References of "Abou-Leisa, Riham"
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See detailThe mammalian Ste20-like kinase 2 (Mst2) modulates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy.
Zi, Min; Maqsood, Arfa; Prehar, Sukhpal et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2014), 289(35), 24275-88

The Hippo signaling pathway has recently moved to center stage in cardiac research because of its key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and regeneration of the embryonic and newborn heart. However, its ... [more ▼]

The Hippo signaling pathway has recently moved to center stage in cardiac research because of its key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and regeneration of the embryonic and newborn heart. However, its role in the adult heart is incompletely understood. We investigate here the role of mammalian Ste20-like kinase 2 (Mst2), one of the central regulators of this pathway. Mst2(-/-) mice showed no alteration in cardiomyocyte proliferation. However, Mst2(-/-) mice exhibited a significant reduction of hypertrophy and fibrosis in response to pressure overload. Consistently, overexpression of MST2 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes significantly enhanced phenylephrine-induced cellular hypertrophy. Mechanistically, Mst2 positively modulated the prohypertrophic Raf1-ERK1/2 pathway. However, activation of the downstream effectors of the Hippo pathway (Yes-associated protein) was not affected by Mst2 ablation. An initial genetic study in mitral valve prolapse patients revealed an association between a polymorphism in the human MST2 gene and adverse cardiac remodeling. These results reveal a novel role of Mst2 in stress-dependent cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in the adult mouse and likely human heart. [less ▲]

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See detailThe tumour suppressor Ras-association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) regulates TNF-alpha signalling in cardiomyocytes.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Zi, Min; Prehar, Sukhpal et al

in Cardiovascular research (2014), 103(1), 47-59

AIMS: Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a key role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Although cardiomyocytes are known to express the TNF-alpha receptors (TNFRs), the mechanism of ... [more ▼]

AIMS: Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a key role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Although cardiomyocytes are known to express the TNF-alpha receptors (TNFRs), the mechanism of TNF-alpha signal transmission is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the tumour suppressor Ras-association domain family protein 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) modulates TNF-alpha signalling in cardiomyocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used RASSF1A knockout (RASSF1A(-/-)) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates in this study. Acute stimulation with a low dose of TNF-alpha (10 microg/kg iv) increased cardiac contractility and intracellular calcium transients' amplitude in WT mice. In contrast, RASSF1A(-/-) mice showed a blunted contractile response. Mechanistically, RASSF1A was essential in the formation of the TNFR complex (TNFRC), where it functions as an adaptor molecule to facilitate the recruitment of TNFR type 1-associated death domain protein and TNFR-associated factor 2 to form the TNF-alpha receptor complex. In the absence of RASSF1A, signal transmission from the TNF-alpha receptor complex to the downstream effectors, such as cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 and protein kinase A, was attenuated leading to the reduction in the activation of calcium handling molecules, such as L-type Ca(2+) channel and ryanodine receptors. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate an essential role of RASSF1A in regulating TNF-alpha signalling in cardiomyocytes, with RASSF1A being key in the formation of the TNFRC and in signal transmission to the downstream targets. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and characterization of a novel fluorescent indicator protein PMCA4-GCaMP2 in cardiomyocytes.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Abou-Leisa, Riham; Baudoin, Florence et al

in Journal of molecular and cellular cardiology (2013), 63

Isoform 4 of the plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase (PMCA4) has recently emerged as an important regulator of several key pathophysiological processes in the heart, such as contractility ... [more ▼]

Isoform 4 of the plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase (PMCA4) has recently emerged as an important regulator of several key pathophysiological processes in the heart, such as contractility and hypertrophy. However, direct monitoring of PMCA4 activity and assessment of calcium dynamics in its vicinity in cardiomyocytes are difficult due to the lack of molecular tools. In this study, we developed novel calcium fluorescent indicators by fusing the GCaMP2 calcium sensor to the N-terminus of PMCA4 to generate the PMCA4-GCaMP2 fusion molecule. We also identified a novel specific inhibitor of PMCA4, which might be useful for studying the role of this molecule in cardiomyocytes and other cell types. Using an adenoviral system we successfully expressed PMCA4-GCaMP2 in both neonatal and adult rat cardiomyocytes. This fusion molecule was correctly targeted to the plasma membrane and co-localised with caveolin-3. It could monitor signal oscillations in electrically stimulated cardiomyocytes. The PMCA4-GCaMP2 generated a higher signal amplitude and faster signal decay rate compared to a mutant inactive PMCA4(mut)GCaMP2 fusion protein, in electrically stimulated neonatal and adult rat cardiomyocytes. A small molecule library screen enabled us to identify a novel selective inhibitor for PMCA4, which we found to reduce signal amplitude of PMCA4-GCaMP2 and prolong the time of signal decay (Tau) to a level comparable with the signal generated by PMCA4(mut)GCaMP2. In addition, PMCA4-GCaMP2 but not the mutant form produced an enhanced signal in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Together, the PMCA4-GCaMP2 and PMCA4(mut)GCaMP2 demonstrate calcium dynamics in the vicinity of the pump under active or inactive conditions, respectively. In summary, the PMCA4-GCaMP2 together with the novel specific inhibitor provides new means with which to monitor calcium dynamics in the vicinity of a calcium transporter in cardiomyocytes and may become a useful tool to further study the biological functions of PMCA4. In addition, similar approaches could be useful for studying the activity of other calcium transporters during excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA4)-neuronal nitric-oxide synthase complex regulates cardiac contractility through modulation of a compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide microdomain.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Oceandy, Delvac; Zi, Min et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2011), 286(48), 41520-9

Identification of the signaling pathways that regulate cyclic nucleotide microdomains is essential to our understanding of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Although there is growing evidence that ... [more ▼]

Identification of the signaling pathways that regulate cyclic nucleotide microdomains is essential to our understanding of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Although there is growing evidence that the plasma membrane Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent ATPase 4 (PMCA4) is a regulator of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, the physiological consequence of this regulation is unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that PMCA4 has a key structural role in tethering neuronal nitric-oxide synthase to a highly compartmentalized domain in the cardiac cell membrane. This structural role has functional consequences on cAMP and cGMP signaling in a PMCA4-governed microdomain, which ultimately regulates cardiac contractility. In vivo contractility and calcium amplitude were increased in PMCA4 knock-out animals (PMCA4(-/-)) with no change in diastolic relaxation or the rate of calcium decay, showing that PMCA4 has a function distinct from beat-to-beat calcium transport. Surprisingly, in PMCA4(-/-), over 36% of membrane-associated neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) protein and activity was delocalized to the cytosol with no change in total nNOS protein, resulting in a significant decrease in microdomain cGMP, which in turn led to a significant elevation in local cAMP levels through a decrease in PDE2 activity (measured by FRET-based sensors). This resulted in increased L-type calcium channel activity and ryanodine receptor phosphorylation and hence increased contractility. In the heart, in addition to subsarcolemmal calcium transport, PMCA4 acts as a structural molecule that maintains the spatial and functional integrity of the nNOS signaling complex in a defined microdomain. This has profound consequences for the regulation of local cyclic nucleotide and hence cardiac beta-adrenergic signaling. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurement of plasma membrane calcium-calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) activity.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Baudoin-Stanley, Florence M.; Abou-Leisa, Riham et al

in Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) (2010), 637

The plasma membrane calcium-calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) is a calcium-extruding enzymatic pump that ejects calcium from the cytoplasm to the extracellular compartment. Although in excitable cells ... [more ▼]

The plasma membrane calcium-calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) is a calcium-extruding enzymatic pump that ejects calcium from the cytoplasm to the extracellular compartment. Although in excitable cells such as skeletal and cardiac muscle cells PMCA has been shown to play only a minor role in regulating global intracellular calcium concentration, increasing evidence points to an important role for PMCA in signal transduction, in particular in the nitric oxide signaling pathway. Moreover, recent evidence has shown the functional importance of PMCA in mediating cardiac contractility and vascular tone. Here we describe a method in determining PMCA activity in the microsomal membrane preparation from cultured cells that overexpress specific isoform of PMCA by using modified coupled enzyme assay. [less ▲]

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