References of "Siry, Christina 50003105"
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See detailCoteaching in science education courses: Transforming teacher education through shared responsibility
Siry, Christina UL; Martin, Sonya; Baker, Shelley et al

in Murphy, Colette; Scantlebury, Kathryn (Eds.) Coteaching in international contexts: research and practice (2010)

This chapter focuses on the implementation of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue as foundational components in science teacher education courses. Our use of coteaching emphasizes sharing responsibility ... [more ▼]

This chapter focuses on the implementation of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue as foundational components in science teacher education courses. Our use of coteaching emphasizes sharing responsibility for teaching and learning science and science pedagogy with our students1. Cogenerative dialogues are conversations between classroom participants (teachers, students, researchers, etc.) to discuss classroom interactions and focus on improving teaching and learning. Coupled with coteaching, they serve as both a method for learning how to teach, as well as a methodological approach to learn about teaching. In this chapter we present our pedagogical perspectives and explore our research into the use of coteaching and cogenerative dialogues as an approach to teacher education courses. We have implemented this approach to counter the increasing trend towards the deprofessionalization of teachers, both at the K-12 and university levels. As we detail the development of our courses over time, we provide insights into how our epistemological understandings about teaching and learning have evolved to include sharing responsibility for teaching and learning with our students and how this practice has, in turn, informed our praxis as teacher educators. Building from Freirian notions of dialogue and participatory education, we explore how coteaching and cogenerative dialogue can be utilized as a tool for engaging students in a theory generative pedagogical approach to learning about teaching. Specifically, we focus on how sharing responsibility with our students for the teaching and learning that occurs in our courses has the potential to not only transform science teacher education, but also K-12 science education. In the sections that follow, we describe what we characterize as the de-professionalization of teaching and introduce coteaching and cogenerative dialogue as an engaged pedagogical approach teacher educators can utilize to support new and in-service teachers to “push back” at policies and mandates that de-emphasize the decision-making powers of professional teachers. [less ▲]

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See detailReconceptualizing the relationship between universities and schools: a dialectic and polysemic approach
Fellner, Gene; Siry, Christina UL

in Cultural Studies of Science Education (2010), 5(3), 775-785

This review essay adds to the conversation to which Allison Skerrett and Hannah Sevian contribute in their article, Identity and biography as mediators of science and mathematics faculty’s involvement in ... [more ▼]

This review essay adds to the conversation to which Allison Skerrett and Hannah Sevian contribute in their article, Identity and biography as mediators of science and mathematics faculty’s involvement in K-12 service. Here we address the need to reconceptualize faculty service in public schools and traditional notions of scholarship. We discuss the importance of transforming university structures that envision service as less important than “scholarship” and “teaching” while mediating hierarchical ideas of what “service” entails. We share a dialectical view of social life and an ethical stance that values polysemy and polyphony both in research and in our daily interactions. Here we employ a dialectical lens that seeks multiple perspectives as we engage in a dialogue about these issues. [less ▲]

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See detailForum: Science agency and structure across a lifespan. A dialogic response
Adams, Jennifer, D.; Siry, Christina UL; Dhingra, Koshi et al

in Roth, W-M; Tobin, K (Eds.) ReUniting Psychological and Sociological Perspectives (2010)

We are a group of science educators and researchers who are culturally diverse as well as diverse in our science teaching and learning experiences. We have worked with teachers and students from the ... [more ▼]

We are a group of science educators and researchers who are culturally diverse as well as diverse in our science teaching and learning experiences. We have worked with teachers and students from the elementary through the university level. In reading the four chapters in “Science agency and structure across the lifespan,” we draw on our experiences of researching and teaching in various formal and informal settings to ask critical questions about the importance of making science education a multi-contextual, pan-cultural endeavor. What follows is a dialogic response that explores the major themes that emerged for us in the four chapters. We asked ourselves questions to deepen our understanding about science teaching and learning in different contexts such as, what is the goal of formal learning spaces? How can we bring to the forefront teachers’ roles and agency in educational research? How can we use students’ and teachers’ individual life stories to create an inclusive learning community in the science classroom? What is the role of emotions in learning science? This writing approach allows us to share our individual perspectives while we build a collective understanding of connecting science teaching, learning and educational research across different contexts and lifeworlds. [less ▲]

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See detailExpanding the field of science education: A conversation with Ken Tobin
Siry, Christina UL

in Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science & Technology Education (2009), 5(3), 197-208

This paper focuses on a conversation with Dr. Kenneth Tobin, which took place in June 2009 at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he is Presidential Professor in the Urban ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on a conversation with Dr. Kenneth Tobin, which took place in June 2009 at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he is Presidential Professor in the Urban Education Program. Our purpose was to focus on Ken’s career in science education, and to discuss the past, present, and future of his research interests. During our conversation, we explored the various trajectories of his career, focusing on the ways in which his research has evolved through the years. Further, Ken shared his thoughts on the field of science education, and provided salient advice for early career scholars. This manuscript includes an introductory summary of Ken’s career achievements to this point, a record of our conversation (the audio-recording can be downloaded at the journal’s website) and a list of selected publications that highlight Ken’s key works. [less ▲]

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See detailPreparing teachers to serve diverse learners: A PDS / full-service community school model
Ferrara, Joanne; Santiago, Eileen; Siry, Christina UL

in Guadarrama, Irma N.; Ramsey, John M.; Nath, Janice L. (Eds.) University and School Connections: Research Studies in Professional Development Schools (2008)

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See detailConceptual change research and science education practice: A response from educators
Siry, Christina UL; Horowitz, G; Otulaja, F.S. et al

in Cultural Studies of Science Education (2008), 3(2), 451-470

We discuss the eight papers in this issue of Cultural Studies of Science Education focusing on the debate over conceptual change in science education and explore the issues that have emerged for us as we ... [more ▼]

We discuss the eight papers in this issue of Cultural Studies of Science Education focusing on the debate over conceptual change in science education and explore the issues that have emerged for us as we consider how conceptual change research relates to our practice as science educators. In presenting our interpretations of this research, we consider the role of participants in the research process and contextual factors in conducting research on science conceptions, and draw implications for the teaching of science. [less ▲]

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See detailA nutritious field trip
Siry, Christina UL; Famiglietti, Jillian

in Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (2007), 39(3), 175-177

A class trip to the local grocery store is an engaging way to reinforce a unit on nutrition as students make connections between a real-life experience and their classroom learning. Research shows that ... [more ▼]

A class trip to the local grocery store is an engaging way to reinforce a unit on nutrition as students make connections between a real-life experience and their classroom learning. Research shows that students often remember a field trip well into adulthood and even recall specific exhibits and facts.1 and 2 Field trips generally bring to mind a trip to a museum, zoo, or nature center, but a field trip to a grocery store provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate their understanding of nutrition science and food choices. Research has shown that nutrition education programs can effectively improve the dietary behavior of children.3 and 4 Nutrition education in students’ elementary school experiences should focus on lessons that teach about the importance of choosing healthful food. This field trip can be connected to a unit in which students learn about food groups and ultimately work together to create a list of nutritious and healthful meal choices. It has been written for grade 3, but it can be adapted to meet the needs of older students. [less ▲]

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See detailPre-service teachers and classroom teachers learning together: A collaborative teacher education program
Ferrara, J; Siry, Christina UL

in Excelsior: Leadership in Teaching and Learning (2007), 1(2), 39-48

The field-based science methods course described in this paper uses a professional development school to enhance the professional practices of classroom teachers, pre-service teachers, and college faculty ... [more ▼]

The field-based science methods course described in this paper uses a professional development school to enhance the professional practices of classroom teachers, pre-service teachers, and college faculty alike. Participants work together to develop and teach inquiry-based science in a fourth-grade classroom. This article describes how participants are immersed in the teaching and learning of science. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching with trade books: Wonderful, wiggly worms
Siry, Christina UL

in Science and Children (2006), 43(7), 14-16

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman ... [more ▼]

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman and Janine Schaub. While the former book helps students understand the role organisms play in an ecosystem, the latter provides reference materials that can be used by students in designing experiments. With the examination of worms' body structure and behavior, students gain an appreciation of the ecological importance of worms. Experimenting with living creature in the classroom, it is equally important to follow appropriate safety guidelines including washing hands before and after handling worms. One such K-3 grade experiment is to create a worm jar to observe the tunneling behavior of worms. [less ▲]

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See detailA field guide of their own
Siry, Christina UL; Buchinski, Lisa, C.

in Science and Children (2005), 43(1), 36-39

The article presents information on the use of natural outdoor settings to develop and encourage children's appreciation and ownership of their natural environment. Whenever students were outdoors, they ... [more ▼]

The article presents information on the use of natural outdoor settings to develop and encourage children's appreciation and ownership of their natural environment. Whenever students were outdoors, they invariably asked to know the names of what they saw. Rather than simply recite plant and animal names., we pointed out identifiable features in a plant or animal and then taught students to use field guides to find out more. A project was planned for the students to teach the integration of arts and science into other disciplines and there connections to the world around them. Throughout the school year, activities in science focused on developing students' science-process skills, and this particular project focused on the skills of observing and comparing. One hundred twenty five second-and third-grade students participated in the month-long project. This age group was chosen for practical reasons: first, because their schedule went from art to science, or vice versa. This allowed for a block of an hour and a half for each student, rather than the usual 45-minute time period. Second, it was felt that this age group would be developmentally able to make generalizations about habitats and plant requirements while focusing on small differences between species. [less ▲]

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