail“That’s a value I would transmit in some way, but how concretely, I don’t know” – Intergenerational value transfer revisited in light of memory
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Boulanger, Dany

in Wagoner, Brady; Bresco, I.; Zadeh, S. (Eds.) Memory in the Wild (in press)

Intergenerational value transmission occurs widely and to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. In families, children are confronted with specific practices, paradigms, rules ... [more ▼]

Intergenerational value transmission occurs widely and to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. In families, children are confronted with specific practices, paradigms, rules and routines which are part of their family culture (Albert & Barros Coimbra, 2017) and as such family is a mediator between societal/cultural and individual values. The ability to transmit values is essential for collective knowledge and memory, the continuity of value orientations being a main feature of intergenerational relations that enables members of different generations to communicate with each other (Barni, Rosnati, & Ranieri, 2013; Halbwachs, 1941/1992; Schönpflug, 2001). Intergenerational transmission of values becomes particularly complex in the context of migration or in times of rapid social change. On the one hand, family identity and traditions might provide a secure base in light of a changing context, and parents might find it important to transmit traditional values to the next generation in order to keep memories alive. At the same time, they might feel that their children should adapt to the changed cultural context, resulting in a (not always clear) dilemma about what they want for their children. How can migrant parents reconcile or move between the different collective frameworks of their culture of origin and the receiving culture (Middleton & Brown, 2005)? In the following, we will first give a brief overview over research in the area of intergenerational value transmission, and we will second illustrate and further inform our theoretical assumptions by identifying related themes and phenomena in our qualitative dyadic interviews. Then, we will delve into memory as a horizon that is emerging out of the analysis as a transversal theme. From this point of view, we continue the analysis and progressively integrate the notions pertaining to the role of memory in the intergenerational transmission of values. Aspects of cultural background are apparent in the excerpts that we will quote supporting the themes we will refer to. We will more explicitly return to this in our conclusions. [less ▲]

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See detailCross-Cultural Psychogerontology
Albert, Isabelle UL; Tesch-Römer, Clemens

in Gu, Danan; Dupre, Matthew E. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2019)

Population aging is a phenomenon that affects most parts of the world. According to recent data from the World Population Prospects (United Nations 2017), the number of older persons – those aged 60+ – ... [more ▼]

Population aging is a phenomenon that affects most parts of the world. According to recent data from the World Population Prospects (United Nations 2017), the number of older persons – those aged 60+ – has reached 962 million worldwide and is expected to climb to 2.1 billion in 2050. In spite of these general world trends, life expectancies differ still largely, and aging remains a highly diverse experience across the world. While universal developmental tasks are markers for older age in all societies (e.g., becoming a grandparent), expectations with regard to typical life trajectories and the timing of transitions vary. This “social clock” (Neugarten et al. 1965) or “cultural chrononormativity of aging” (Brinkmann and Musaeus 2018) is also expressed in legal regulations and policies (e.g., availability and timing of retirement schemes). Normative and nonnormative life events and their interpretation as on time or off-time might thus be defined very differently depending on the cultural (and historical) context (see also Baltes et al. 1980; Wrosch and Heckhausen 2005). This leads to one of the central questions of cross-cultural aging research: Are aging processes universals across cultures and societies in the Western, Eastern, Northern, and Southern parts of the world – or do aging processes differ between cultures and societies? [less ▲]

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See detailDynamics of Intergenerational Relations in the Context of Migration – A Resource Perspective at the Intersection of Family and School
Albert, Isabelle UL

in Psychology & Society (2019), 11(1), 28-34

Educational attainment is key for societal integration and participation. In light of growing numbers of immigrants, the question of how school success of children with migrant background can be assured ... [more ▼]

Educational attainment is key for societal integration and participation. In light of growing numbers of immigrants, the question of how school success of children with migrant background can be assured is of utmost importance, certainly for these children and their families but also for societal cohesion. Youngsters with migration background are an important resource for the future, also considering the ageing of many modern societies today. The article by Matthiesen (2019) deals with a well-known problem: migrant parents’ lacking school involvement. The acculturation situation might therefore constitute a disadvantage for children of these migrant families right from the start, especially if we assume that parental involvement has in general positive effects on their children’s school success, able to reduce behavioural problems and to foster academic achievement. The present commentary will deal with these and other questions that have been raised by Matthiesen’s (2019) article. [less ▲]

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See detailMessung von Ambivalenzen: Ambivalenzerfahrungen zwischen jungen Erwachsenen und ihren Eltern
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 12)

Die vorliegende Studie beschäftigte sich mit den Ambivalenzerfahrungen junger Erwachsener und der Rolle des Auszugs aus dem Elternhaus. Die Teilnehmer wohnten entweder noch bei den Eltern, waren bereits ... [more ▼]

Die vorliegende Studie beschäftigte sich mit den Ambivalenzerfahrungen junger Erwachsener und der Rolle des Auszugs aus dem Elternhaus. Die Teilnehmer wohnten entweder noch bei den Eltern, waren bereits komplett ausgezogen oder pendelten zwischen dem Wohnort der Eltern und dem Studienort. Ausgangspunkt war die Frage, ob sogenannte „exit options“ die Erfahrung von Ambivalenz verringern können (siehe auch Dykstra & Komter, 2010). Im Folgenden werden anhand dieser Studie verschiedene Möglichkeiten der direkten und indirekten Erfassung von Ambivalenz veranschaulicht sowie inhaltliche Ergebnisse präsentiert. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational value continuity in the context of migration: The case of Portuguese families in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2019, April 04)

The intergenerational transmission of values is not only essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations, but also within families, where ... [more ▼]

The intergenerational transmission of values is not only essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations, but also within families, where shared values constitute a part of the family identity and regulate intergenerational relations and exchange. In the context of acculturation, traditions can provide a secure base for migrants who have to adapt to a new living context. However, although parents in migrant families might find it particularly important to transmit their values to the next generation, their offspring can be confronted with diverse value orientations in the receiving culture. This leads to the question of how value continuity evolves in migrant compared to non-migrant families. Earlier studies have conceptualized the process of intergenerational transmission by drawing on the two step model of internalization by Grusec and Goodnow, with an accurate perception of the parental message and the acceptance of the message by the child as prerequisites for successful transmission. Several recent studies have provided evidence in particular for the importance of parental socialization values and parental motivation for intergenerational transmission. Taking aspects of communication and bidirectionality into account, we argue here that apart from the explicit motivation to transmit values from one generation to the next, also more implicit processes occur within the process of intergenerational value transfer. Our theoretical assumptions are illustrated by findings from quantitative as well as qualitative data collected within the framework of the FNR-funded research project IRMA (“Intergenerational Relations in the Light of Migration and Ageing”), including a cross-cultural comparison of n = 154 triads of parents and their (young) adult children from Luxembourgish native and Portuguese immigrant families in Luxembourg as well as in-depth interviews with n = 20 family dyads from both subgroups. Results show that parental motivation to transmit values was particularly high in Portuguese families, although no differences in perceived value similarity between the subsamples occurred. Concerning consensus in values, the role of motivational processes will be further explored, and effects of culture and migration will be discussed in an integrative framework of intergenerational relations in light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailWelcome or not? – Natives’ security feelings, attachment and attitudes toward acculturation of immigrants
Goedert, Christine UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL et al

in International Journal of Intercultural Relations (2019), 69

Cultural diversity due to immigration has become a key topic in many societies today. The question of how the native population experiences these developments is of prime importance for intercultural ... [more ▼]

Cultural diversity due to immigration has become a key topic in many societies today. The question of how the native population experiences these developments is of prime importance for intercultural relations and sets the base for acculturation of immigrants. Drawing on attachment and multiculturalism research, we supposed here that general and specific feelings of security might be related to more positive attitudes toward cultural diversity, whereas feelings of threat might be related to less openness. More precisely, the present study investigated how natives’ general attachment (secure or fearful) as well as their specific feelings of (cultural or economic) security might be related to their expectations about acculturation of immigrants in the multicultural context of Luxembourg. The sample included N = 134 Luxembourg nationals with an average age of M = 45.02 (SD = 17.41) who filled out an online questionnaire. Results revealed that self-reported fearful general attachment was positively related to more unwelcoming acculturation orientations. Relations between general attachment and acculturation orientations were mediated by feelings of cultural security, which had strong effects on host nationals’ (un)welcoming acculturation orientations over and above general attachment. Findings suggest that (un)welcoming orientations toward immigrants, entailing openness for cultural contact and exchange, are related to feelings of cultural and economic security which are partly biased by a general secure or fearful attachment. Feelings of security seem thus to provide a secure base for tolerance and openness to cultural diversity which are needed in order to deal successfully with the challenges of today’s multicultural societies. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerationelle Solidarität im Kontext von Migration: Gegenseitige Erwartungen, familienbezogene Werthaltungen und filiale Angst in portugiesischen und luxemburgischen Familien
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 20)

Vor dem Hintergrund einer sich am Übergang zum Rentenalter befindlichen ersten Generation von Migranten gewinnen Fragen zur intergenerationellen Solidarität in Familien mit Migrationshintergrund zunehmend ... [more ▼]

Vor dem Hintergrund einer sich am Übergang zum Rentenalter befindlichen ersten Generation von Migranten gewinnen Fragen zur intergenerationellen Solidarität in Familien mit Migrationshintergrund zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ein Verbleiben im Aufnahmeland könnte im Einklang mit kulturspezifischen Werthaltungen mit besonderen Erwartungen an die erwachsenen Kinder einhergehen. Die vorliegende Studie befasst sich ausgehend von Bengtson’s Solidaritätsmodell mit der Frage, wie sich die intergenerationelle Solidarität im Migrationskontext ausgestaltet, insbesondere welche gegenseitigen Erwartungen Eltern und erwachsene Kinder haben und wie der gegenseitige Austausch reguliert wird. Im Rahmen der vom FNR geförderten IRMA-Studie wurden mittels eines standardisierten Fragebogens Daten zur Familienkohäsion, zu gegenseitigen Erwartungen bezüglich Unterstützung und familienbezogenen Werthaltungen sowie zur filialen Angst und zum subjektiven Wohlbefinden an n = 67 in Luxemburg lebenden portugiesischen sowie n = 87 luxemburgischen Familien (Vater, Mutter und jeweils ein erwachsenes Kind) erhoben. Während luxemburgische und portugiesische Familien eine ähnlich hohe Familienkohäsion aufwiesen, zeigten sich Unterschiede in der Ausgestaltung des gegenseitigen Austauschs. Portugiesische Teilnehmer berichteten höhere Erwartungen bezüglich Kontakthäufigkeit und Unterstützung, wohingegen der Zusammenhalt luxemburgischer Familien eher durch eine generelle Verfügbarkeit bei Bedarf gekennzeichnet war. Es zeigte sich kein Mittelwertsunterschied der portugiesischen und luxemburgischen erwachsenen Kinder bezüglich filialer Angst. Während allerdings ein starker wahrgenommener Familienzusammenhalt mit geringerer filialer Angst in beiden Gruppen einherging, war ein stärkeres Bedürfnis nach Unabhängigkeit aber insbesondere bei den portugiesischen Kindern mit höherer filialer Angst verbunden. Die Ergebnisse werden unter Berücksichtigung intrafamilialer Prozesse der Beziehungsregulation im Rahmen eines integrativen Modells von Familienbeziehungen im Kontext von Altern und Migration diskutiert. [less ▲]

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See detailFamily, migration, and intergenerational solidarity
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

Migration and cultural diversity are key issues for many European countries today, and family relations are becoming increasingly important in this context. Intergenerational solidarity can have different ... [more ▼]

Migration and cultural diversity are key issues for many European countries today, and family relations are becoming increasingly important in this context. Intergenerational solidarity can have different forms and may differ across as well as within cultures. In fact, different patterns of support have been found comparing migrant with non-migrant families. In general, parents represent an important resource of support even for adult children; the other way round, offspring in migrant families have been found to provide substantial practical support for their parents such as help with administrative tasks or translations already at younger ages, and family support can become more important with increasing age when older migrants need help or care. Families migrating from more collectivist, family-oriented to more individualistic cultural contexts might find it difficult to adapt to prevalent values and practices regarding intergenerational support in the receiving society, and adult children might experience strain and difficulties in meeting their parents’ expectations. Further, the question of how families arrange intergenerational solidarity in the light of multilocality becomes pertinent as migrants are confronted with the task to regulate their relations with family members who stay in their countries of origin. The present symposium deals with these questions by use of both quantitative and qualitative methods, bringing together researchers from four European countries (Switzerland, Germany, Luxembourg, and Portugal) which are characterized by high numbers of immigrants resp. emigrants. First, Bettina Isengard, Ronny König and Marc Szydlik explore patterns of intergenerational family solidarity all over Europe, concentrating on differences between migrant and non-migrant families as well as geographical distance between family members. Second, Heike Buhl, Sabrina Sommer and Christian Hoellger have a closer look at felt obligations to support parents in a sample from Germany, thereby examining in how far migrants and non-migrants differ with regard to their adherence to family values and how these are related to other aspects of intergenerational solidarity. Stephanie Barros and Isabelle Albert focus then on intergenerational support exchange in Portuguese migrant compared to Luxembourgish families with young adult children. Finally, Carlos Barros, Luana Cunha Ferreira and Carla Crespo analyse the relationship between emigrated family members and those who stay in the country of origin, namely Portugal, focusing in particular on aspects of intergenerational support to foster well-being and cohesion. The contributions will be discussed by Elke Murdock taking into account aspects of multicultural identity and integration and their roles for the regulation of family relations. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat you give you get, or not? The effects of intergenerational family solidarity on subjective well-being
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

Much attention has been focused on intergenerational relations and family cultures as these developments are, amongst others, related to important socio-demographic changes creating a new reality for ... [more ▼]

Much attention has been focused on intergenerational relations and family cultures as these developments are, amongst others, related to important socio-demographic changes creating a new reality for families in Europe. Thus, solidarity and mutual support between adult children and their older parents are of particular interest as the exchange and “amount” of mutual support between both generations might gain importance for the well-being of each family member. Additionally, the specific context of migration can arouse special needs in terms of intergenerational support. The current study presents a cross-cultural comparison between Luxembourgish native and Portuguese migrant families, all living in Luxembourg. Quantitative data (n = 118 family triads) gathered by means of standardised questionnaires as well as qualitative data (n = 20 family dyads) collected with face-to-face interviews underlie the discussed results. Regardless of the culture, quantitative results show a higher provided social support from parents to children than the received one. However, PT children reported receiving as much as providing social support to their parents, while LU children reported receiving more support than the one they give. Further analyses will be carried out in order to differentiate between different kinds of support (financial, instrumental and emotional) making use of quantitative as well as qualitative data. Implications regarding family solidarity will be discussed in order to highlight similarities and differences between and within cultures and family generations. [less ▲]

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See detailKultur und Sozialisation
Tesch-Römer, Clemens; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Lindenberger, Ulman; Schneider, Wolfgang (Eds.) Entwicklungspsychologie (2018)

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See detailAcculturation as a success story: Theoretical elaborations, lay perceptions and empirical evidence for “successful” migration in the multicultural context of Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Poster (2018, July 04)

Acculturation research has for a long time concentrated on problematic issues related to migration, often taking a deficit approach. Only recently have researchers shifted their focus toward factors that ... [more ▼]

Acculturation research has for a long time concentrated on problematic issues related to migration, often taking a deficit approach. Only recently have researchers shifted their focus toward factors that might be linked to positive outcomes of migration and integration. The present paper will deal with the question of how individuals from migrant and non-migrant families might profit from multiculturalism and cultural diversity in a resource-oriented perspective. After a theoretical elaboration on how “successful” migration could be defined and by which indicators it could be measured, we will focus on lay perceptions of this concept drawing on qualitative interviews from the FNR-funded IRMA study (“Intergenerational Relations in the light of Migration and Ageing”). More precisely, a number of altogether n = 20 Portuguese immigrant and Luxembourgish dyads of one parent and one adult child each discussed about their experiences and views on migration and the multicultural context of Luxembourg. Finally, we will identify predictors of subjective well-being in a quantitative sample of n = 73 Portuguese immigrant families (mostly one adult child together with both parents), taking into account satisfaction in different life domains as well as social and temporal comparison processes. Analyses show that for first generation immigrants as well as for their children social downward comparisons with Luxembourgish and Portuguese peers living in the host country were beneficial for their subjective well-being, whereas comparisons with Portuguese still living in Portugal and temporal comparisons were less important. The discussion will propose an integrative model for the study of migration taking into account participants’ generation status and their migration history. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational Family Solidarity, Well-Being and Health
Albert, Isabelle UL; Schwarz, Beate

Scientific Conference (2018, April 19)

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See detailIntergenerational Solidarity in Adulthood: The Role of Family Norms in Intergenerational Support and Ambivalence
Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter

in Drustvena Istrazivanja (2018), 1

Starting from Bengtson’s solidarity paradigm, we will investigate the role of internalized family norms in intergenerational support as well as experienced ambivalence from the adult child perspective. We ... [more ▼]

Starting from Bengtson’s solidarity paradigm, we will investigate the role of internalized family norms in intergenerational support as well as experienced ambivalence from the adult child perspective. We assume that internalized family norms are an important determinant of relationship regulation as they have an impact both on the selection of specific behavior as well as on its evaluation. As a consequence, own and others’ behavior should be most positively evaluated if it is in line with internalized norms and values. In contrast, if intergenerational solidarity and support exchange do not converge with internalized norms and expectations, ambivalence might be experienced. These assumptions are examined in a sample of N = 131 middle-aged adults living in Luxembourg and Germany, who reported on their relations toward their mothers and fathers. Findings showed that normative aspects of intergenerational solidarity were less important compared to affective aspects when predicting support exchange between adult children and their parents; however, family values had a moderating role in the relation between support exchange and ambivalence. Results are discussed with respect to the centrality of values in implicitly and explicitly guiding support behavior within families. [less ▲]

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See detailRelations Between Parenting and Adolescent's Attachment in Families Differing in Solidarity Patterns
Lubiewska, Katarzyna; Albert, Isabelle UL; Trommsdorff, Gisela et al

in Social Development (2018)

To explain attachment development in adolescence in different contexts we applied the family solidarity model (e.g., Bengtson, 2001) generally used to analyze intergenerational adult children-elderly ... [more ▼]

To explain attachment development in adolescence in different contexts we applied the family solidarity model (e.g., Bengtson, 2001) generally used to analyze intergenerational adult children-elderly parents relations. The model differentiates four family solidarity patterns which were assumed in our study to occur in adolescent –parent relations, though with a different distribution. We tested a susceptibility hypothesis assuming that effects of parenting will be stronger in family patterns with higher, compared with lower, affectual solidarity. A sample of Polish adolescents, their mothers ( N=570, both), and their fathers ( N=290) was surveyed as part of the Value-of-Children Study (Trommsdorff & Nauck, 2005). Four family patterns were identified: highly affectual amicable and harmonious; and less affectual and most frequently displayed detached and disharmonious patterns. The parenting susceptibility hypothesis was supported: For amicable and harmonious families, adolescents’ perception of maternal rejection was more strongly related with their attachment compared with the other family types. Partly in line with our hypothesis, effects of paternal rejection on adolescents ’ attachment were strongest in amicable families, however, not significant in harmonious families. The study demonstrates that the relation between parenting on adolescents ’ attachment representation is influenced by the pattern of family parents –child relations. [less ▲]

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See detailMigrating Identities: Affective Dialogues Across Generations
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Lehmann, Olga V.; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Deep Experiencing - Dialogues within the self (2018)

Dialogical Self Theory recognizes the interaction between self and others. The basic nature of human condition is indeed to be in indefinite and constant interdependence with the existence of “the other” ... [more ▼]

Dialogical Self Theory recognizes the interaction between self and others. The basic nature of human condition is indeed to be in indefinite and constant interdependence with the existence of “the other” and his experiences, thoughts, practices as well as his narrations. Yet, the character and degree of these interdependencies vary and fluctuate depending on the individuals, contexts and cultures. While the external dialogue occurs between people implicated in an overt interaction, the self happens in an individual’s mind as an internal dialogue. Individuals make sense of their lives through the narratives of crucial experiences in their lives, which makes the external dialogue discernible and easier to analyse compared to the internal dialogue not that easily tangible. Though, through an intergenerational interview between an adult daughter and her mother, we will try to assess and identify their individual internal dialogues within their narratives. Hence, to that end body language and behavioural indicators such as face expressions or silent thinking will be used, which may help and serve as guidelines to assess the intergenerational dialogical interaction between mother and adult child in a migrant context. [less ▲]

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See detailLooking at relations across generations: Ambivalence in context
Albert, Isabelle UL; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Trans-generational family relations: investigating ambivalences (2018)

This chapter is the introduction of the editors to the volume Trans-generational Relations: Investigating Ambivalences. An introduction to the concept of ambivalence is given as well as a summary of the ... [more ▼]

This chapter is the introduction of the editors to the volume Trans-generational Relations: Investigating Ambivalences. An introduction to the concept of ambivalence is given as well as a summary of the chapters of the book. [less ▲]

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See detailAMBIVALENCE TOWARD PARENTS DURING THE PROCESS OF INDIVIDUATION: Being Caught Between Autonomy and Relatedness?
Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Trans-generational family relations: investigating ambivalences (2018)

The concept of ambivalence has gained considerable research interest in the last years in the study of intergenerational relationships. Lüscher and colleagues (2010) define the experience of ambivalence ... [more ▼]

The concept of ambivalence has gained considerable research interest in the last years in the study of intergenerational relationships. Lüscher and colleagues (2010) define the experience of ambivalence as an oscillation between (temporarily or permanently) irreconcilable, contradictory emotions, thoughts, wishes, and behavioral tendencies that individuals may experience in identity- and agency-relevant social relationships. Such dynamics can include simultaneous conflicting tendencies of “autonomy and dependence,” “freedom and control,” or “closeness and distance” (Lüscher & Hoff, 2013). Because intergenerational family relations are in general relatively close over the whole lifespan and not easily dissolvable, they are—according to these authors—particularly predisposed to experiences of ambivalence. In the present chapter, we concentrate on the link between perceived parental behavior and the experience of ambivalence toward parents in adolescence and emerging adulthood. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscending ambivalence: Overcoming the ambiguity of theory and practices
Valsiner, Jaan UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Abbey, Emily

in Albert, Isabelle; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Trans-generational family relations: investigating ambivalences (2018)

Ambivalence is a deeply ambiguous concept. Contributions to the present book, viewed all together, exemplify that verdict, as they are situated in the intellectual space among theory, phenomena, research ... [more ▼]

Ambivalence is a deeply ambiguous concept. Contributions to the present book, viewed all together, exemplify that verdict, as they are situated in the intellectual space among theory, phenomena, research practices, and basic assumptions about the world... [less ▲]

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