References of "Sommarribas, Adolfo 50003120"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailDetermining labour shortages and the need for labour migration from third countries in the EU
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Becker, Fabienne UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2015)

Since almost 150 years, Luxembourg depends on two kinds of migration, qualified and non-qualified, in order to deal with the workforce needs of its economy. Compared to the other EU Member States ... [more ▼]

Since almost 150 years, Luxembourg depends on two kinds of migration, qualified and non-qualified, in order to deal with the workforce needs of its economy. Compared to the other EU Member States, Luxembourg is the country with the largest proportion of foreigners; however, this foreign population is mainly composed of EU citizens. Due to its size and geographic position, Luxembourg was able to have access to a very particular form of economic migration: cross-border workers. Globalisation has also played a decisive role in the development of economic migration for the Luxembourgish labour market. The financial centre was obliged to become highly specialised in order to remain competitive in regards to other financial centres and to maintain its volume of business. In order to maintain its competitive advantage, Luxembourg needs highly skilled personnel, which the country has found, up until now, within the Greater Region. This reality is even more pronounced with regards to the labour market: the number of actives (salaried and non-salaried) on 31 March 2014 shows that Luxembourgish nationals represented only 31%, EU citizens 65% and third-country nationals only 4%. Cross-border workers from Belgium, France and Germany represented 42% of the workforce and the resident migrant population (EU citizens and third-country nationals) 28%. Cross-border workers, which consist of skilled and highly skilled labour are substantially attracted for two reasons: 1) more competitive salaries on the Luxemburgish labour market ; and 2) a geographical location which allows the commuting of cross-border workers. The attitude of the successive governments was to adapt immigration to the economic needs of the country. The government policy intends to focus on attracting highly added value activities focussed on new technologies (biomedicine and information as well as communication technologies – focusing on IT security), logistics and research. However, being one of the smallest countries in the European Union, Luxembourg has limited human resources to guarantee the growth not only of the financial sector but also of the new technologies sectors. The government introduced the highly qualified worker residence permit in the bill on free movement of persons and immigration approved by law of 29 August 2008 almost a year before of the enactment of the Blue Card Directive to facilitate the entry of third-country national highly qualified workers. However, this reform was isolated and incomplete and took place without making a real evaluation of the workforce demand of the different sectors of the economy. Even though until now Luxembourg has been relying on the workforce from the Greater Region, for some socio-economic and political stakeholders, highly qualified workforces began to become scarce in the Greater region. In addition to the cross-border workers, the lifting of restrictions to access all the sectors of the labour market for citizens of the new Member States (EU-8) can be considered as a mitigating factor for the need to make an evaluation of the workforce demand, because the high salaries paid in Luxembourg became a real pull factor for the highly qualified workers. As a consequence, the political authorities did not foresee a systematic plan on how to address labour shortages in specific sectors of the economy, because there has not been a significant need for doing so. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailAdmitting third-country nationals for business purposes
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Becker, Fabienne UL; Besch, Sylvain et al

Report (2015)

In Luxembourg, the amended law of 29 August 2008 on free movement of persons and immigration does not provide a definition for immigrant investors or immigrant business owners. A third-country national ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, the amended law of 29 August 2008 on free movement of persons and immigration does not provide a definition for immigrant investors or immigrant business owners. A third-country national investor can either receive a residence permit as a self-employed worker or a residence permit for private reasons. Which one of both residence permits the applicant receives is dependent of whether s/he wants to actively work in the company s/he invests in or whether s/he wants to be a passive investor. As the global economic growth is not located anymore in Europe and in the USA but in emerging economies (i.e. BRIC countries), the government is targeting investors and capital also from these countries. An interministerial working group was set up, which prepares two drafts bills to create a legal framework for attracting third-country national investors and business managers in Luxembourg. This working group is composed of the Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of Economy (General Directorate of Small and Medium-Sized enterpises) and the Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (Directorate of Immigration). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailMIGRANT ACCESS TO SOCIAL SECURITY: POLICIES AND PRACTICE IN LUXEMBOURG
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Besch, Sylvain; Baltes, Christel UL

Report (2014)

The social security system in Luxembourg is in principle a contributory-based system different to other countries, which have a residence-based system. The social protection system is composed of three ... [more ▼]

The social security system in Luxembourg is in principle a contributory-based system different to other countries, which have a residence-based system. The social protection system is composed of three major branches: a) Social security: This branch comprehends healthcare, sick cash benefits, maternity and paternity leave benefits, accidents at work and occupational diseases, long-term care, invalidity benefits, old-age pensions, survivors’ pensions and family allowances. The social security benefits are financed by contributions paid either by the employer, the employee or the State. We include in this branch unemployment because the employee contributes to the system. The only requirements that the beneficiary has to fulfill are the objective criteria for granting each one of the benefits. b) Social assistance system: This branch comprehends the guaranteed minimum income (RMG), which is financed by general taxation and is paid from the general budget of the State. The persons have to prove that they do not have sufficient means to live when their income does not reach a certain threshold. c) Social aid: This is considered the safety net of the system. This aid allows people in need and their families to have a life in dignity. As the social assistance system it is financed by general taxation and in principle any person residing in Luxembourg can benefit from it if s/he fulfills the criteria. This benefit is granted and distributed by the social assistance offices of the municipalities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailRapport politique sur les migrations et l’asile 2012 - Luxembourg
Baltes, Christel UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Li, Lisa et al

Report (2013)

Le rapport politique sur les migrations et l’asile destiné au Réseau Européen des Migrations donne un aperçu des principaux débats politiques et développements dans ce domaine au Luxembourg au cours de ... [more ▼]

Le rapport politique sur les migrations et l’asile destiné au Réseau Européen des Migrations donne un aperçu des principaux débats politiques et développements dans ce domaine au Luxembourg au cours de l’année 2012. Si plusieurs sujets ont dominé le débat politique général comme la gestion de la crise économique, la réforme du système de pensions, ou encore la réforme du système d’enseignement, ces questions ont été thématisées le plus souvent sans qu’un lien ne soit établi avec la situation démographique particulière du Luxembourg caractérisée d’une part, par une population composée de 43% de non-nationaux et un emploi intérieur dont la maind’oeuvre étrangère, résidente ou transfrontalière, représente 68,5%. Dans ce contexte, trois thématiques ont dominé le débat politique en 2012 - les flux migratoires en relation avec la libre circulation des citoyens de l’Union européenne, l’accueil et l’aide sociale des demandeurs de protection internationale et le débat sur la réforme de la loi sur la nationalité. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailIndividual profiles and migration trajectories of third country national cross-border workers the case of Luxembourg
Baltes, Christel UL; Besch, Sylvain; Monteiro, Joaquim et al

Report (2012)

In the case of Luxembourg, the number of CBW continuously increased throughout the years and accounted to almost 42% of the domestic labour force in 2010 . Moreover and for the same reference year ... [more ▼]

In the case of Luxembourg, the number of CBW continuously increased throughout the years and accounted to almost 42% of the domestic labour force in 2010 . Moreover and for the same reference year, Luxembourg’s nationals represented a share of 29% of the total labour force . Concretely, for 100 jobs available on the labour market, 27 were taken up by foreign residents, 29 occupied by Luxembourgers and 44 by CBWs . The present study focuses on TCN-CBWs. Indeed, if CBWs in general have been the subject of a range of studies due to their importance for the labour market in particular, TCN-CBWs have largely been ignored in public debates so far. Taking both a quantitative and a qualitative approach, the present study tries to shed some light on the main characteristics composing the profiles of TCN-CBWs. Thus, TCN-CBWs provide on average for the youngest labour force on the national labour market, the large majority are wage earners under permanent contract and highly skilled. On their motivations to work in Luxembourg, TCN-CBWs put forward in descendent order a) salary, b) possibilities for career development, c) job opportunities in Luxembourg, d) the international working context and e) the professional network . The study also enquires on their integration, migration trajectories and discrimination aspects and leads us to the conclusion that migration histories are eclectic and individual. Even if some traits can be common, such as being highly skilled, their live paths differ in many ways. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailImmigration of International Students to the EU - Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Baltes-Löhr, Christel UL; Besch, Sylvain

Report (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailÉtablissement de l'identité pour la protection internationale: Défis et pratiques
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Koch, Anne UL; Baltes, Christel UL

Report (2012)

L'objectif principal de la Convention de Genève et de la directive 2004/83/CE est d'accorder l'asile et la protection subsidiaire (protection internationale) aux personnes qui ont réellement besoin de ... [more ▼]

L'objectif principal de la Convention de Genève et de la directive 2004/83/CE est d'accorder l'asile et la protection subsidiaire (protection internationale) aux personnes qui ont réellement besoin de protection, d'assurer que tous les États membres appliquent des critères communs pour l'identification des personnes ainsi que d'assurer un niveau minimal d'avantages à ces personnes dans tous les États membres. Afin de décider si un demandeur remplit les conditions pour bénéficier de la protection internationale, les autorités nationales doivent prendre en compte tous les éléments présentés lors de la demande. Un élément essentiel de toute demande est l'identité et/ou la nationalité du demandeur de protection internationale, permettant aux autorités d’évaluer les déclarations du demandeur par rapport aux raisons pour demander la protection internationale, et éviter ainsi l'octroi du statut de protection internationale aux personnes qui ne remplissent pas les conditions requises ou qui utilisent abusivement le système d'asile pour d’autres raisons, p.ex. de nature économique. Au Luxembourg, la procédure de vérification/établissement de l'identité dans le cadre de la protection internationale est séparée de la procédure de prise de décision en tant que telle. Alors que le pouvoir d'accorder le statut de protection internationale incombe au Ministère de l'Immigration, la Police judiciaire est chargée de la vérification/l'établissement de l'identité (article 8 de la Loi du 5 mai 2006 sur le droit d'asile). À cet effet, le demandeur est interrogé sur son itinéraire de voyage, y compris sur le passage de la frontière et les moyens de transports utilisés pour arriver au Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailAbus du droit au regroupement familial: mariages de complaisance et fausses déclarations de parenté
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Besch, Sylvain; Baltes, Christel UL

Report (2012)

Les mariages de complaisance représentent un phénomène rencontré dans plusieurs sociétés, étant cependant très controversé dans la société occidentale. L’institution du mariage a changé depuis l’entrée en ... [more ▼]

Les mariages de complaisance représentent un phénomène rencontré dans plusieurs sociétés, étant cependant très controversé dans la société occidentale. L’institution du mariage a changé depuis l’entrée en vigueur du Code civil luxembourgeois le 27 mars 1808. Les mariages de complaisance peuvent être utilisés, par les ressortissants de pays tiers, comme un moyen de contourner les obstacles pour entrer dans l’Union européenne en prétextant le regroupement familial. Les voies légales de migration se font rares puisque la législation sur la migration des ressortissants de pays tiers vers l’Union européenne est devenue plus restrictive. Globalement, il n’existe que deux voies légales pour les ressortissants de pays tiers qui ne correspondent pas à l’image de la migration que le Luxembourg promeut (migrations des travailleurs et chercheurs hautement qualifiés) mais qui restent valables : la protection internationale et le regroupement familial. Le droit d’asile et le droit à la vie familiale sont des droits fondamentaux que les États membres ne peuvent pas restreindre sans une approche proportionnelle fait conforme à plusieurs reprises par la Cour Européenne des Droits de l’Homme. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 123 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailEstablishing identity for international protection: challenges and practices
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Koch, Anne UL; Besch, Sylvain

Report (2012)

In Luxembourg, the procedure for identity verification/establishment in the context of international protection is separated from the decision-making procedure as such. While the authority for granting ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, the procedure for identity verification/establishment in the context of international protection is separated from the decision-making procedure as such. While the authority for granting international protection status lies with the Ministry of Immigration, the Judicial Police is in charge of identity verification/establishment (Article 8 of Law of 5 May 2006). For this means, the applicant will be interviewed with regard to his/her travel itinerary, including questions on border crossing and used means of transports to arrive in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailProfils individuels et trajectoires migratoires de travailleurs frontaliers ressortissants de pays tiers – le cas du Luxembourg
Baltes, Christel UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Monteiro, Joaquim UL

Report (2012)

Selon l’historien luxembourgeois Gilbert Trausch, le Grand-Duché est devenu une terre d’immigration avec son industrialisation, aux environ de 1871 . Depuis, la présence d’étrangers demeure un trait ... [more ▼]

Selon l’historien luxembourgeois Gilbert Trausch, le Grand-Duché est devenu une terre d’immigration avec son industrialisation, aux environ de 1871 . Depuis, la présence d’étrangers demeure un trait caractéristique de l’histoire sociale du pays et la pierre angulaire de ses politiques migratoires. Un des aspects plus récents de cette politique nationale migratoire a été de, à partir des années 90 , recourir à une main-d’œuvre frontalière. En effet, la Grande Région, qui se compose du Luxembourg, la Sarre et de la région Rhin-Palatinat (Allemagne), de la Lorraine (France) et de la Wallonie (Belgique), représente le plus grand espace politique transnational d’Europe et compte près de 25% de la totalité des TF dans l’UE-27, figurant ainsi à la 2e place, derrière la Suisse . Bien que, historiquement, on puisse retracer ses dynamiques et réseaux jusqu’à la période romaine et même au-delà , ce n’est qu’à partir des années 90 que la croissance d’espaces frontaliers devient progressivement visible en Europe. Pour ce qui est du Luxembourg, le nombre de TF a augmenté de façon continue au cours de ces années, pour finalement représenter près de 42% de la main-d’œuvre nationale en 2010 . En outre, pour la même année de référence, la part des ressortissants luxembourgeois dans la main-d’œuvre totale se limitait à 29% . En d’autres termes, si 100 emplois étaient disponibles sur le marché du travail, 27 ont été occupés par des résidents étrangers, 29, par des ressortissants luxembourgeois et 44, par des TF . La présente étude se concentre sur les TF-RPT. En effet, s’il est vrai que les TF ont fait l’objet de nombreuses études en raison notamment, de leur importance pour le marché de l’emploi, les TF-RPT ont, quant à eux, été largement ignorés dans le débat public jusqu’à présent. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailImmigration des étudiants internationaux vers l’UE - Luxembourg
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Besch, Sylvain; Baltes, Christel UL et al

Report (2012)

Jusqu’en 2003, le Luxembourg n’avait pas d’université. Avant cette date, la formation de l’élite du pays avait lieu dans des universités étrangères, en particulier dans les universités et établissements ... [more ▼]

Jusqu’en 2003, le Luxembourg n’avait pas d’université. Avant cette date, la formation de l’élite du pays avait lieu dans des universités étrangères, en particulier dans les universités et établissements d’enseignement supérieur de la Grande Région (Belgique, France et Allemagne). Seules certaines années d’enseignement supérieur pouvaient être suivies dans quatre établissements d’enseignement supérieur, ou dans certains établissements étrangers qui mettent en place des programmes spéciaux dans le pays (en particulier dans le domaine de la gestion d’entreprise). Cette situation a commencé à changer avec la transformation de l’économie luxembourgeoise passant d’une économie industrialisée à une économie centrée sur les secteurs des services et financiers. Le besoin en personnel qualifié et hautement qualifié ne pouvant être satisfait par la population locale a forcé le Luxembourg à continuer à dépendre du réservoir de ressources humaines de la Grande Région. L’éventuel problème de cette situation était que ce réservoir n’est pas illimité et que certaines des qualifications requises ne pouvaient pas être remplies par cette population active que l’on ne pouvait trouver qu’à l’étranger. De plus, un grand nombre d’étudiants nationaux ayant reçu un enseignement et une formation à l’étranger ont fait carrière à l’extérieur du pays. Ce sont quelques-uns des éléments pris en compte par le gouvernement luxembourgeois pour créer l’Université du Luxembourg. Ses principaux objectifs sont que l’université réponde aux besoins et aux exigences du monde académique moderne et qu’elle puisse être suffisamment flexible pour s’adapter aux réalités sociales et économiques du pays. L’Université du Luxembourg s’est centrée sur la recherche et sur une éducation de haut niveau, à vocation internationale (« ouverte au monde ») encourageant le multilinguisme et l’inter-mobilité de tous ses étudiants y compris des ressortissants de pays tiers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 215 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailVisa policy as a migration channel
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Baltes-Löhr, Christel UL; Besch, Sylvain

Report (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (6 UL)