References of "Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke 50008840"
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See detailThe nature of hyperactivity in children with hydrocephalus
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2002, October)

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See detailBehaviour problems and expressed emotion in children with spina bifida and/or hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2002, September)

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See detailDisability and quality of life in spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Kennedy, Collin; Stevenson, Jim

in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement (2002), 44(5), 317-322

This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 and 13 years with spina bifida (n=62), hydrocephalus (n=354), and spina bifida plus hydrocephalus (n=128) were identified via the register of the Association for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (ASBAH). Parents completed standardized measures of Child Health Related Quality Of Life (CQOL), family needs survey (FNS), and caregiving self-efficacy scale (CSES) as well as questions on children's health and physical ability. Results showed there were no significant differences in the overall quality of life for the three disability conditions. The overall CQOL was over 1 SD lower for those with spina bifida and hydrocephalus than for children with other physical conditions. Sex and age were not related to overall CQOL. Specific aspects of CQOL differentiated the three groups. Children with spina. bifida had poorer CQOL scores on self-care, continence, and mobility/activities whilst those with hydrocephalus had poorer scores on school activities, worries, sight, and communication. Severity of condition and family resources, i.e. CSES and FNS, predicted 32% of the variance in CQOL. Associations were also found between overall CQOL and problems discernible at birth as well as epilepsy. Other factors, including those related to shunts, were not significantly related to CQOL. It was concluded that hydrocephalus is just as great a threat to CQOL as spina bifida. Beyond the general effect of condition severity on CQOL, family resources (as measured by the CSES and FNS) represent an additional influence on CQOL. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relationship between body image and psychosocial adjustment in adolescents with spina bifida
Fulcher, A.B:; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Poster (2001, September)

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See detailWhen Chronic Disability Meets Acute Stress: Psychological and Functional Changes
Miller, A. Cate; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Johann-Murphy, Marjorie

in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement (2001), 43(3), 214-216

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See detailDisability and quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2000, June)

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See detailExperiences of Siblings of Children with Physical Disabilities: An Empirical Investigation
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Loots, G. M. P.

in Disability & Rehabilitation (2000), 22(9), 399-408

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the experiences of Dutch siblings of children with physical disabilities (n=43). METHOD: Interviews were conducted to investigate experiences of siblings in 3 ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the experiences of Dutch siblings of children with physical disabilities (n=43). METHOD: Interviews were conducted to investigate experiences of siblings in 3 areas: the sibling relationship, the relationship with parents, and the relationship with others. The siblings also completed a coping response inventory. RESULTS: The siblings reported difficulties in undertaking activities and in communicating with their brother/sister with a disability. Most siblings worried about the future and the health of their brother/sister with a disability. The siblings reported open communication and trust as the main characteristics of the relationship with their parents. They acknowledged their parents' attempts to treat all children equally, although parents were not always successful in doing so. Having a sibling with a disability did not cause problems in the relationship with friends. The awkward reactions of strangers caused the siblings much annoyance and distress. Siblings in this sample used more approach coping strategies than avoidance strategies, t(34) = 2.37, p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: The brothers and sisters generally did not experience many significant problems, however, a minority of the children did experience problems for which they would like help. In addition, they reported joys as well as problems. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact on parents of behaviour problems in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (1999, November)

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See detailStress and Family Satisfaction in Parents of Children with Port Wine Stains
Miller, A. Cate; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Watson, Heather S. et al

in Pediatric Dermatology (1999), 16(3), 190-197

A cross-sectional survey was employed to assess parenting stress, family satisfaction, and parental concerns and to determine predictors of stress in parents of children with port-wine stains (PWSs). The ... [more ▼]

A cross-sectional survey was employed to assess parenting stress, family satisfaction, and parental concerns and to determine predictors of stress in parents of children with port-wine stains (PWSs). The participants were 46 parents of 24 children receiving treatment with pulsed dye laser photocoagulation for facial PWS at an outpatient dermatology clinic based at a university medical center. Outcome measures used were self-report instruments assessing psychosocial adjustment (Parenting Stress Index, Family Satisfaction Scale, and Parental Concerns Questionnaire). As a group, parents scored in the average range on the stress and family satisfaction measures when compared with a normative sample; five parents (11%) scored in the clinical range for stress. Forty-nine percent of the variance in parenting stress was accounted for by four variables: the child's age (beta = 0.34; p = 0.031), the parents' degree of family satisfaction (beta = -0.27; p = 0.077), the level of parental concern regarding the child's facial PWS (beta = 0.45; p = 0.005), and the parents' satisfaction with staff communication (beta = -0.51; p = 0.002). The data suggest that while, as a group, parents of children with a facial PWS report to be in the average range for psychological stress, some do not fare as well as others. Factors associated with lower stress include younger children, more family cohesion and adaptation, fewer parental concerns, and greater satisfaction with parent-staff communication. The potential for the development of medical complications and psychological problems over time suggests the need for treatment of the PWS at an early age. Health care providers should be prepared to screen for clinical levels of distress and to refer parents for psychological intervention when needed. [less ▲]

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See detailBrothers and sisters of children with physical disabilities: Problems and strategies
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (1998, October)

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See detailHet is zoals het is en als ik kan helpen graag: Ervaringen van broers en zussen van kinderen met een lichamelijke handicap
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Loots, G.M.P.

in Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Kinderrevalidatie (1998), (2), 33-37

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See detailReliability and Validity of the Southern California Ordinal Scales of Development for a Sample of Young Children with Disabilities
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Miller, A. Cate; Rosen, Carol et al

in Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment (1998), 16(1), 4-14

The primary purpose of this study was to inves­tigate the reliability and validity of the Southern California Ordinal Scales of Development (SCOSD) . The SCOSD is a criterion-referenced test that assesses ... [more ▼]

The primary purpose of this study was to inves­tigate the reliability and validity of the Southern California Ordinal Scales of Development (SCOSD) . The SCOSD is a criterion-referenced test that assesses six domains of development and was designed for use with children with disabilities. Results found that the SCOSD alpha internal consistency coefficients ranged from .94 to .98; percent agreement between raters ranged from 85% to 100%; and inter­ rater correlations ranged from .96 to .99. Strong intercorrelations were found between the SCOSD and standardized domain-specific instruments (.65 to .92), providing evidence of concurrent validity. The secondary purpose was to investigate patterns of development across domains of the children's functioning. As expected, results revealed a hierarchy of skill development, with the children showing relatively less development in gross-motor skills and practical abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailTeam Approaches to Treating Children with Disabilities: A Comparison
Rosen, Carol; Miller, A. Cate; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL et al

in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (1998), 79(4), 430-434

Objective: To investigate differences in team functioning between the multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary models when treating children with disabilities. Design: A crossover trial. Setting: An ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate differences in team functioning between the multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary models when treating children with disabilities. Design: A crossover trial. Setting: An outpatient educational and rehabilitation program in a rehabilitation institute based at a university medical center. Participants: A population-based sample of 19 rehabilitation specialists and educators. Intervention: Participants attended four team meetings using the multidisciplinary approach and then attended four team meetings using the transdisciplinary approach. Outcome Measures: Behavioral ratings of team participation (Transdisciplinary Team Rating Scale) and self-report instruments of team development (Team Assessment Questionnaire) and treatment planning and goal development (Staff Perception Questionnaire). Results: Results of t tests confirmed the hypothesis that there was more team member participation during transdisciplinary meetings than during multidisciplinary meetings (p = .027), There were no differences in levels of team development (p = .329); however, staff members favored the transdisciplinary model for treatment planning and goal development (p < .001). Conclusion: This study provides evidence of the effectiveness of the transdisciplinary model. Further research is now needed to investigate outcome variables such as rate of success in attaining treatment goals when using this model. [less ▲]

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See detailBroers en zussen van kinderen met een lichamelijke handicap: Problemen en Oplossingen
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Loots, G.M.P.

Article for general public (1997)

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See detailPain, Anxiety, and Cooperativeness in Children with Cerebral Palsy after Rhizotomy: Changes Throughout Rehabilitation
Miller, A. Cate; Johann-Murphy, Marjorie; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Journal of Pediatric Psychology (1997), 22(5), 689-705

Assessed pain, anxiety, physical functioning, and cooperativeness in 32 children with spastic cerebral palsy. This is the first study to assess children throughout rehabilitation following selective ... [more ▼]

Assessed pain, anxiety, physical functioning, and cooperativeness in 32 children with spastic cerebral palsy. This is the first study to assess children throughout rehabilitation following selective posterior rhizotomy. Results of the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress and observer Liken ratings confirmed the hypothesis that children's pain and anxiety decrease over time. Children's physical functioning and cooperativeness improve over time. No significant correlation was found between pain and changes in physical functioning. Cognitive impairment, parental involvement, and children's pain behaviors explained 77% and 56% of the variance in two forms of cooperativeness. Research and clinical implications are discussed, and special considerations regarding pain assessment and management in this population are addressed. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends in service delivery: Psychological practice in rehabilitation settings
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Padrone, Frank; Feinblatt, Arlene et al

in Rehabilitation Outllook (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (2 UL)
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See detailTrends in Service Delivery: Psychological Practice in Rehabilitation Settings
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Padrone, F; Feinblatt, A et al

Scientific Conference (1995, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 UL)